Another First Time BVI Charter - Page 2 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > Out There > Chartering
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #11  
Old 08-29-2009
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Miami, Florida
Posts: 38
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
SeanConnett is on a distinguished road
The first time we chartered in the BVI, a friend recommended Horizon Yacht Charters to us. My girlfriend and I chartered a Bavaria 32 for the two of us and there was not a single problem. HYC stocked the boat for us and every system on the boat was in good working order. The whole HYC team was professional, polite and made us feel very comfortable. I also did most of the sailing single handed and found the Bavaria a good boat to do that with.
HYC is on Nanny Cay, just west of of Road Town and the facilities are great. The hotel on the Cay is a nice place to stay the first night before getting on the boat in the morning, which is just a short walk down the dock.
We were so pleased with HYC that the next year we went back with two other couples and chartered a 46' Bavaria. We chose to stock the boat ourselves that time which gave us more options at the grocery store in Road Town. I own a boat now and that may delay my next charter trip to the BVI but as soon as I can, I'll be back down there and if it's not on my own boat, it will be with Horizon Yacht Charters.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #12  
Old 09-01-2009
s/v 'Bout Time
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 177
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 6
malyea is on a distinguished road
Love this forum! Thanks to all who've taken the time to share. Can't wait to castoff. Will probably go Moorings and will likely provision our self - maybe use the 'split provision option'.

Thanks guys!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #13  
Old 09-01-2009
roline's Avatar
Cal 9.2 SilverSwan
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: East Tennessee
Posts: 272
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 15
roline is on a distinguished road
We did a 2 week bare boat with BVI Yacht Charters on a Ben 36 "Tech Stocks. 2 cabins 1 head. Only problem was running out of propane while brewing coffee, just finished it on the BBQ and they had a bottle of propane delivered to Soppers Hole where we were staying and it was installed within a hour. The money we saved from using BVI was spent at Pussers, Willie T and other such establishments. Lots of pain killers and BBQ bugs with butter. We used 200 gallons of water and 6 gallons of fuel. The boat was older than 5 yrs but I have a 81 Cal 9.2 and a 79 Santana525. No boat problems experienced. Just the right size. I'l use the same folks, they were great!
Attached Thumbnails
Another First Time BVI Charter-ts36.jpg  
__________________
Cal 9.2 #19 SilverSwan
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #14  
Old 09-03-2009
drgamble's Avatar
Tartan 28
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: MdR, CA
Posts: 103
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
drgamble is on a distinguished road
Another suggestion - I've found some of the best charter deals can be had at the boat shows. I was able to get a very good deal with Sunsail at the Annapolis Boat Show last year. We did the BVI's for a week on a 39i mono. Did have some issues with the boat but they responded very quickly all things considered (long story) and issued us a credit to use going forward. One caveat - we did provision ourselves but still had a ton of leftover food. We found it very enjoyable to eat on land and mingle. We spent plenty of time sailing and diving on the boat that we enjoyed spreading out and exploring a bit more on land when time permitted - especially on a mono with 4 people.
__________________
-drgamble

Tartan 28
Peregrine

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #15  
Old 09-03-2009
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Calgary Alberta
Posts: 212
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 15
magnusmurphy is on a distinguished road
Charterers' anchoring show

I don't want to hijack the thread, but have a little story to tell that I think is quite funny. Maybe I can bring a few wry smiles to a few people...

During the 2008 cruising season, my family and I sailed our cruising boat from Florida to Grenada, through the "thorny path". On arrival in the BVI from Culebra, we checked in at Jost Van Dyke and promptly went to Foxy's for a drink. Later that afternoon we were sitting on deck and watching the charter boats coming in in droves and at top speed, raching each other and jostling for a spot to anchor.

Now, I'm not a sailing snob, but everyone knows that there are all sorts of different experience levels when it comes to charterers. Many charterers have a lot of experience and own boats. Many others are there for the first time however. Nowhere does inexperience show quicker, than with anchoring skills. The most telling sign is the boat that drops anchor very quickly after arriving; no cruising through the already anchored boats to check out the lay of the land, the direction of the rodes, asking the other cruisers about their scope, not checking whether those have rope rode or all chain and not checking swinging room or the swing characteristics of the other boats (for instance will they sail at anchor).

The first incident was when a charterer dropped anchor and promptly and proudly reversed at a fast clip across the bow of a 65ft beautiful German flagged cruise boat that was lying to its anchor in 20 knts of breeze. The German skipper ran to the bow to fend off. Fortunately we could not hear the accompanying words... The charter boat barely missed the German boat when they finally realized this will not work and tried to cross back to their anchor, now being blown sideways towards the German.

During this escapade my wife noticed my youngest teenage daughter coming on deck with a bag of freshly popped popcorn and a deckchair. Her questioning look ellicited this reaction: "This is better than the movies!!"

Fortunately no-one crossed our bow that night. We were crashed into by a charter boat dragging anchor in Marin, Martinique though, but that's another story and not quite as funny...

Maybe a fun thread about anchoring woes would be entertaining - and educational at the same time. We all have to learn... better to read about a mistake someone else already make, than learning by making it yourself..

M Murphy
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #16  
Old 09-03-2009
drgamble's Avatar
Tartan 28
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: MdR, CA
Posts: 103
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
drgamble is on a distinguished road
Thanks Murphy - that story is exactly why we were on a strict mooring ball diet for our first time around in the BVI's, absent dropping hook at some stopover locales (e.g. Sandy Cay)... We received some of the same entertainment though over at the anchorage/mooring field at Trellis in BVI. There is a very shallow area that jets out on the way into the dinghy dock and we had one of the nearest moorings to it. My dive boat that had picked me up earlier that day warned me about it stating that it was so shallow that even a dinghy would get hung up. Sure enough, that afternoon/evening as everyone was quick to come to shore for the dinner and Full Moon party festivities people unkowingly would "shortcut" through this area to the dinghy dock only to hear their dink's outboard "wack" against the bottom, pop up on it's pivot and stall - all passengers looking fearful for life. The first few times we tried to yell and wave off those headed for their beached fate to no avail (they just couldn't hear us/see us and weren't paying attention). To that end we simply would sip cocktails and await someone to say - "here comes another one"... Free entertainment.
__________________
-drgamble

Tartan 28
Peregrine

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #17  
Old 09-03-2009
Chuteman's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: SF Bay Area, CA
Posts: 221
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
Chuteman is on a distinguished road
Malyea:
Under the title "cake & eat it too".....if you are a little flexible with your dates and do a little research - you could save some $$$ and/or get a better/newer boat.
Request brochures & pricing sheets from Moorings (appears to be your 1st choice now) and a couple of others, Sunsail + agree Horizon is a good choice especially for your 1st time = you won't get lost in the crowd at the Moorings/Sunsail/Footloose complex....more personalized service.

Also sign up for e-mail news - then you will receive advance notice on sales, deals, etc. Check their sites regularly too - and look under deals, specials, etc. You might just find one that works for You.......and you will stretch those $$$ into more painkillers or a lobster dinner.
Enjoy
P.S. Also agree that Travel Talk on-line BVI section will be a good source for all sorts of info for you & crew. .......Don't forget to study the Cruising guide before you leave home.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #18  
Old 09-04-2009
s/v 'Bout Time
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 177
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 6
malyea is on a distinguished road
Update on my selection progress:

Based on positive comments I've added Voyage YC and Pro Valor to the list.

I haven't yet read any comments about CSY or TMM. Anybody?

I 'm about to email all 10 companies my resume, stating that I'd like a 35' to 40' mono, sailing shorthanded with girlfriend and want to spend 36 to 48 hours at Anegada as one of the stops.

My worst fear is lost time due to boat malfunctions. I'm OK without much handholding from the company but I'd like the boat to work - everyday. If it breaks, I'd like maintenance support ASAP. Saving money is high on my list but not at the risk of being stuck on the hook when the breeze is fresh and Anegada beckons.

I plan to self provision with Bobby's market and go easy on the initial list - we'll stop and replenish as needed.

ADDITIONAL REQUEST: Top 10 - 20 tips on how to NOT LOOK LIKE A FIRST TIMER IN THE BVI

Great info so far. Thanks to all!

Last edited by malyea; 09-04-2009 at 12:13 PM.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #19  
Old 09-04-2009
RealityCheck's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Tortola BVI
Posts: 247
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
RealityCheck is on a distinguished road
ADDITIONAL REQUEST: Top 10 - 20 tips on how to NOT LOOK LIKE A FIRST TIMER IN THE BVI

Great info so far. Thanks to all!

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Best way to appear not to be a first time bare-boat charter is practice mooring and anchoring with the most physical person doing the hard work... generally the guy up forward while the lady is at the helm.

Most 1st timers have the guy at the helm screaming at the little lady who is fighting with the mooring ball or anchor lines. The more physical person can handle this best and the increased physical strength can over ride some inexperience. Almost anyone can handle the helm. Just find an area where few are moored/ anchored and make a few practice runs.
__________________
I prefer a sailboat to a motorboat, and it is my belief that boat sailing is a finer, more difficult, and sturdier art than running a motor.... Jack London
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #20  
Old 09-04-2009
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Calgary Alberta
Posts: 212
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 15
magnusmurphy is on a distinguished road
Most important in my opinion;

mooring: Approach dead into wind (right on the nose) very slowly.
Anchoring: Take your time. Drive through the anchorage. Check out the other boats. Look at their rodes, ask about scope. Have an idea whether your boat sails at anchor (tip - all charter boats do - they're light and have high freeboard). Drop your anchor "behind" the stern of the boats next to you or they might swing over your anchor and you can't get out the next day... Make sure you're far enough so that the difference in swing characteristics and scope will not bring you too close. Do not drop too close in front of someone or you'll not be able to let out enough scope. It is ok to go very close to the boat in front to drop (as long as you're behind the boat AND its dinghy) - then fall back. One thing though, if the wind pipes up and that boat lets out more scope he might end up over your anchor and you're trapped again.

Don't reverse your engine on the anchor right away - it might pull out; let it settle a bit. let your engine cool down in idle while you make tea. Take bearings and look around. Then put boat in reverse in idle and feel chain for dragging. I assume you lay it out nicely as you dropped back in the beginning - not having dropped everything in a pile... The best way to drop back is to simply have the wind swing the bow around and then back. This way you'll find out quickly if you're too close to another boat. The rode will bring you head to wind again when you stop laying out scope.

Then if at ALL possible: DIVE the anchor.

DON't leave the boat for a while - rule of thumb; at least 30 min but it depends on conditions- while continuing to check that you're settled and don't move or come too close to others.

Check if others previously there have concerns that you're too close. If they have - you should move.

And PLEASE: if there's a wide open bay and one or two boats anchored on one side - don't snuggle up to them - anchor somewhere else. If you want company, dinghy over, don't crowd them.

M Murphy

Last edited by magnusmurphy; 09-04-2009 at 03:00 PM.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Bareboat charter companies in the BVI astraeus Chartering 30 02-26-2010 06:58 PM
Understanding Time for Navigation Jim Sexton Seamanship Articles 0 10-14-2004 09:00 PM
BVI charter report magnusmurphy Chartering 15 05-29-2004 08:56 PM
BVI trip report 8-18 Jul 03 (long) DuaneIsing Chartering 5 08-06-2003 07:15 AM
Running Fixes Jim Sexton Seamanship Articles 0 06-03-2003 09:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:36 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.