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  #11  
Old 11-01-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pdqaltair View Post
(No, I'm not divorced and never will be, but I thought it read better that way.)
Likewise but I still like walking the docks, looking, drooling and dreaming - I'm talking about boats... boats.
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  #12  
Old 11-01-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SloopJonB View Post
Likewise but I still like walking the docks, looking, drooling and dreaming - I'm talking about boats... boats.


My wife accused me of going to the US Sailing show in Annapolis to look at women, MEANING BOATS. And damn it, I only looked at boats....
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  #13  
Old 11-01-2011
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I think the "sweet spot" as you describe is from about 5 to 15 years old. Boat has taken the big depreciation hit but is still new enough to avoid many of the age related problems. That said, I like boats from the 1980s, mainly because so many of the builders I like (Cal, Pearson, Ericson, etc.) went out of business around 1990, and if you can find a well cared for example, you have a bargain.
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Come to think of it, that applies to people as well. All you geezers out there - have you noticed how hot many 50+ women are? [/QUOTE]

Funny you should mention this but I find this to be absolutely true. Even when I was in my 30's I found 50+ women very attractive. Something about their self confidence and their attention to their feminine attributes.
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Old 11-01-2011
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The boats I keep an eye on are ones that I know the owner and the history. There are a couple of folks locally that leave boats in much better condition than they bought them, and even when they bought them, they were/are excellent examples of a given design. I'd say the newest boat is about 1993, the oldest, about 1985, so both have already taken the biggest depreciation hit.
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  #16  
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My thought was, as I can't afford a newer boat, to get an older one by a good builder in the hope of avoiding serious problems.

I'll let you know how that works out in about 10 years from now.
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  #17  
Old 11-01-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bljones View Post
I like boats built in the mid-70s. Old enough to be cheap, new enough to have some life left, built in an era before blisters and particle board joinery. Maybe it's just my nostalgia-fogged eye, but it seems like many of the designs of the 70s still look attractive, while many later designs just look dated a decade or so later.
Actually, the 1970's was the worst period for blisters as that was the time when the formulations changed in response to the OPEc induced global fuel shortages and was also a period when accelerators were still widely being abused, fabrics were mishandled, and resin/catalyst proporting were still pretty lax.

It was also the time when hull thickness lightened but before internal framing became the norm so the boats of that era flexed and fatigued more rapidly than any other period before or after.

It was also a time when boats still used non-marine plywood for interiors and finished it behind formica and false teak veneers dyed to look like teak.

It was also a time when deck and cabin hardware was very crude compared to today. (Remember winch farms, halyard jambers, pressure alcohol stoves.

Depending on the specific design, rigs had gotten lighter and more fragile, often depending on checkstays, babystays and running backstays to keep the rig up as well.

And it was also a period when the popular hull and rig designs made for physically difficult boats to sail. Amoungst those of us who owned and raced boats of the IOR era, the general low regard held toward boats of that era results from issues that go far beyond the Fastnet Disaster.

In a broad general sense, IOR era boats were designed to be sailed by large crews with their weight on the rail for ballast. They tend to be unforgiving and require both strength and skill to sail well. While modern sails and hardware can go a long way toward making them less physical to sail, they still are hard boats to push around and are more likely to rely on a skilled crew to save the boat rather than the boat saving the crew.

Back to the question of a period with a sweet spot age wise, With so many better designs out there, for similar prices, I would suggest that the late 1980's and early 1990's offered better built, better sailing, easier to handle and safer designs.

Jeff
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  #18  
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Depreciation is really and accounting function and may have not relationship to the actual value of an item. Take a lool at Practical Sailor Practical Boat Buying and you will see how prices vary over time dependent upon economic conditions. Maintenance also is a major factor and contributor to a useful life of a item.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff_H View Post
Actually, the 1970's was the worst period for blisters as that was the time when the formulations changed in response to the OPEc induced global fuel shortages and was also a period when accelerators were still widely being abused, fabrics were mishandled, and resin/catalyst proporting were still pretty lax.

It was also the time when hull thickness lightened but before internal framing became the norm so the boats of that era flexed and fatigued more rapidly than any other period before or after.

It was also a time when boats still used non-marine plywood for interiors and finished it behind formica and false teak veneers dyed to look like teak.

It was also a time when deck and cabin hardware was very crude compared to today. (Remember winch farms, halyard jambers, pressure alcohol stoves.

Depending on the specific design, rigs had gotten lighter and more fragile, often depending on checkstays, babystays and running backstays to keep the rig up as well.

And it was also a period when the popular hull and rig designs made for physically difficult boats to sail. Amoungst those of us who owned and raced boats of the IOR era, the general low regard held toward boats of that era results from issues that go far beyond the Fastnet Disaster.

In a broad general sense, IOR era boats were designed to be sailed by large crews with their weight on the rail for ballast. They tend to be unforgiving and require both strength and skill to sail well. While modern sails and hardware can go a long way toward making them less physical to sail, they still are hard boats to push around and are more likely to rely on a skilled crew to save the boat rather than the boat saving the crew.

Back to the question of a period with a sweet spot age wise, With so many better designs out there, for similar prices, I would suggest that the late 1980's and early 1990's offered better built, better sailing, easier to handle and safer designs.

Jeff
If a 70s or 80s boat doesn't have blisters now, it probably never will, unless the owner is persuaded to strip the gelcoat off.
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  #20  
Old 11-01-2011
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Originally Posted by Mark1948 View Post
Depreciation is really and accounting function and may have not relationship to the actual value of an item. Take a lool at Practical Sailor Practical Boat Buying and you will see how prices vary over time dependent upon economic conditions. Maintenance also is a major factor and contributor to a useful life of a item.
When buying a boat that cost $200,000 new for 10% of the original amount, it's important to remember that your savings are only an accounting function.
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