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-   -   Selling a Motorsailer (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/buying-boat-articles/19519-selling-motorsailer.html)

Jon Shattuck 08-09-2001 08:00 PM

Selling a Motorsailer
 
<HTML><P>I would like to sell my 29 foot Lancer, which is a motorailer. Who would be the best broker to handle this boat? I'm based near Cape Canaveral, FL.&nbsp;</P><P><STRONG>Jon Shattuck responds: <BR></STRONG>Thank you for your inquiry. Selecting a broker is a personal matter, so I would feel more comfortable offering some general suggestions on how to find the best broker for you, your area, and your boat, rather than simply recommend a specific broker.<BR><BR>As smaller boats tend to sell closer to home, you should consider researching boats of similar size offered by brokers in your neighborhood.&nbsp;To get you started on that, I conducted a&nbsp;search on <A class=articlelink href="http://www.boatsearch.com">www.boatsearch.com</A> for similar sized boats—27 feet to 32 feet for sale in Florida by brokers—and got a list of&nbsp;35 boats.&nbsp;If you do this and then click&nbsp;on the listings for sale near your homeport, you can identify the active local brokers.<BR><BR>You should also check your local sailing magazines, classified sections of your local newspaper, and other print sources.&nbsp;Ask around too. Personal referrals from happy customers are one of your best resources.<BR><BR>Almost all brokers specialize in a type or types of boats.&nbsp;A local powerboat dealer will not be the right broker to list your boat.&nbsp; Look for the broker whose inventory of brokerage boats best fits the kind of boat you've got.&nbsp;Once you have identified some candidates, call them.&nbsp;Ask how they work, what their marketing efforts consist of, and if they think they can do a good job for you given the kind of boat you've got.&nbsp;The odds are that you will connect with a broker this way, which is a good first step toward creating a successful seller-broker relationship.<BR><BR>After that, work with your broker to help market your boat. Prep it for sale, and help him or her&nbsp;create a complete equipment list. These kinds of details are spelled out in "Seller Tips" at BoatSearch.com.<BR><BR>Keep in mind that the Lancer 29 is not your average boat, so it may take some time for your broker to bring a buyer to the table, but rest assured, there is a buyer for every boat out there. It's just a matter of how long it takes for them to show up.<BR><BR>My last suggestion is&nbsp;don't stop using your boat once you put it on the market!&nbsp;Most boat sellers stop using their boats when they put them on the market, which tends to lead to a&nbsp;dirty, neglected appearance, and there's nothng that kills the first impression for prospective buyers. A clean, orderly boat is an easy sell.&nbsp;A tired water toy will simply sit and sit and sit, and it won't look appealing.&nbsp;Happy selling!<BR></P></HTML>


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