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  #41  
Old 11-18-2012
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re: First boat: Cal 2-27, Pearson 28 or Islander 28?

Well, after a long search, it looks like I found my boat, and it's none of the above. It's a Cal 29. A little bigger than the others, but should still be manageable. By all accounts she should be stiff and well balanced, and a little faster.

It comes with an 8 year old 22HP Beta diesel and is fully setup for single-handing. The owner actually raced her single-handed all last season. 2 year old standing rigging, which is good, but a 2 year old bottom that would probably need a refresh. The sails seem a bit old, but I'm no expert and she seemed to do well to windward on the test sail... survey will tell.

The only iffy part was quite a lot of play in the rudder. It could be just the bolts holding the tiller, but then again could be something else. Could this be a serious issue?

Mast support beam, which apparently is a problem spot on these boats, is the original steel, so it's probably rusted to some degree. The was no noticeable sagging and the owner said the new rigging didn't need to be tightened in the two years since the installation. Again, survey will tell.

Another thing is that the deck is covered by those rubber non-skid panels that look like they're inset into the deck. Is there anything I need to know about those? They seemed to be in good shape...

Other than that, she could use a repaint on the deck and inside the cabin, refinish on the few teak pieces on deck, maybe some minor cleanup in the cabin, but I'm not planning on cruising so that's not really an issue.

I guess that electric project will have to wait a few years

Ok, off to arrange the survey now. Wish me luck

Cheers,
Alex.
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  #42  
Old 11-19-2012
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re: First boat: Cal 2-27, Pearson 28 or Islander 28?

You should carefully inspect the rudder to determine why there is play. May be simply a worn bearing or could be more serious.

My concern with the rubber nonskid is whether they were applied to cover up a cheap drill and fill wet balsa core job.

Were you able to inspect the mast step?

Why is the owner selling?
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Old 11-19-2012
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re: First boat: Cal 2-27, Pearson 28 or Islander 28?

If the play is in the rudder post, the bearings in the rudder post tube are probably shot. In that vintage Cal the tube goes all the way from the hull to just below the tiller head (there is no stuffing box, et cetera). The shaft is aligned by a couple of plastic sleeve bearings/bushings pressed inside the tube. These bearings get worn over time and some play results. You could get a couple-three new plastic bearings machined out of Delrin plastic, but that will probably be a bit pricey unless you can do it yourself. The "classic" fix is fairly cheap and easy, but can be a little messy; you simply fill the space between the rudder post and the tube with epoxy. There are at least a couple of descriptions of the process on the net (there might even be one on SN; Google is your friend). It's not to difficult. But does have to be done with the boat out of the water.
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Old 11-19-2012
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re: First boat: Cal 2-27, Pearson 28 or Islander 28?

Often a good bit of play can be found in the tiller head itself.. so a careful look for the source is in order.

New bushings would not be that big a deal, esp if the stock itself has not worn too badly.
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Old 11-19-2012
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re: First boat: Cal 2-27, Pearson 28 or Islander 28?

Quote:
Originally Posted by kotyara View Post
Well, after a long search, it looks like I found my boat, and it's none of the above. It's a Cal 29. A little bigger than the others, but should still be manageable. By all accounts she should be stiff and well balanced, and a little faster.
...

The only iffy part was quite a lot of play in the rudder. It could be just the bolts holding the tiller, but then again could be something else. Could this be a serious issue?

...Cheers,
Alex.
Alex--

We owned a 1976 Cal 2-29 from inception through 2011, sailing her everywhere from San Francisco to Mexico and later on both the east and west coasts of Florida.

During the course of our ownership our rudder shaft eventually wore the rudder tube and became "Loose". (Some here have claimed that the shaft had bushings/bearings but that was not the case with our rudder--perhaps others.) The fix was pretty straight forward. We dropped the rudder, thoroughly waxed it and then covered it with bond breaker and then remounted it, blocking the blade in the proper position. While the blade was dismounted, we drilled roughly 3/16" diameter holes at roughly 90º intervals around the top of the tube, roughly 3" below the cockpit deck with a second row, offset from the first roughly 1" lower. With the rudder reinstalled in the tube, we created a "tinker's dam" around the shaft at the bottom of the tube with plasticine modeling clay. With that, one can inject thin epoxy into the tube until it begins to drip from the second, lower, "weep holes". With that, a little blob of modeling clay is pressed over each weep hole in turn until the epoxy cures. The epoxy will fill the interstitial space between the rudder shaft and the tube and, once cured, creates a firm mounting shaft for the rudder. A few twists of the rudder will free it and you're good to go. (We did ours in one go although you can also inject the epoxy in lifts, if necessary.)

We made the foregoing repair to our rudder in, roughly, 1989 and the rudder was still firm and functional when we sold the yacht in 2011. (Interestingly, the yacht has since been returned to San Francisco, now sailing out of Alameda.)

FWIW...
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  #46  
Old 11-19-2012
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re: First boat: Cal 2-27, Pearson 28 or Islander 28?

Thanks for advice on the rudder guys. I've done a bit or research after I posted and it does seem to be a common problem on Cals. I haven't seen any mention of bushings or bearings, but there were several methods suggested to fix it, from shoving pieces of a plastic coke bottle down the shaft, to epoxy injection, to wrapping the rudder shaft with UHMW tape. All told, it doesn't seem like a huge issue, and I'm glad to see confirmation of that here.

Rubber non-skid seems to be factory-installed, seems to be inset into the deck with small recessed water channels around the pieces. Did these boats really come from the factory like that?

Mast step looked fine, if a little weathered. It looked a lot like an aftermarket piece I've seen advertised on the net, basically a rectangular plate with sides that protruded about 1-1.5" from under the mast, bent upwards a little with holes for fittings in them. I was under impression old factory steps didn't have those fittings, so maybe it is an upgrade... Didn't look like stainless, more like aluminum, but I'm not sure.

The owner said he was moving on to a 35 footer, which I tend to believe, given that he seems to be really getting into racing now.

Survey is set for this Wed., I'll post the results.

Cheers for all the advice!

Alex.
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Old 11-22-2012
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re: First boat: Cal 2-27, Pearson 28 or Islander 28?

Well, it's done. Survey went well, didn't find any major issues. The sloppy rudder turned out to be just the loose tiller head. There was a little bit of play in the rudder itself when the boat was hauled out, but not excessive. There was also a good amount of blisters (about 100-150), but they were small, about the size of a dime, and the surveyor advised not to worry about them.

So, now I just need to get the boat to her new home across the bay. That should be an interesting experience for a first sail

Thanks for all your help guys, it was much appreciated.
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Old 11-22-2012
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re: First boat: Cal 2-27, Pearson 28 or Islander 28?

Hello. My first boat was a Cal 2 27.i bought it with no experience.no engine.good boat to learn. Fun and fast for its size.will definitely be good choice. The pearson 28 is also a great boat.i havent sailed on one but have on many others including the 29.i beleive the pearson performs better upwind, the cal downwind.
question? Is any of the boats actually sailing?you must consider the condition of rhe rig and deck.the 8 hp will be too small to move the cal specially if its rough.
Islanders had a lot of problems with blisters sometime in the 70s
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Old 11-22-2012
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re: First boat: Cal 2-27, Pearson 28 or Islander 28?

Sory didnt read all the posts. Cal 29, good for you sure you will love it.
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Old 11-23-2012
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re: First boat: Cal 2-27, Pearson 28 or Islander 28?

Alex--

A couple of thoughts now that the boat is yours.

1. Icebox Drain. The drain from the ice box discharges through a small tube into the bilge. If you are like most of us, "stuff" will be spilled on the bottom of the box and eventually make it's way into the bilge drain. That can lead to some pretty unpleasing smells. And, the drain allows the cold air to bleed out of the box reducing it's usefulness. We solved these issues by carving a wine-bottle cork to fit the drain hole and plugging it and adding a layer of cut to shape "DriDeck" on the bottom of the box, sitting on a 1/4" layer of shaped closed cell foam. These can be lifted out and cleaned easily and the box cleaned out with a sponge. The closed cell foam improves the performance of the box. Also, depending upon where you live, many markets carry "dry-ice" in a little sub-zero freezer near the front of the store. These will keep the box quite cold and yet do not make a mess as they thaw as will water. As for Ice, keep a could on 1/2 gallon milk jugs. Thoroughly cleaned out these make good water bottles that can be frozen in advance, keeping the box cold and providing good drinking water to boot. I had planned to one-day add a refrigeration unit under the box--there is room--but found the foregoing arrangement sufficiently satisfactory that I never got around to it--in 26 years.

2. Engine Bilge Sump. The bilge sump under the motor is separated from the rest of the bilge which is good as drips of oil, fuel, etc. do not mix with bilge water and so are not discharged from the yacht when/if the bilge pump kicks on. I made up a "mobile" bilge pump, just a small submersible pump, that I attached to a 1"x2" piece of lumber and fitted with a 6' or so 1/2" diameter tube and powered by Alligator clamps that I could temporarily connect to the ships batteries. Sump water was pumped into a bucket with a POL absorbent pad that seemed to collect the vast majority of oil after which the pad was placed in a plastic bag for shore side disposal and the water tossed overboard. This seemed to work very well as we very rarely observed any "rainbows" on the water after dumping the discharge.

3. Chain-plate deck penetration covers. Keep a close eye on the chain-plate backings, particularly for the lowers. The deck plates are famous for leaking and the plates are mounted in positions where it it difficult to inspect the fastenings to the bulk-heads, but they must be inspected periodically and repaired as necessary. Crevice corrosion has been a problem with the chain-plates on these boats if they are not kept dry and clean which requires periodic replacement of the sealant under the deck plates.

Good luck with the new boat...
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