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PeterSailer 04-10-2011 06:22 PM

naval architect
 
Anybody know a naval architect that could design a custom steel sailboat?
I have been looking around a lot but only find a few. I'm thinking of a design similar to Tamata which was owned by Bernard Moitessier. Or maybe some one can tell me where I can get Tamata's plan??

Anyways, anybody know how much it would cost me to have a architect design a sailboat for me? Not construct it ,just the plan...

Pierre

tdw 04-10-2011 07:22 PM

I found one reference that Tamata was designed and built by "John and Ned Hutton of San Francisco".

http://www.valiantvoyage.com/raiatea...s/IMG_8917.jpg

I have absolutely no idea how much it would cost you to have a custom design drawn up but I find it hard to believer believe that amongst all the steel boat designs out there you cannot find something suitable 'off the shelf'. Van de Stadt are an obvious suggestion from me but also Dudley Dix, Graeme Radford (in Australia) god even Roberts and who is that Frenchman (or at least his name sounds French) who designs for semi home builders ?

To be frank about it and as much as I am a huge admirer of BM I would have no desire whatsoever to own either of his last two boats. There are far more user friendly steelers that are well worth considering.

I make no comment on the plan itself. You want to go there then on your own head be it. :p

You should have a look at this Dix design .. not at all dissimilar to Tamata ...

Pratique 35 steel multi-chine cruiser "Salty Dog II"

http://www.dixdesign.com/pr35rig.gif

http://www.dixdesign.com/pr35acom.gifhttp://www.dixdesign.com/pr352.jpg

GaryHLucas 04-10-2011 08:05 PM

Talk to Brent Swain, save a ton of bucks, go sailing! He'll even come to work for you for a couple of weeks pulling the hull and decks together ready for finish welding. Notice I said weeks, not months or years. I've actually sailed on one of 36 foot boats. I was really impressed with how it sailed.

Gary H. Lucas

PeterSailer 04-10-2011 08:25 PM

Thanks guys, I find the Dix designs very interesting, they must be pretty rare cause I never saw one before. I really like the Hout Bay 30 and 33.

I tried to find info on Brent Swan designs or just a list of he's boats but I couldn't....Does he have a web site or something? Where do you go if you wan't to buy a plan\boat from him? I found a Brent Swain 36 on yacht world but can't find any info on the design.

Oh yeah, I don't want to build my own boat, But I might buy plans and get the Hull and deck build by a yard and finish the interior by my self... Or maybe buy a Hull and deck directly from a steel sailboat manufacturer...

tdw 04-10-2011 08:49 PM

PS,
I was also looking for Swain's web site ..

Origamiboats: The Art of Frameless Steel Boatbuilding - Home

He's the Origami man .. thought the name sounded familiar.

ps - the hull and deck are the easy bit ... it is the interior fitout that usually puts an end to these projects.

tdw 04-10-2011 09:10 PM

Peter,

I've said this in a number of threads before, my apologies if you've seen it all before but I really do beleve that sub 40' is too small for a steel boat. There is simply to much weight in the hull and deck themselves which results in less ballast in the keel where it really belongs.

Van de Stadt 34
Steel 5.4t displacement, 1.8t ballast.
Wood or Aluminium 4.5t displacement, 2.0t ballast
Now OK, some of that weight is in the keel outer casing so overall ballast is probably the same but even so you are dragging around an extra 2.0t.

What can I say ? We love the old girl, we bought her DESPITE the fact she was steel not because and our next boat will almost certainly be frozen snot.

paulk 04-10-2011 09:53 PM

You could also try Yves-Marie Tanton. Sailboat Designs of Yves-Marie*Tanton He's been operating out of Newport, RI for a while now. A while back I saw drawings he'd done for a 65' steel sloop that looked really nice.

PeterSailer 04-11-2011 09:07 AM

Quote:

I've said this in a number of threads before, my apologies if you've seen it all before but I really do beleve that sub 40' is too small for a steel boat. There is simply to much weight in the hull and deck themselves which results in less ballast in the keel where it really belongs.
That is why I'm fussy on the steel designs... I would like a steel sailboat with a really low free board, the cabin trunk should also end at the mast and a fairly deep keel so the CG wouldn't be to hight.

Now add to that a few criteria that I want on my next boat (Transom hung rudder that will accept a trim tab, Cutter rig, not too beamy and if not a full keel it needs a good V hull and a skeg to protect the rudder) and there is not much choice in the 33 to 36' range... thats why I was wondering who could make such a plan and for how much $$.

tdw,

What design is your boat? and how thick is the hull?
Both Hout Bay 30 and 33 have 3mm hulls, is that the norm for small yacht?

PeterSailer 04-11-2011 09:11 AM

One more question, Is it the norm in steel sailboat to have removable ballast? so you can do the maintenance in the keel? ( making sure once in a while that the keel isn't rusting out front the inside...)and if you have lead ballast, do you have to isolate it from the hull?

mitiempo 04-11-2011 11:21 AM

The ballast is usually welded over after it is installed and isolated from the steel.

Look at aluminum. In the size range you are after a much better sailing boat.


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