Sailing without heeling - SailNet Community
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 32 Old 08-04-2003 Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 12
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
Sailing without heeling

I made a mistake in my last post, so I didin''t find what I was looking for.

My new first mate enjoys being on the water, but can''t stand heeling beyond five degrees. I need some reccomendations on a stiff monohull, 27-32 feet that is quite easy to sail flat. My inclination is that a fractional rig would be most suited for this because it is so easy to bleed the main, but I could be wrong.

Thank you
zperson is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 32 Old 08-04-2003
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Wilson, NY
Posts: 562
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 15
 
Sailing without heeling

5 degress ain''t much - does it have to be a mono hull?
Irwin32 is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #3 of 32 Old 08-04-2003
Senior Nappy Headed Ho
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Posts: 734
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
Sailing without heeling

Your options are so limited with the restriction of 5 degrees. A better tack (pun intended) is to calmly explain the dynamics of a sailboat and help her get over the fear that a lot of new sailors have. Once you''ve explained that you cannot tip the boat over she should feel more confident. A heavy slug of a sloop is not going to be fast or fun to sail. Wrap your arms around your new first make, dance with her in the moon light on the deck and help her through this phase.
Mr. Sensitive denr
Denr is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #4 of 32 Old 08-04-2003
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 393
Thanks: 1
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 14
 
Sailing without heeling

your options as I under stand them are:

1.) Get a stiff boat such as a Gozzard (was sailing one last weekend, nice boats, if a bit on the slow side) and only sail down wind, or in winds under 7 knots.

2.) Get a multi.

or

3.) (and I prefer this one) go with denr''s suggestion, and explain boats to them, and help them get used to healing.

-- James
jbarros is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #5 of 32 Old 08-05-2003
Moderator
 
Jeff_H's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: Annapolis, Md
Posts: 6,904
Thanks: 5
Thanked 152 Times in 124 Posts
Rep Power: 10
     
Sailing without heeling

Actually, I don''t think that you have an option except explaining the physics. Even a Catamarran will heel 5 degrees in a blow. There are ways of reducing heel but even then that might mean the difference between a 15 degree heel and a 10 degree heel. (Most cars will lean more than 5 degrees in a turn.)

Jeff
Jeff_H is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #6 of 32 Old 08-05-2003
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 56
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 14
 
Sailing without heeling

The admiral on my boat says 15 degrees is the limit. At 5 degress you''ll always be at the dock.

I think the real problem that folks have with heeling is the shifting back and forth when combined with up and down pitching. A heavier, longer boat won''t be heeeling back and forth so much.

Heeling when stable is not really all that hard to get used to. Even my mom (73 years old) who is deathly afraid of the water in general and hates heeling more than the admiral does can handle 15 degrees if it is a smooth ride in a calm sea. Add 3 ft waves and all bets are off.

I also notice the admiral handles the heeling better than when we started to sail. We had a really bad heeling expeience of 55 degrees on a 22 ft boat and since then the admiral has been very shy when it comes to heeling. On our heavy 33 ft boat she has handled it all very well. At about 30 ft the heeling is a lot smoother than it is in a small dinghy. Sometimes bigger is better. If the first mate won''t sail then the trip is a problem or at least when you get back to port it is.
pblais is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #7 of 32 Old 08-06-2003
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 118
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 13
 
Sailing without heeling

Please try to explain what, exactly, the problem really is. Just saying she doesn''t like heeling doesn''t explain the issue.

Does she think the boat will tip?
Does she get seasick?
Is she just a princess?

You won''t solve the problem until you understand the exact issue or issues.
sadie14 is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #8 of 32 Old 08-06-2003
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Posts: 360
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 14
 
Sailing without heeling

The first time the Admiral and I went sailing, she thought the boat was going to tip over as it started to heel. I tried explaining the physics involved, and how modern sailboat designs incorporate the phenomenom of heeling to deal with increasing wind speed. At first, she was not convinced.

Since she didn''t take my word for it, I decided to hire a sailing instructor who took us out on our boat. He not only showed us how to anchor, moor and dock, but he also pointed out how a sailboat functions - which means it MUST heel in order to sail when the wind comes from any direction except from the rear or within about 45 degrees ahead (in which case the boat can''t sail).

At one point, he had us sailing on a broad reach with about 15 knot winds apparent. The boat was heeled over about 20 degrees when he exclaimed, "Now THIS is sailing!" From that time on, the Admiral doesn''t mind heeling, even if the lee-side rail gets awash as a result of an occasional wave. However, she and I still have problems dealing with excessive weather helm. I''m learning to reduce it by moving the traveler leeward and/or flatten the main and/or reefing the main. Also, since tuning the standing rigging, I''ve noticed that both sails can be set flatter than before, which has helped reduce weather helm, and has increased the boat''s speed nearer to its theoretical hull speed.

My advice - Hire an instructor, or have her take some sailing lessons. Most sailing schools have gift certificates. ;^)

~ Happy sails to you ~ _/) ~
928frenzy is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #9 of 32 Old 08-06-2003
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 56
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 14
 
Sailing without heeling

I agree with 928gfrenzy. telling the Admiral is not the same as a sailing instructor telling the Admiral.

It''s also just a great idea to make sure both crew and command understand the operation of the vessle. It''s safer and understanding clears up a lot of problems with moral and crew relations.

We spent a lot on lessons and without them i would be sailing alone.
pblais is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #10 of 32 Old 08-07-2003
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 31
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
Sailing without heeling

Am I missing something here?

The wife is comfortable with the heeling effect of a sailboat ONLY after a paid, professional sailing instructor says so, when nothing has changed in any way on the boat other than the person announcing that everything is OK?

Logic would dictate that since the instructor has done nothing more than reaffirm what has (probably) already been said by the husband, who has a good understand of how sailboats function, the wife would then have faith in the husband and ensuing explanations concerning the boat.

Interesting… Maybe there should be some sort of affordable manual written by a professional sailing instructor covering all possible unusual, uncomfortable and potentially frightening situations on a sailboat to ensure the uninitiated that everything is going to be OK.

Honey, are you reading this…???

dameware is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.


User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Cats on Board slosharron Living Aboard 74 04-07-2014 09:12 AM
sailing schools-vs-seat of your pants learning to sail tybeefolk Learning to Sail 25 02-16-2010 12:50 PM
SAILING IN THE AEGEAN OLYMPICYACHTS Chartering 0 11-20-2002 12:54 PM
SAILING IN THE AEGEAN OLYMPICYACHTS Chartering 0 11-20-2002 12:52 PM
ISAF Eligibility Requirements paulk Racing 4 02-05-2001 11:25 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome