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davidpm 08-20-2012 10:36 PM

In-mast furling
 
What is the process to convert an in-mast furling system to a standard slab reefing system?

I have heard that the big charter companies are moving away from the in mast fullers? Is that true?

What is your experience with the in-mast systems and in conversions.

lajimo 08-20-2012 11:59 PM

In-mast furling
 
Wow that's interesting. Getting in- mast furling installed is really expensive - seems like converting one back to a non-furling system will really ding the boats value...

CalebD 08-21-2012 12:57 AM

Re: In-mast furling
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by davidpm (Post 912326)
What is the process to convert an in-mast furling system to a standard slab reefing system?

I have heard that the big charter companies are moving away from the in mast fullers? Is that true?

What is your experience with the in-mast systems and in conversions.

Remove in mast furler or just bury in the mast behind new sail track.

I would not be surprised if the charter companies are moving away from in-mast furling main sails. The more complicated the system the more likely it is to cause problems, rip the sails and generally be a PITA. I'd think electrically powered ones would be the least effective.

Absolutely no experience with in-mast furling systems, I'm just shooting from the hip. They are probably great in under 20 knots of wind and I know that some here love their in-mast furled main sails. I just doubt that they are any easier to use than a standard slab reefing setup which is less likely to tear the sail to shreds.

night0wl 08-21-2012 01:11 AM

Re: In-mast furling
 
I dont know about you, but I haven't seen an in-mast furling unit on a charter boat (Moorings, Sunsail, etc) in some time. They're almost always a traditional setup.

MedSailor 08-21-2012 01:12 AM

Re: In-mast furling
 
I have no idea if it's feasible or not, but you might look into selling your mast since the in-mast roller furlers ARE so expensive. You might be able to sell yours and buy a new one and come out ahead.

Better yet, find the owners group for your type of boat and see about getting a mast swap with someone else who has the same size boat. I bet if you offered your mast in trade for a regular one you could get the other guy to pay for the swap and to pay for all new standing rigging for your new mast. Since you'd swap sails too you wouldn't have to buy a new main either.

Just a couple thoughts.

MedSailor

tdw 08-21-2012 01:40 AM

Re: In-mast furling
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by davidpm (Post 912326)
What is the process to convert an in-mast furling system to a standard slab reefing system?

I have heard that the big charter companies are moving away from the in mast fullers? Is that true?

What is your experience with the in-mast systems and in conversions.

David,

To be honest I do not think its practical to convert back unless you go for a new mast. You'd have to put some kind of plate over the opening in the mast and a track onto that. Not to mention the fact that you'd end up with a bigger heavier mast than needed. (note - Seldon furler masts have a secondary track for a trisail. Perhaps this could be used but it is off centre.)

Now, having used a furling mast for the past year and a bit I have to say that I am quite happy with the thing. Beats the hell out of stomping up forward to manhandle the main when reefing.

Why would charter firms go back ? Cost perhaps, while modern lazy jack systems may make sail handling a lot easier, or are they going in boom ?

Regards

Andrew B

SimonV 08-21-2012 01:43 AM

Re: In-mast furling
 
Had this conversation at a cruisers get together at Hogs breath cafe, Port Douglas, seems those that have it would never have anything else, and those that didn't have it hated it or secretly wanted it. I for one don't have it but hope my next boat does. It seems there is no problem furling in up to 45 knots as long as you have the angle right between the boom and mast, those that know told me they just mark the boom vang control sheet and keep tension on the out haul. The only problem seemed to be as the sail got old and worn it would stretch and this bagging of the sail did hamper the furling process, they fixed this by having it re cut and stitched.

SloopJonB 08-21-2012 01:08 PM

Re: In-mast furling
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by SimonV (Post 912376)
Had this conversation at a cruisers get together at Hogs breath cafe, Port Douglas, seems those that have it would never have anything else, and those that didn't have it hated it or secretly wanted it. I for one don't have it but hope my next boat does. It seems there is no problem furling in up to 45 knots as long as you have the angle right between the boom and mast, those that know told me they just mark the boom vang control sheet and keep tension on the out haul. The only problem seemed to be as the sail got old and worn it would stretch and this bagging of the sail did hamper the furling process, they fixed this by having it re cut and stitched.

I've used one a fair bit on a Hunter 38 and I don't like it. We've had problems with a curl in the sail up high jamming it - had to hoist the skipper up with tools to unjam it and have had to be VERY careful when furling ever since. There is very little room in the slot for any wrinkles etc. to fit through. I also find it very hard work to wind in & out - lots of friction. It has to be winched the whole way. It takes much more effort than conventional hoisting from the boom.

I vastly prefer lazyjacks.

SecondWindNC 08-21-2012 01:26 PM

Re: In-mast furling
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by SloopJonB (Post 912516)
I've used one a fair bit on a Hunter 38 and I don't like it. We've had problems with a curl in the sail up high jamming it - had to hoist the skipper up with tools to unjam it and have had to be VERY careful when furling ever since. There is very little room in the slot for any wrinkles etc. to fit through. I also find it very hard work to wind in & out - lots of friction. It has to be winched the whole way. It takes much more effort than conventional hoisting from the boom.

I vastly prefer lazyjacks.

I've had a very different experience using in-mast furling on several different boats - primarily a Catalina 36 and a Saga 409 but also a Hunter 306 and a Jeanneau 45. I've had very little trouble with jamming - you need to keep the boom angle within reason and keep slight tension on the outhaul when furling, but the in-mast furling systems I've used have all worked pretty smoothly. I find it to be much less effort than hoisting a traditional main. So much so that I think people use the mainsail more. It's common to see boats with traditional mains sailing jib-only because of the effort involved in taking off the sail cover and sail ties, and hoisting, then flaking, tying, and covering to put it all back away when finished. With in-mast you just roll it out, sail, and roll it back in.

ccher 08-21-2012 02:48 PM

Re: In-mast furling
 
Agree with 2ndWind. My current boat has in mast furling and my next boat will have it. Regarding the OP's question I have a Charleston Spar system (now Sparcraft I think) and it appears to have a slot in the extrusion for sail slides. Perhaps yours does as well. Would take some rearranging of the halyard sheave, tac fitting, etc. but seems like it could be done without a huge expense.


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