Pros and cons of steel sailboats - Page 151 - SailNet Community

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  #1501  
Old 10-05-2013
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Re: Pros and cons of steel sailboats

Back when I built kayaks I was a tad more nimble and could stand in my 16 footer My dingy on davits for years has been a 9ft Minto Let me tell you it got tippery aand tippary. Now I have a 10 ft davidson and I'm becoming concerned with its stability. Dog paddling while looking at my really pretty tender drifting away leaves me cold.As an old fart,I like the concept of big beam wrapped around a pramish bow. Just sayin.
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  #1502  
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Thumbs up Re: Pros and cons of steel sailboats

Quote:
Originally Posted by Capt Len View Post
Back when I built kayaks I was a tad more nimble and could stand in my 16 footer My dingy on davits for years has been a 9ft Minto Let me tell you it got tippery aand tippary. Now I have a 10 ft davidson and I'm becoming concerned with its stability. Dog paddling while looking at my really pretty tender drifting away leaves me cold.As an old fart,I like the concept of big beam wrapped around a pramish bow. Just sayin.
I relate to that
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  #1503  
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Re: Pros and cons of steel sailboats

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Originally Posted by Capt Len View Post
Back when I built kayaks I was a tad more nimble and could stand in my 16 footer My dingy on davits for years has been a 9ft Minto Let me tell you it got tippery aand tippary. Now I have a 10 ft davidson and I'm becoming concerned with its stability. Dog paddling while looking at my really pretty tender drifting away leaves me cold.As an old fart,I like the concept of big beam wrapped around a pramish bow. Just sayin.
Whether tippy dinghy or kayak , tying a tight midship line to the dock or boat, lets you put all the weight you want to on that side with no chance of capsizing ,making it much easier and safer to get in and out. If the dock has the same freeboard as your dingy or kayak, that makes it impossible to tip either way.
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Re: Pros and cons of steel sailboats

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Originally Posted by bfloyd4445 View Post
I am aware of that and currently own two al boats but I can't help but feel steel may be better in most ways and definitely is for larger boats. I also see a few ancient old woody's still out there working. I've hit stuff with wood fiberglass and aluminum and found the al less likely to be holed but much harder and expensive to repair. Glass and wood will flex nicely takeing up much of the impact while aluminum just crushes.
The bottom line is the boat design and quality of manufacture that is most important. If that wasn't so vessels like the wetsnail 32 would not have achieved such a world wide reputation for getting there crew home while other similar vessel have the opposite reputaqtion
Steel is even harder to hole and much easier to repair, especially a long way from civilization. I can do it with a 100 amp alternator run off my engine.

This reminds me of a cartoon a fisherman told me about , a picture of a guy in a dinghy in a Honolulu shirt asking a native on the beach in a grass skirt, with a spear in his hand, and a bone thru his nose:
"Any body here weldum aluminum?"
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Re: Pros and cons of steel sailboats

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Originally Posted by smackdaddy View Post
Okay - then answer them. You're just doing the same old thing.
Exactly , answering questions accurately ,with experience based answers, something you seem to have a problem with, having no such experience of your own. Perhaps it is the accuracy of my answers which bothers you.
For that, I'm flattered!
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Re: Pros and cons of steel sailboats

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Brent
How about 8 gauge and minimal internal bracing?
Way to heavy for a dinghy. As with most 16 gauge aluminium runabouts , most internal bracing is unnecessary. The seats and floatation compartments should be all the bracing you need.
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Re: Pros and cons of steel sailboats

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Originally Posted by Jeff_H View Post
Brent:

Can you weld 16 ga.? Most of those light gauge boats seem to be riveted.
A skilled guy with a tig can. Too thin for mig. Rivets would be a good way to put seats and floatation compartments in.
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Re: Pros and cons of steel sailboats

I'd like to stay away from rivets if I can. They don't look good to me and I can't see them fitting the look I am after in my peen pod. I am not pretending this is a boat for anyone but me, although we have four "orders" so far including my own. No price yet so you know how firm those orders are.

I really wanted a PT 11 Russell Brown boat. But they are works of art, like fine furniture. And a wee bit short on LOA for my tall frame. My boat will be such that I can chuck a couple crab pots in it without worrying about scuffing it up.
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  #1509  
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Re: Pros and cons of steel sailboats

Take a thin piece of metal and twist it. The edges want to be longer than the middle. The middle buckles. When the weld shrinks the edges, it makes things worse. Topside plates , having a longitudinal curve in them, and minimum twist ,benefit from this shrinkage , resulting in a slight compound curve. On my 36 footers ,after final welding you can see about 1 1/4 inch of curve between the sheer and the chine from this effect.
With twisted plates, common on the bow of many hard chine designs ( like Colvins), the distortion of these plates can be difficult to deal with in heavier plate . Far more so in thinner plate. No, a wooden mold wont stop it. Best to minimize the twist in the design stage. Bringing the centreline up closer to the seam is one way to do it.
For seats and floatation, my current dingy uses longitudinal floatation chambers. This not only stiffens things up a lot , but lets me put removable seats anywhere I want them, balancing any other cargo or passengers I may have aboard. It is the best arrangement I have seen in over 40 years of cruising. For aluminium, it takes a bit more fitting , but adds a lot of stiffness, and can be done in 16 gauge, riveted to the top sides, and mostly left open on the bottom, with foam under .
On my aluminium dinghy, I had a midships seat, 16 gauge , 2-90 degree bends a foot apart on top, and 2-90s with 1 inch flanges on the bottom with foam inside, resting on a couple of tabs on the top sides. There is a photo of it on the origamiboats site.
It was nowhere as handy as the longitudinal floatation chambers, with the removable seats.

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This post is aimed at others seeking such info, not at people like Bob, who criticise me for not responding, then criticize me for doing so, when I do .

Last edited by Brent Swain; 10-05-2013 at 08:29 PM.
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Re: Pros and cons of steel sailboats

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Originally Posted by bobperry View Post
I'd like to stay away from rivets if I can. They don't look good to me and I can't see them fitting the look I am after in my peen pod. I am not pretending this is a boat for anyone but me, although we have four "orders" so far including my own. No price yet so you know how firm those orders are.

I really wanted a PT 11 Russell Brown boat. But they are works of art, like fine furniture. And a wee bit short on LOA for my tall frame. My boat will be such that I can chuck a couple crab pots in it without worrying about scuffing it up.
You will be amazed at how little maintenance it will have. Nothing to do to it but use it.
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