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-   -   Ideal boat size for crewed charter? (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/chartering/44937-ideal-boat-size-crewed-charter.html)

mtschindler 07-13-2008 09:17 AM

Ideal boat size for crewed charter?
 
I understand that there are too many factors to answer that with one size.
Here's where I'm coming from. I'm thinking of buying a boat and using it for crewed charters. I think - and please correct me if I'm wrong - that 3 cabin - 50 or so feet would be ideal. Two cabins for paying guests, either two couples or family of four and the crew. I think having more cabins either cramps the style or on a larger boat often those cabins go unsold.
If you have other insights into the subject please by all means share it...

If anyone has first hand experience in doing just that please chime in here or email me at mtschindler_at_yahoo.com

funsailthekeys 07-18-2008 10:45 AM

charter boats
 
My experience is with a a 60' Morgan, it had 4 cabins and 4 heads. The largest cabin was aft and cost the most. There were 2 forward cabins ,(a bunk bed arrangement) and lastly the crew quarters or I say crews closet. The saloon and galley area was fairly spacious. Lots of storage for food and refrigeration. The draft was 7' and weighed 66,000 lbs but never really proved a problem. You can get a 40' cat that has 4 cabins also. Each has their issues the cost will be about the same for either. Hope this helps.

chrondi 07-23-2008 02:22 PM

I would suggest that you do it for fun and not as a serious business venture. The size of the yacht should be in the range of 40-50 ft. (i.e. with 3-4 cabins, providing for 8-10 pax) which means over 200,000, but financially it is the opposite of a sound investment. Charter contract opportunities will be scarce when the boat gets older (after 3 yrs.) and the expenses will keep growing while the value of the vessel will rapidly decrease, notwithstanding the usual incidents at sea. On the other hand, how much experienced are you as a sailor to handle all that successfully?

Zanshin 07-24-2008 05:45 AM

Many of the 50+ foot boats have a "crew cabin" forward - this is really a glorified closet with a head and sink, but it leaves a lot of room for paying guests! The Jeanneau 52.2 as well as Beneteaus over 50 have this room.

mtschindler 07-24-2008 09:13 PM

Thanks to all for reply. Chrondi - I've been sailing since I was 8, started on Optimist, then Finn then 1/2 ton boats and finished with a Tall Ship, however I don't have any experience cruising. I used to own a 28' Irwin in mid 80's but didn't spend much time cruising. I'm looking for ways to help with the expenses of owning the boat. At the moment I spend the best cruising months in UT teaching skiing, and would like to continue that, so I'm hoping to explore possibilities of chartering in Europe. I'm not sure how viable option it is but time will tell. Don't know if that's correct or not, but think that 3 cabin - two for the guest would make the most sense, otherwise you spend time with empty bunks. I like Bavaria 50 with one cabin forward and two aft. Bavaria also looks like a well built boat, I think better built than Beneteau or Jeanneau.
What you'll think?

chrondi 08-01-2008 04:49 PM

Bavarias are spacy boats and I keep wondering how on earth their German boatbuilder can still keep the cost so low through mass construction and mechanical means. Nevertheless, for a little extra money Jeanneau boats are much better at sailing. In the past I used to think that Beneteaus (not the Cyclades range) are better quality but it seems that this is not the case. All other major Italian, French, German and Scandinavian yards are much more expensive.

harryrezz 09-29-2008 09:22 PM

You're on the right track size-wise. Any more than 4 guests and you're asking for conflicts and a LOT of work. Don't plan on getting rich - but for help in offsetting the cost of ownership it works. The hard part is in getting the guests in the first place. Taking care of them and showing them a good time is easy! You don't need a new boat - mine is 31 - but you MUST maintain it properly and make certain you have good gear and the proper "toys" and connections for fresh seafood and SCUBA if they want it. I've been at it for 6 years now and am having fun ... but for me it is strictly a source of additional funds, not a sole source of income ... and my boat is paid for.
Feel free to drop me a line if you have specific questions.

cherev 10-05-2008 06:20 PM

38'+ catamarans are better, since owner and crew can be in one hull and the paying public in the other. Don't buy a new boat, but as said everything the 'guests' will lay their hands upon must always work and be operable by apes. You may need comic illustrations in the heads.

This is not a path to a Taipan's empire - may be more fun to have a beach bar that also runs day-trips to off-the-beaten-track destinations. A little weather with first-timers, or guests who bring some nascent conflict with them, can really bring on the ugly in confined spaces.

camaraderie 10-05-2008 09:17 PM

mts...two issues occur to me...but I do think you have the size right and the need for equalized guest accomodations.
1. You will need a captains license and appropriate commercial insurance. In Europe you may face a whole bunch more requirements.
2. I don't think you will be allowed to set up a charter business easily in Europe unless you are a Euro citizen. You will have to leave the EU personally due to the Schengen treaty after 90 days and stay OUT for 90 days... and the boat will need to go to a non EU country every 18 months.

mtschindler 10-19-2008 07:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by camaraderie (Post 380042)
mts...two issues occur to me...but I do think you have the size right and the need for equalized guest accomodations.
1. You will need a captains license and appropriate commercial insurance. In Europe you may face a whole bunch more requirements.
2. I don't think you will be allowed to set up a charter business easily in Europe unless you are a Euro citizen. You will have to leave the EU personally due to the Schengen treaty after 90 days and stay OUT for 90 days... and the boat will need to go to a non EU country every 18 months.

As the luck may have it I've dual citizenship and one of them is EU.
I did look more into chartering in Europe and as you said there is a lot of red tape with that - in particular in Greece. Oh well - plan B.
For now I'm just going to try to sail as much as I can. I'm getting all my experience verified.
One question - I used to own a small Irwin when I lived in Florida. I don't have any documentation for that - and when I called the State of Florida they said that they just now are moving some recent records to computers, but since Florida doesn't charge personal property tax on the boat they don't have any record or me owning a boat - who would have that? I've no clue what the registration was.

Mark


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