Any Cal 22 Owners? - Page 9 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > Boat Builders Row > Cal
 Not a Member? 


Like Tree1Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #81  
Old 11-05-2011
Pneumatic's Avatar
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Eugene, Oregon
Posts: 10
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Pneumatic is on a distinguished road
Howdy fellow cal 22 owners

Haven't been here for a while so I thought I would post some pictures of my cal 22 and possibly share some of my knowledge of the cal 22 that I have acquired over the last two seasons of sailing "pneuma".
The pictures can be viewed by looking at the album that's part of my profile. I tried to upload to the post but I'm still not able to do it. I must be doing something wrong because I see others have been able to post pictures.
One thing I can tell you is that the boat performs well and can hold her own with much faster boats. Only shortcoming is that with the shoal draft keel I can't point as well as other race boats with longer fin keels. I've had her up to 7.0 knots on several occasions as measured with my GPS. And that was reefed!
I have found that she does have a lot of weather helm and have found that she's more balanced with the main reefed and the 130% genoa all the way out in winds up to about 18-20 knots. More than that and it's time to start furling up the genoa.
The wife and I made our own sails with kits we bought through sailrite. The were custom cut to my specifications because I was try to get as much sail area as I could. In retrospect, I think I should've made the main a tad smaller. In light wind conditions the increased sail area helps a lot. But once the wind gets over 10 knots, she gets some weather helm and heels more than I would like. Reefing balance her out right away but there is some loss of performance.
I recently installed a back stay adjuster and have started experimenting bending the mast to try and balance her. I'm still working to get the rigging tuned to get the most out of the rear stay adjuster.
I can think of several improvements I would like to make that might help her sail better. First, I would like to add another reefing point about 1' above the foot of the main sail. I think this would help to balance the helm with out a loss of performance during moderate wind conditions. Second would be a rigid boom vang to make reefing easier. Third would be to organize all my lines to lead back to the cockpit.
That's all for now. I look forward from hearing from others and would be especially interested to learn how others have install deck organizers and arraigned their lines.
PierreMundo likes this.
__________________
Have a great day.....unless you have other plans.
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #82  
Old 11-06-2011
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 40
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
seb5thman is on a distinguished road
Cal-22

Me too, its been awhile since I've visited this site. Had another great season on my Cal-22, maybe 50+ days on the water. Not as much as previous summers, but still not bad. I've got a couple of basic questions that I keep getting differing opinions on, so I'll try you guys for your thoughts.
1st.....I have a traveller that runs across the rear rail of the cockpit. What exactly is the traveller used for? I know if controls the boom, but when should I have it sheeted to windward, leeward, etc.
2nd....mast up or down for storage? The lake I'm on has winter storage and I can keep the mast up all season. I'm keeping it up right now, but are there advantages to one over the other?
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #83  
Old 11-06-2011
Pneumatic's Avatar
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Eugene, Oregon
Posts: 10
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Pneumatic is on a distinguished road
The traveler is basically used to control the amount of twist in the main sail. The traveler is used in conjunction with the main sheet to trim the main and control how much the boom will lift and thus, determining how much the upper part of the main sail will twist to leeward. Once the amount of twist in the sail is set, the traveler is sheeted in and out to trim the main sail in our out without changing the amount of twist in the sail as the boat's position relative to the wind changes.
In general, during light air, the traveler should be to windward to allow for more lift of the boom do to less downward force on the boom. During stronger wind, the traveler should be set more to leeward so that the main sheet is pulling straight down on the boom and therefore flattening the main. But you should really be setting your traveler to provide correct sail trim for the conditions. For this you will need tell-tails on the leech of the main.
Ideally, you should be setting the traveler so that the tell-tails on the leech of the main are streaming aft. If the upper tell-tail is not streaming aft but stalled instead, you might need to ease the upper part of the main by adding twist to the sail until the tell-tail streams back. You add twist to the sail by easing the main sheet out and then sheeting the traveler to windward until the main is trimmed properly.
The problem with travelers mounted at the stern of the boat is that distance the boom can trimmed outward using the traveler is much less than a traveler mounted further forward. The amount of degrees the boom can be adjusted by the traveler, for a given arc length as determined by the length of the traveler, is greater the closer the traveler is to the pivot point of the boom (my head hurts). So, once the main sail is eased out by use of the traveler and the traveler reaches the end of its travel, you must then begin to ease out the main sheet to trim the main out any further. Then the boom will begin to lift and the traveler will have less effect on controlling the twist of the main sail. This is where the boom vang comes into play. Now you will need to use the boom vang to control the downward pull on the boom.With a traveler mount further forward, you can ease the main out much further before you need to use the boom vang to control sail twist.
As for how to store your boat, I will defer to others since I've never had to make that decision.
__________________
Have a great day.....unless you have other plans.
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #84  
Old 11-07-2011
NotQuiteCapnRon's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Rivals, Kentucky
Posts: 71
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
NotQuiteCapnRon is on a distinguished road
That is a good explanation of traveler use. Now that bad news....the traveler on our boat is not very efficient. As mentioned the range is limited, beyond that, the pin system makes using the traveller in such an efficient manner as described difficult. If you are sailing on the same tack for a good length of time, you can set the traveller for the wind conditions and work the main sheet. If you are tacking a lot, single handed, in a bit of wind, its pretty difficult to set or adjust a Cal 22 traveller trim properly. Having said that, I still try to work mine for optimal trim whenever I am physically able.

Another basic rule involving the traveller/main sheet for trim, is to get the boom and your top batten on the same line or parallel. You can look up the sail and accomplish this. That is usually a good starting point. Then you can fine tune to your tell tales.

I can't think of any reason not to leave the mast up if your going to store the boat outside and you are not traveling anywhere. When I pull mine I put it indoors, so I'm dropping the mast. I've left it in the water for a couple of years....never dropped the mast while it was in the water. The Pearson 26 I race on comes out of the the Ohio and sits right there next to the river with the mast up until next season. Perhaps others have a different experience.

Ron
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #85  
Old 11-07-2011
Pneumatic's Avatar
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Eugene, Oregon
Posts: 10
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Pneumatic is on a distinguished road
Thanks Ron. One thing I would disagree with though. If you are on the same tack for a good length of time, I would set the main and traveler for correct sail trim, then I would work the traveler. That way you maintain the same sail twist as you adjust the main in and out.
I must have a different traveler than you. Mine doesn't have pin stops but rather, mine has a block and cam cleat on each side to adjust the traveler. If you look at my profile picture you can probably make it out. I would think the setup I have would be much easier to adjust than the pin stop type. I had a pin stop type on my last boat and I agree, it was a hassle to try and adjust.
Although the traveler location on our boats is not idea, I would not want to give up the large open cockpit. With it's current location, the traveler is effective from a close reach to close hauled. On a beam reach to a run, I rely on the boom vang. Where as if the traveler were located on top of the cabin, it would be effective from close hauled to a beam reach. The range of adjustment I lose having the traveler at the stern of the boat is worth the trade-off of having a large open cockpit. If I were a hard core racer, well that would be a different story.

Martin
__________________
Have a great day.....unless you have other plans.
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #86  
Old 11-07-2011
NotQuiteCapnRon's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Rivals, Kentucky
Posts: 71
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
NotQuiteCapnRon is on a distinguished road
"One thing I would disagree with though. If you are on the same tack for a good length of time, I would set the main and traveler for correct sail trim, then I would work the traveler. That way you maintain the same sail twist as you adjust the main in and out."
Totally agree that would be the way to go with your improved traveler system, but you are not dealing with the original traveler like most of us. I would like to see your system, as I would like to improve mine. I think that is also a light to medium air situation with the length of the traveler track. I sail in a lot of wind without hesitation...the traveler is not even close to being able to dump enough wind to prevent rounding up in a good puff....even when I'm reefed down tight.

Working the original traveler to trim, dump air, center the boom, add twist....means lifting the pin, sliding pin to desired position, slide a car under wind pressure with your hand, repositioning the other pin, and repeat for each lift or header, all the while handling the tiller. It's difficult to efficiently accomplish that in light winds while single handling...forget it when it get over 10 or 12 knots on a beat. I lash my tiller and do the best I can with the traveler, but I'm on a tiny lake with swirly conditions...my hands need to be on the tiller and the main sheet.

I totally agree on the cockpit...I would not give up the cockpit space either, but I would like to hear where you got the rigging and how you reconfigured the existing traveler. I've thought of a couple of ways to improve mine with some cam cleats, but I'd like to see something tried and true. Are you using the original curved traveler track?

Thanks,

Ron
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #87  
Old 11-12-2011
Pneumatic's Avatar
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Eugene, Oregon
Posts: 10
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Pneumatic is on a distinguished road
I believe my traveler is original. But I have noticed in pictures of other Cal 22's that I have a different stern pulpit and traveler than other Cal 22's. My spars are different also. I believe this due to my boat being a later '89 model. The rear traveler is a Schafer brand with pulleys and cam cleats. I don't have a good picture of it but you might be able to see it in one of my profile pictures.
__________________
Have a great day.....unless you have other plans.
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #88  
Old 11-12-2011
NotQuiteCapnRon's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Rivals, Kentucky
Posts: 71
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
NotQuiteCapnRon is on a distinguished road
Martin,

Wow! Your boat looks really clean and beautiful. Awesome! Do you only get her out for parades?

I've seen a lot of Cal 22 photos. None have had a traveler system like yours. The track on mine is mounted through the fiberglass to the top of the transom, and that is what I have seen in other photos too. Your track is straight. Mine is curved. The curve and track size limits the options for hardware to update the system on mine. From what I could see, yours is mounted to the stanchions? Perhaps I will bag the entire system and look for a straight track that I can mount between the stanchions. If you get a chance to shoot a good photo of your system, I would really appreciated seeing it.

It was my understanding that the last Cal 22's were made in the fall of 88...you have hull numbers that indicate yours was built in 89? I think someone mentioned that some Cal 22's were finished after the Cal went under...I wonder if yours could be in that group...improved traveler...different spars. (they appear more robust). Your gooseneck is definitely hardier than mine.

Thanks,

Ron
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #89  
Old 11-12-2011
Pneumatic's Avatar
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Eugene, Oregon
Posts: 10
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Pneumatic is on a distinguished road
I will try to post a picture of the traveler system soon.
I must admit that I'm really not sure if it's a '88 or a '89. The hull number is; CABK0215E889. Is it a '88 or and '89?
__________________
Have a great day.....unless you have other plans.
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #90  
Old 11-12-2011
NotQuiteCapnRon's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Rivals, Kentucky
Posts: 71
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
NotQuiteCapnRon is on a distinguished road
I borrowed this from another post at Sailnet. If I have broken the code correctly, your boat was manufactured in May of 88, but was an 89 model. Check my work.

New format

Optional, as of January 1, 1984, was a new-format version, simply called new format. This format became mandatory August 1, 1984, replacing the two previous formats.

• In the new format, characters 1, 2, and 3 of the HIN are still the Manufacturer's Identification Code. Sometimes the letters of this manufacturer's code easily identify the manufacturer. In other cases they bear no relationship to the manufacturer's name.

• Characters 4 through 8 are still the alpha-numeric serial number assigned at the discretion of the manufacturer. Some of these manufacturer-assigned characters are laid out very logically, and some defy logic. On a 37-footer, which is hull #51, the number might be 37051; but it also might be a set of characters that only makes sense to the builder.

• Character 9 indicates the month of manufacture or certification. A designates January, B February, and so on through December (a big improvement over the original lettering system that started in August).

• Character 10 is a numeral that indicates the last digit of the year of manufacture or certification.

• Characters 11 and 12 indicate the model year. Thus, 82 would indicate the boat's model year was 1982.

• Some manufacturers also add additional information after the HIN, such as -27, which might indicate that this is their 27-foot model.

After August 1, l984, boat manufacturers were required to display two identical Hull Identification Numbers, one on the outside starboard side of the transom, within two inches of the top of the transom, gunwale, or hull-to-deck joint, whichever is lowest. On boats where this is impossible, such as double-enders, the HIN must be on the starboard side of the hull, within one foot of the stern and within two inches from the top of the hull, gunwale, or deck joint.

The second HIN must be inside the hull in an unexposed location or beneath a fitting or item of hardware.

The HIN characters, both inside and outside the hull, must be no smaller than ¼-inch high, but many manufacturers make them much larger. It is illegal for anyone to alter or remove one of these numbers without written permission of the Commandant of the Coast Guard.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Cal 20-- Excellent Starter Boat Jim H Cal 8 03-17-2013 11:21 AM
Cal 39 & Bill Lapworth Bluesmoods Boat Review and Purchase Forum 24 05-07-2012 04:57 PM
Cal 39 owners techjunc Cal 3 05-05-2012 06:34 PM
Need a owner's manual for Cal 27 "Pop-top" johnmcalester Cal 7 07-21-2009 09:19 PM
Cal 2-25 Owners Manual Needed kfgezella General Discussion (sailing related) 2 03-15-2009 01:55 AM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:07 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.