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-   -   How large of an outboard motor do I need? (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/cal/50470-how-large-outboard-motor-do-i-need.html)

coldsteel 01-13-2009 05:30 PM

How large of an outboard motor do I need?
 
Aloha,

I have a 1974 Cal T4, 24', sailboat here in Hawaii. It is a real fixer upper and does not have an outboard motor. I am unsure how big or how small of an outboard I should get for this size of boat. I have a friend who has an old Johnson 50hp, with a 15" shaft. I think that the motor is too big and the shaft is too short for the boat. The boat has not been changed where the motor goes on the transom. Should I change that and put in a lift up motor mount? Please let me know what you think about this.

Mahalo

mrwuffles 01-13-2009 06:09 PM

your not going to be able to pull up a 50 on a lift up motor mount, you should probably put 10-15 hp if you don't have too strong a current. It will also burn less gas.

Faster 01-13-2009 06:33 PM

8 - 10 HP should be plenty unless you are having to regularly fight strong winds and currents to leave your mooring/marina area. The 4 stokes in this power range have a lot of push, are much quieter and burn cleaner.

A long shaft is certainly recommended for a transom mount esp if you are having to motor in sizable waves (as I'd guess you might). Not sure of your setup, but a lifting mount may be indicated if you would otherwise drag part of the motor in the water when sailing.

That 50 hp motor is totally not what you want!

sailingfool 01-13-2009 06:57 PM

Given you are in a budget boat, I'd recommend you find a used 4-6HP 2cycle and mount it in the normal location. Get a long shaft if you can find one. This will be enough - you will find pleny of opportunities to spend more money on your boat, if you feel you can afford a bigger, new 4 stroke engine, you should buy yourself some new sails instead.

HerbDB 01-13-2009 07:01 PM

I used to have a Catalina 25 and used a Honda 7.5Hp long shaft motor on it. Plenty of power to push the boat at hull speed plus it had a charging lead to keep the battery charged.

coldsteel 01-13-2009 07:24 PM

Thanks for the information. So if I get a used 4-6 hp outboard, long shaft if possible, that should be enough to get me in and out of the boat slip and out into Pearl Harbor? I am not planning on taking her out into blue water until I get some courses behind me and some time sailing her. What would you say the Max would be for this small of a boat?

camaraderie 01-13-2009 07:49 PM

4-6 is sufficient...7.5-9.9 would provide an extra margin of safety in stronger winds and currents. Longshaft is the ONLY type to get if you want the prop to stay in the water in a chop. Enjoy!

bubb2 01-13-2009 08:26 PM

Stay with the 50 horse. It should weigh enough to make the stern squat down enough to keep the prop in the water. On the days with no wind you can go water skiing. I think that the extra weight of the 50 should only cost you 1 to 2 knots of sailing speed.

On second thought, stay with advice given in the other posts above.

mrwuffles 01-13-2009 08:33 PM

On some small boats with a short shaft if you go to the bow something comes out of the water and makes a lot of noise I noticed this when I was catching or unhooking mooring lines on my boat. So now I have a long shaft.

Faster 01-13-2009 08:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bubb2 (Post 431625)
Stay with the 50 horse. It should weigh enough to make the stern squat down enough to keep the prop in the water. On the days with no wind you can go water skiing. I think that the extra weight of the 50 should only cost you 1 to 2 knots of sailing speed.
.

Sometimes I think you're just evil, bubb!;) :)


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