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-   -   Catalina 42 vs 400 MK II (new) (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/boat-review-purchase-forum/8211-catalina-42-vs-400-mk-ii-new.html)

Bluesmoods 10-06-2003 02:20 PM

Catalina 42 vs 400 MK II (new)
 
We are looking at buying a new Catalina 42 Mk II or a new 400. The 400 is about the sme price as the 42.

So, what does one do. We are 4 kids and 4 adults most of the time. This would lean me toward the space offered by the 42. I sail often and it''s all coastal cruising. I guess maybe buy as much boat as I can for the same dollar?

I am looking for input here. Which boat is a better performing boat? Which has a history with fewer problems? All that good stuff.

I don''t particularly care for the two helm stations on the 400 but I don''t mind it if it is all around a better boat than the 42.

I do like the interior appointment of the 400. I am coming off of a 350 which has been great, but does not offer the room we need with so many on board all of the time.

The 42 is a lot of boat. We will not get in mast furling on either boat. Is it hard to manage short handed? (or with full crew for that matter?

Thanks....

jbanta 10-06-2003 02:31 PM

Catalina 42 vs 400 MK II (new)
 
We will not get in mast furling on either boat. Is it hard to manage short handed? (or with full crew for that matter?

There is a Huge differance with sail handling and preformance with a battened sail. With an in mast furler the battens would be gone. Have you though of an in boom furler?

tsenator 10-06-2003 04:04 PM

Catalina 42 vs 400 MK II (new)
 
Sue,

These two boats have been compared & debated on the catalina Sailnet lists for some time now. I would go through the archives and see if you can find some comments.

http://members.sailnet.com/email_archives/index.cfm

(Search in both the C400 and the C42 list)

Maybe even join the individual lists and ask the exact same question. I bet it would be very interesting to see what the individual owners say.

My take from the whole thing is that they are both comparable boats as far as performance with each having their sweet spots, but neither really having any kind of big advantage. But the C400 has a little bit more Sa/D ratio.

I think it really comes down to style and layout. The C400 is to the C42 as the C350 is to the C36. The C400 has a much beamier aft and probably a bit higher freeboard, while the C42 has more classic lines.

Another minor (or not so minor) consideration is draft. I believe the C42 has a 4''10" wing draft, but the C400 wing is 5''4". The extra 1/2 foot might help in your area.

I can tell you this, when the 2 boats are on moorings next to each other, the C400 looks huge next to the C42. If you are going for maximum volume in the aft cabin, how could you not want the C400.

I too, am torn on which boat I would rather have. While I covet the C400''s huge aft cabin and real full sized walk around bed, I love the classic looks of the C42.

My "personal" feeling is, if I was going to continue coastal cruising I''d go for the C400, the aft berth and all the room it allows. If I was doing more offshore trips, I might lean towards the layout of the C42 which is less wide open and easier to berth in and has more layout options that might conducive to it.

Bottom line -- Its a wash

ps. Even though you would lose a bit of effeciency with the furling main, I really don''t think you would notice a huge difference coastal cruising on these boats. These are mast head rigged boats, where most of the power is being driven by the jib and not the mainsail. From what I have been told, by a few people, is that the percentage lost by a furling main is very little as compared to the whole sail area and typically makes a small difference that is only noticable when racing on some points of sail.

With that said I have a traditional main on my C36 with full battens and I like the easy capability to acheive and maintain sail shape. I don''t think I want a furling main, but I have to admit a huge envious glint in my eye when I see how easy it is for them to roll in and out their main to use it or put it away.

captron400 12-11-2008 05:34 PM

As the former owner of C400 #74 (Good Vibrations) for 11 years and Commodore / Tech Editor for just as long, I'd like to point out the 400 and 42 are both good boats but there is a noticable difference in performance. The 400 is lighter, has more sail area, and it's waterline length is close to 1 foot longer. If I was going for cabin arrangements I'd probably pick the 42. Anything else gives the 400 the nod.

Cruisingdad 12-11-2008 05:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by captron400 (Post 415515)
As the former owner of C400 #74 (Good Vibrations) for 11 years and Commodore / Tech Editor for just as long, I'd like to point out the 400 and 42 are both good boats but there is a noticable difference in performance. The 400 is lighter, has more sail area, and it's waterline length is close to 1 foot longer. If I was going for cabin arrangements I'd probably pick the 42. Anything else gives the 400 the nod.

Hey Ron,

They posted this in 2003. Best bet is they already made their choice!! I agree with what you said though, except the cabin arrangement part. The 42 has some drawbacks there too - or some differences I should say that you will either like or not like.

Brian

captron400 12-11-2008 05:51 PM

Whereabouts of hull #74
 
Hi -

My name is Ron Marcuse, former owner of hull #74 that was named "Good Vibrations" while I owned it. I was the founder, Commodore and Tech Editor of the association for about 11 years before selling the boat around 15 months ago. Boat was sold to a just retired couple from Colorado who were bringing it to the Carribean and had renamed it "Gravyboat". But I just heard elsewhere that someone else now has the boat and who is on this forum. I'd like to find out exactly what happened to it. The boat and I had some memorable experiences and it will always be part of my life. You don't race the Whitbred fleet single handed up the Chesapeake and forget about it.

The skinny water down here in SW Florida more or less forced the sale of the boat and I wound up with a trimaran. Gave up interior room for no keel and loads of speed. Where's the Whitbred fleet now?

Thanks.

captron400 12-11-2008 05:58 PM

The forum has changed a lot since I last saw it. I had spotted the words "equal" and "wash" comparing the 400 and 42. That just ain't so and I had to respond. I had to set up a rear view mirror when I raced against any 42's. Ditto for 470's.

Main reason why I came back is to find out what happened to my old boat.

Ron Marcuse

soulfinger 12-13-2008 09:26 AM

You really think you can outsail a 470 with a 400? That seems kinda hard to swallow.....maybe in light air. I've been on a 470 doing 11 knots!

mcfsailor 01-16-2009 10:52 PM

C42 vs C400
 
I know this thread is coming in well after the fact but I just couldn't resist. My Catalina 400, Windfall, (#290) is blazing fast but cannot compete with the 470. You just can't fight waterline!
As for the debate over the C-42 vs C-400 issue: All the comments made, so far, are somewhat acurate. The 400 will beat a 42 anyday for speed but they are completely different boats...in every way. They both have strong points. I believe anyone who has not sailed a duel helmed boat is going to feel rather strange about it, at first. But my consensus is that once you have two wheels, you'll never go back to one.
One of my closest sailing friends have a C-42 and we sail her regularly. She is a great sailing boat and they love her but for me, there is nothing out there in the 40 foot range (and price) that can compare with a Catalina 400.

JohnRPollard 01-17-2009 01:51 PM

Speaking as someone that has considered both these boats, here's my take:

The 400 appears to be a more evolved hull form. I do not doubt that it will out sail the 42, and likely has every bit as much interior volume (maybe more).

To my mind, the distinguishing factor comes down to whether you are interested in a two-cabin boat or a three-cabin boat.

Both boats offer a choice. But if you get a 3-cabin 400, the "owner's" cabin gets split into two smaller cabins. This leaves no larger-sized owner's cabin. Essentially the guest v-berth becomes the "owner's" cabin.

Whereas if you get a 3-cabin 42, the "owner's" cabin (whether pullman or centerline) is retained and a third guest cabin is added at the port quarter (in lieu of storage lockers).

Regardless of differences in hull design, helms, etc, if I wanted a 2-cabin boat, I'd take the 400. If I wanted a 3-cabin boat, I'd take the 42.


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