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-   -   Boat shopping: round two (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/boat-review-purchase-forum/87220-boat-shopping-round-two.html)

dmcMaine 05-09-2012 02:01 PM

Boat shopping: round two
 
I know. I don't post much.

Last November I came very close to purchasing an old pearson Triton that was apparently in exceptional shape for its age. At the last moment, the Admiral talked me out of it.

So. Six months after my last aborted attempt, I'm at it again.... boat shopping.

The basics are this:
We are a family of 6 (2 boys 15&8, 2 girls 8&6). While I do think we might want to do a full family daysail or two, I do expect that after the 'new hotness' wears off it will be primarily daysails, and occasional weekending, consisting of me with any of the children who stay interested in it. My prediction is that my two 8-year-olds will enjoy it. The others not so much. My wife isn't that interested in sailing, but is also not against it.

The sailing grounds are coastal Maine. We live near Bath, and a 15ish minute drive to two marinas (Robinhood, and Great Island) with others not too far.

Primary use would be daysails and weekending for most likely up to 4 with 5-6 on shorter days. Although eventually I would like to cruise downeast, penobscot bay, or even as far as the Canadian maritimes at some point in the future. Long-distance journeys such as bermuda, florida, etc. aren't really in the cards. There is also a very good possibility that I'll spend a decent amount of 'zen' time on board alone. ;)

In my early 20's I did a decent bit of dinghy and beach cat sailing in the lagoon of Diego Garcia. Now in my early 40's, I am finally at a place financially where a boat is possible. Unfortunately, I haven't been able to sail since.

Since passing on the triton last fall, I've done quite a bit of studying. Later this month I also have a sailing course scheduled. (yay!!!) In the meantime I'm looking at craigslist, and yachtworld for an idea about what is out there right now.

As I see it, I have a few options. I could go with a trailerable (GMC Yukon as tow vehicle). But if everyone wants to sail we have problems. Plus my yard's layout makes parking the trailer "interesting". I could go larger, but when several drop out I now have a larger boat than I need. Then again a larger boat keeps the longer vacation plans in sight. So I'm still conflicted. I'm not really interested in dinghys. Maine's water is just a wee bit colder than the tropical indian ocean.

Back in the fall, I was looking at boats that split the difference, things like the triton, and other boats in the 27-30ft length with standing-head room in the main cabin. Something big enough for daysails/overnights, and small enough to handle on my own.

Budget isn't really fixed. Although ideally 'ready to go' under $20k is a goal. $30K a high end. But if the boat and deal were right, I could probably be OK going as high as $35k or so. Anything higher, and I'd probably have to look for a solo liveaboard, if you get my meaning. =D

So. There it is. I do greatly value the opinions of the Sailnet community. Any and all insight is very welcome.

Faster 05-09-2012 02:09 PM

Re: Boat shopping: round two
 
First obstacle will be finding a boat with a big enough cockpit to actually handle that size crew without a lot of toe stomping and crowding.
Yes, many cockpits appear to seat 6 or 8 but in reality the crew is moving ballast and will switch from side to side so truly comfortable use sort of dictates a crew size half of what the cockpit will actually 'seat'.

A large cockpit daysailer may fit your bill, but may preclude eventual cruises.. this is a tough bill to fill.

I think your budget is reasonable, you'll need to cruise the brokers and docks to really 'see' (as opposed to YW listings) the boats that interest you. Best of luck.

Cruisingdad 05-09-2012 02:33 PM

Re: Boat shopping: round two
 
If you want to get the "crew" on board, why not get a racer? Get into racing and you might see a lot more of your older kids.

Racing will get into your blood and the kids will love it a lot more than sittin back listening to Marley and dreaming of far off sunsets.

Problem with race boats is that they are not comfortable weekenders for the most part (by design). They are usually gutted and made for speed.

Boats: Beneteau 10m (I have raced this boat a lot and she is surprinsgly fast), and old J, Bene First series (are 'ok'), Flying Tigers (A bob perry design... kicked our butt one time), S-2... those are all realtively cheap. The S-2's have a huge following.

Just some random thoughts.

Brian

Captainmeme 05-09-2012 02:41 PM

Re: Boat shopping: round two
 
Have you considered renting/chartering a boat? While you didn't say how much time you have to sail/maintain a boat you did say "Unfortunately, I haven't been able to sail since."
How often do you think you will get the whole family on the water? Once a month? Four times a year? Maybe renting a boat a few times will enlighten you on just how enthusiastic the Admiral and her crew are towards sailing.

cmp1110 05-09-2012 05:56 PM

Boat shopping: round two
 
I have a hunter 28.5 and it is easy to singlehand yet with standing headroom and s fair beam at 10-6

dmcMaine 05-09-2012 06:00 PM

Re: Boat shopping: round two
 
Good points. :)

To be honest I doubt I'll face the 'everyone wants to go' scenario too much. I swear a large family is an awful lot like herding cats! My Admiral is very comfortable commanding from the home office, and my teen, who built a beautiful wooden skiff in a seventh grade extra program, is now firmly in the hormonal angst stage. So the normal thing I see is me with a couple of kiddos along 80% of the time.

@Captain- My 20-year sailing gap has been due to three things: job, babies, and debt. I took a new job a few years ago, my babies are all in school now, and as of last July I am completely debt free. :) I would say sailing opportunities are 3/4 of weekends, and if I snag a spot at one of the marinas 15 minutes from home, a possibe dinner sail (My work hours are offset on the early side...normally I am home by 4pm to handle winter after-school activities).

Actually now that I think of it. I'm sure I read advice in another thread along the lines of buy the boat that fits your everyday needs. Charter for the big trips. Might that be a good option? A single-hand capable boat that fits 4 of us, and if we want a full crew vacation then charter something big enough for that?

I'm not too keen on racing. Although who knows? We could try it and be hooked.

JimsCAL 05-09-2012 07:47 PM

Re: Boat shopping: round two
 
If you liked the Triton, you might consider this which is owned by a friend.

1966 Pearson Ariel sailboat for sale in New York

scratchee 05-09-2012 09:12 PM

Re: Boat shopping: round two
 
Your situation sounds very similar to mine (or, where I was two months ago.) I'm 45 and did a fair amount of sailing in college, plus a few week-long charters in my late 20's. But none since. After I got married and had a couple kids, owning a boat just didn't even seem to be in the realm of possibility.

Then in February, due to a couple events that I won't bore you with, I started looking at boats just for fun. I was astounded at what the market is like these days. I was seeing boats for under $10k that would have been in the high twenties in 1996, which was the last time I entertained the idea of buying a boat. I mentioned it to my wife, and to my great surprise she seemed receptive. So if it's not too late to make a long story short, I own a Cal 2-27. I too figure that most of my sailing will be me plus one or two others.

I have two specific ideas to consider:

- Buy a seaworthy but not beautiful boat in the 27-30 foot range for whatever price you can pay with little or no debt, with the understanding that you're on a two-year trial. Based on your estimated crew size, you won't have very many times when everyone wants to go at once. If two years go by and you're still sailing and still married (;)), and a few of the kids are still interested, you can trade up for bigger and/or more beautiful. Or sell and get out if otherwise.

- Trial or no trial, a 27-30 footer might be a good compromise between how many you can carry vs. how many you realistically will carry on a typical trip.

dmcMaine 05-10-2012 09:28 AM

Re: Boat shopping: round two
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by scratchee (Post 869405)
- Buy a seaworthy but not beautiful boat in the 27-30 foot range for whatever price you can pay with little or no debt, with the understanding that you're on a two-year trial. Based on your estimated crew size, you won't have very many times when everyone wants to go at once. If two years go by and you're still sailing and still married (;)), and a few of the kids are still interested, you can trade up for bigger and/or more beautiful. Or sell and get out if otherwise.

- Trial or no trial, a 27-30 footer might be a good compromise between how many you can carry vs. how many you realistically will carry on a typical trip.

Thanks for the advice. I think I'm coming to a similar conclusion. Try to minimize the investment, and trade up later if necessary or sell in the worst case. 27-30ft should work fine 90% of the time.

So perhaps something along the lines of
1965 Tartan 27 Sail Boat For Sale - www.yachtworld.com

or I see this, but I don't know anything about this boat, and southwest harbor is a little bit of a hike to get to.
1967 Niagra Hinterholler Sloop Sail Boat For Sale - www.yachtworld.com

I also know Sabre is a Maine builder, and generally well regarded.

Of course there seems to be a glut of mid-teen to lower-20's thirty footers out there.

I seem to be a sucker for older boats with classic lines. Well, old classics and lesser-known cult favorites. Don't even get me started on ketches and yawls. They are in the "in a perfect world, I would" category. ;) (edit: meaning that I'm not really considering them...just absolutely love the idea of them)

Faster 05-10-2012 09:38 AM

Re: Boat shopping: round two
 
Hinterhoeller is/was a well regarded Canadian boat builder, and George H is sorta famous for his early 24 foot Shark design, which was produced by various other builders including C&C. Hinterhoeller also built the Niagara series and the Nonsuch Catboats.

This example is an older one but looks well kept.. interesting little boat.


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