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  #21  
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Re: Don't be so hard on the new guys

Quote:
Originally Posted by chef2sail View Post
Seriously, back a sailboat with a square stern into 20 knots in a straight line
Yes, seriously! Obviously driving boat in a straight line forward did not work very well either
I am not trying to pick on OP, just to suggest that there is another way to overcome the problem, which seems to be working well as another poster suggested. If one is having problems driving boat into the wind backwards, you can always unfurl a little bit of the jib with both sheets tight. It will work as a wind-wane and keep the bow pointed downwind
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  #22  
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Re: Don't be so hard on the new guys

that IS a technique to be used...

its kind of a modifided med mooring maneuever...

however the most obvious thing to consider is how your boat backs up, this needs to be tested before...

if your boat backs to either side it(most) makes using this technique almost impossible or very hard at the least.

the really good part about this technique is you are helming over the turning point therefore lessening the leverage effect the wind has over the length of the hull in normal point into the wind mooring maneuvers.

however 2 huge drawbacks to this

1. its easier to damage your stern or rudder if using big mooring balls, pilings, etc
2. if your not careful with your lines this is the best way to foul a prop. yes it sounds obvious but how many times have you let go of a line, or been careless especially if your having fun or getting distracted by a babe, or your crew or the scenery etc.

small boat mooring go by the side...like mentioned before, and slide up to the mooring, lower freeboard helps you here as well as having extra time and boat length to attach to.
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  #23  
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Re: Don't be so hard on the new guys

Agree with Alex_sauvage - yes, seriously. Easier to manoeuvre dead slow into the wind in reverse when your bow doesn't get blown off by the wind, as it does in fwd. Plus the communications and geometry advantages mentioned previously. Works great in any typical modern monohull with short keel & spade rudder (except in sizable waves or big current).
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Re: Don't be so hard on the new guys

Quote:
Originally Posted by chef2sail View Post
Seriously, back a sailboat with a square stern into 20 knots in a straight line

Thats the way i do it single handing.



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Re: Don't be so hard on the new guys

I tried both - forward and reverse. Cant say either are better or worse - just depends on the situation. I don't think I would start trying in reverse, but it's an OK option if you miss. As some have mentioned, having the proper person try to catch and tie up to the mooring is also important. The mistake we made a long time on our boat is me handling the driving and my wife handling the lines, anchor, etc. She was more comfortable doing those jobs than handling the wheel. I guess she did not have the confidence to drive a 46' boat in tight quarters. At one point we were trying to anchor at night close to a bunch of other boats with a limited amount of maneuvering room between boats, shore and a reef. Our regular anchors didn't work, so I had to duck below to get our back-up Fortress ready and my wife had to drive in the meantime. She nearly freaked out but did extremely well, considering the circumstances. These types of situations didn't bolster her confidence though and driving at sea doesn't provide that confidence. So I am still the main person to drive while we dock or moor, while we switch during anchoring maneuvers. Knowing what to do with the mooring pennant also helps. We had one of our earlier mooring attempts where I presumed that my wife knew what to do with the pennant. I had reminded her to have our docking line below the life lines, to have the boat hook low and to grab the pennant early. But she ended up having to let go several times because she kept trying to hook it on the cleat or to tie the docking line on the pennant. i had to remind her to just pull the docking line through the loop in the pennant, which also helps when getting underway later. Training under non-stress circumstances, loads and loads of communication and having the right person at the right job and talking problems through afterwards seem to me the best ingredients for success. Don't let others rattle you - they are not on your boat nor are they in the same situation. You were successful in the end and surely will get better as time goes on and you get through more learning situations.
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Re: Don't be so hard on the new guys

Quote:
Originally Posted by alex_sauvage View Post
Yes, seriously! Obviously driving boat in a straight line forward did not work very well either
I am not trying to pick on OP, just to suggest that there is another way to overcome the problem, which seems to be working well as another poster suggested. If one is having problems driving boat into the wind backwards, you can always unfurl a little bit of the jib with both sheets tight. It will work as a wind-wane and keep the bow pointed downwind
Don't have a furler on the Lady all hank on.
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Re: Don't be so hard on the new guys

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Originally Posted by ltgoshen View Post
Don't have a furler on the Lady all hank on.
I am just guessing, but if your boat has "hank on" foresail, it probably does not have "big, square stern" of the modern production boat
In any case that was just an additional advice to the comment that it is impossible to drive the boat with "big, square stern" backward into the wind.
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Re: Don't be so hard on the new guys

Regarding onlookers #1: Whatever they do or think is up to them and it doesn't really matter to me. However, I can control my perception and reaction.

Regarding onlookers #2: When I see them, I simply imagine their heads to be cabbage. I'm not worried about what a cabbage thinks of me.

Regarding onlookers #3: If an onlooker sees that I could use some help and offers it, I appreciate it and it makes me feel better about the world and I've learned something. If the onlooker doesn't offer, I assume he doesn't know any better than I do. I figure that onlookers have the best, non-judgmental intentions.

Regarding onlookers #4: I try to be an onlooker as much as I can. Sometimes I'll go out of my way to watch. Not because I want to judge, but because I want to learn. I have found that the best way for me to learn is to watch and emulate. If whoever I'm watching needs help, I'm glad to assist. Again, no judgement or criticism. I realize that I'm just a cabbage that is sometimes useful.
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  #29  
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Re: Don't be so hard on the new guys

Regarding backing up to it, if there is enough room, there is another option. Come at it down wind. You can control how you approach it and come in very slow so that you can go into reverse and maintain position. You could much more easily just sit there and let them take their time getting the pendant this way. Obviously this won't work in many situations though if the anchorage is crowded.

The real key is having a good hooker. Gotta get that pendant as quick as possible - even if you just get one line through to start, it will hold it while you get the other ready.
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