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MarkSF 03-14-2011 10:41 PM

Question about surveying
 
If I find a boat worth surveying and it's in the water at a marina, do I have to organise getting it hauled so a survey can be done? Or will the surveyor organise the whole thing?

Thanks in advance!

paul323 03-15-2011 12:22 AM

AFAIK you'd normally organise the haulout - most yards have a special reduced hang-and-inspect rate. However, if you are uncertain many surveyors would help out - at a price.

BTW, I have had experience with a couple of Surveyors who are in the Bay Area. If you want their names, send me a pm. The guy I ended up using took an entire day to check my boat over; I certainly knew all the strengths - and problems - after that!

MarkSF 03-15-2011 12:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by paul323 (Post 708985)
AFAIK you'd normally organise the haulout - most yards have a special reduced hang-and-inspect rate. However, if you are uncertain many surveyors would help out - at a price.

BTW, I have had experience with a couple of Surveyors who are in the Bay Area. If you want their names, send me a pm. The guy I ended up using took an entire day to check my boat over; I certainly knew all the strengths - and problems - after that!

So I'd sail it over to a boatyard myself?

PM sent, would like to hear your surveyor experience.

Sabreman 03-15-2011 06:42 AM

Quote:

So I'd sail it over to a boatyard myself?
If you are using a broker, then you, the broker, and the surveyor would sail it over. If it is a private sale, then you, the owner, and the surveyor would sail it over. You don't sail the boat solo or without the owner or their representative onboard (too easy to make false damage claims). You have to do a sea trial anyway so the transit could be either before or after the trial. In our case, we did the sea trial after the short haul.

svHyLyte 03-15-2011 10:17 AM

  • Quote:

    Originally Posted by MarkSF (Post 708954)
    If I find a boat worth surveying and it's in the water at a marina, do I have to organise getting it hauled so a survey can be done? Or will the surveyor organise the whole thing?

Assuing your have an accepted offer to buy the boat that is subject only to an acceptable report of survey, under normal circumstances you and your broker (assuing you are using one) will arrange for the haul out and survey. In connection with this, a buyer--you--would normally have to agree to cover all of the costs of the survey and haul out and indemnify the seller for any damage that might be done to the yacht in writing in advance. On the appointed day the seller and/or his/her broker will deliver the yacht to the haul out location and supervise the actual haul out process itself. While the buyer should accompany the surveyor, a wise seller should also unless the buyer specifically objects to that. Do not be surprised if the seller and/or his broker require that you give the yard where the haul out is done a credit card or other assurance of payment for the service.

Many purchase offers are subject to both an acceptable sea trial and survey which is wise. If so, the sea trial should be conducted before you undertake the cost of a haul out. It is also worth having your surveyor with you during the sea trial so that he/she can examine the rig and sails. While few people insist on it, a good survey should include an inspection of the rigging, which must be done in the water (too dangerous to have someone go aloft while the yacht's on the hard); and, a thorough mechanical inspection which may include an analysis of the engine oil. (When we bought our boat, we insisted on having a good mechanic inspect the engine and its operation).

There is more to this subject but the foregoing should get you headed in the right direction at this point.

FWIW...

s/v HyLyte

paul323 03-15-2011 10:30 AM

Mark - you are getting some great advice here. I would suggest a slight modifier to HyLyte's excellent summary: What you actually decide to do will depend on your tolerance of risk, and the value, age and size of the boat.

Full rigging and engine inspection are definitely an option if those are in any way a concern; my engine had 200hrs on it, and had recently been re-rigged. My surveyor gave both items a good inspection (including heat-gun on the engine, magnifying glass on rigging, etc), cautioned me that a full survey would be required to give a detailed assessment, but said they looked in line with reported age and use. Given my particular situation I decided not to do the full engine and rigging surveys. Or a bigger/more valuable boat - yeah. What you so for a Santana 22 wouldn't be the same as an Olsen 54!

rmeador 03-15-2011 12:12 PM

When I took the diesel engine maintenance class at Hansen Marine, they mentioned one thing in particular... don't waste your money on an engine oil analysis unless there is a history of other analyses of the engine over time. From a single analysis, unless the problem is egregious (like water in the oil, which you should be able to tell yourself), the analysis won't tell you anything. Only when compared to other analyses from that very engine over time can it tell you how the engine is wearing internally.

YeahJohn 03-15-2011 04:26 PM

Get your boat insurance at the same time as the survey, or call your insurance company, that way you only need one survey and the survey value is your insured value. Every insurance company is different and that would suck to have to do that stuff twice. Never hurts to call first just to make sure.

MarkSF 03-15-2011 08:58 PM

Just wanted to thank everyone for the advice. Will let you know what transpires!

Minnewaska 03-16-2011 05:34 AM

As mentioned, you won't sail it yourself. The owner isn't even likely to agree to that.

While many, if not most, hull surveys are done with a quick haul, I've been counseled that an older hull should be out of the water for at least 24 hrs to properly examine for moisture. I can't back it up, but you may want to discuss this with the surveyor in advance.


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