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Go Back   SailNet Community > Out There > Destinations > Chesapeake / Central US east coast > Chesapeake Bay
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  #31  
Old 02-26-2013
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Re: Ready To Go Back In?

Quote:
Originally Posted by TakeFive View Post
Last year was remarkably debris-free. 2011 was pretty bad, starting with the April 17 noreaster that approached record high tide (washing years of debris off the river banks), and then Irene made it impossible to get out/in of the slip during ebb (huge wall of debris blocking me in).

I've thought about getting some people together, but the vast majority of sailboats in our marina are direlicts, or dreamy-eyed new owners who splash in May and never make it down the marina the rest of the year. There are 1-2 other actively used sailboats, so maybe this year we can do something. The local diver lives on a sailboat in our marina. He requires anchoring out in the harbor because the marina does not allow divers around the docks (death by electrocution and/or swept away in the current).
Do you mean to say there is stray current in the water. That's a major issue for boats. We are testing for it this week at our club as the boats go back in. Two different test. The pedestals and outlets and shore power cords is one. Second test is in the water of the boats bonding and ground to make sure they rent putting current in the water.
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  #32  
Old 02-26-2013
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Re: Ready To Go Back In?

I never come out in the winter.

Beware of temperature limits for paints and adhesive during the spring rush-to-launch. It may seem warm to you, but paints don't get used to the weather. I've had too many bad experiences while trying to rush the weather; I've learned.

Most bottom paints are 50F minimum and require longer drying with cool nights. Hard to get the extra coats. Topside paints are far less forgiving.
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  #33  
Old 02-26-2013
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Re: Ready To Go Back In?

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Originally Posted by TakeFive View Post
He requires anchoring out in the harbor because the marina does not allow divers around the docks (death by electrocution and/or swept away in the current).
There is no documented risk of diver electrocution swimming saltwater (using a power sander in a dingy, yes), but they are welcome to make their own policies.

From Ocean Navigator:

Capt. David Rifkin of Quality Marine Services in Jacksonville, Fla., (qualitymarineservices.net), co-authored, with James Shafer, a 2008 report for the Coast Guard and the American Boat and Yacht Council titled “In-Water Shock Hazard Mitigation Strategies.” According to Rifkin, the danger of electric shock is much greater in fresh water because the human body provides a more convenient electrical path than in salt water. Rifkin wrote in an e-mail. “In freshwater the human body is a much better conductor of electricity and therefore competes very well for current flow. In salt water, the water is far more conductive than the body (skin resistances wet are in the 1,000-Ohm range) so the body doesn’t see much of the current in the water. More of the current takes the lesser resistive path of the water in getting back to its source.”

Rifkin notes, “it takes about 2v/ft to cause paralysis and drowning. It would take a tremendous amount of current to get up to a gradient that high in salt water.” The reason this is unlikely is that by the time that powerful an electrical field built up, the circuit breaker on shore would likely have tripped, cutting off current to the faulty circuit supplying the stray current. As Rifkin further notes, “in a salt water situation, the greater danger is fire from local heating at the point of the electrical fault.”

Rifkin maintains a database of stray current accidents and he notes, “We don’t have a single instance of a fatality in salt water environments. Sure, people get shocked in salt water, but it usually involves actually touching a ‘hot’ fitting while in the water.”
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  #34  
Old 02-26-2013
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Re: Ready To Go Back In?

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Originally Posted by pdqaltair View Post
There is no documented risk of diver electrocution swimming saltwater (using a power sander in a dingy, yes), but they are welcome to make their own policies.
I think I made it pretty clear that I keep by boat in fresh water.

I have no data to indicate that there are stray currents in my marina. I also don't know the reason for the marina's policy. But there is a strong tidal current, and always a possibility of a frayed cord dipping in the water. So I think it's wise for any diver to do so away from the docks.
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  #35  
Old 02-26-2013
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Re: Ready To Go Back In?

Zanhiser's doesn't allow diving the bottom at the dock either. Not for safety or electric current issues, it is my understanding that it has to do with their certification as a "clean" marina. I grab a mooring and clean the bottom when needed. I find it has benefits over diving at the dock, i.e no fishing lines to tangle or pilings to bump. Takes me and the kid about 45-60 minutes to clean and change the zinc.
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  #36  
Old 02-26-2013
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Re: Ready To Go Back In?

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Originally Posted by chef2sail View Post
Yeah the Ultima 60 is worth it. Than T37chef for the tip. We do have a diver go down in April , June and Sept. since we get together with the other members of our club as a group and have it done it never exceeds $50 sometimes is &25. Diver is a good way to keep youaint fresh. Also use the petit spray on your prop.
I guess I'll find out when I look it up but are there different sprays to choose from under Petit? I have a Flex-o-Fold prop that appears to have never had anything on it.
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  #37  
Old 02-26-2013
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Re: Ready To Go Back In?

Swamp,

I believe Dave's referring to Pettit Zinc Coat Barnacle Barrier. I've used it for the past several seasons. It's definitely better than nothing and by some accounts is nearly as good as the alternative that costs 10x as much. It sticks well to the bronze prop and lets the barnacles slough off under power. Unfortunately I haven't had luck getting anything other than barnacles to stick to the stainless shaft and strut!
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  #38  
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Re: Ready To Go Back In?

Heres the stuff. I use about 1/2 can. make sure they do the shaft too

Pettit Products - Zinc Barnacle Barrier

PETTIT PAINTS Zinc Coat Barnacle Barrier at West Marine
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  #39  
Old 03-08-2013
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Re: Ready To Go Back In?

FYI, after deliberating on Pettit Vivid vs. SR40 or SR60, I've decided to stick with Vivid this year. It has worked well for me in fresh water, and the last few years' reviews in Practical Sailor lead me to believe that it should be fine for a few weeks in salt water. In fact, in P-S's tests in Florida saltwater, Vivid rated higher than SR40 (SR60 wasn't tested in the reviews I saw).

Here's another decision: I think I'm going to give their Vivid WHITE bottom paint a try. I've read a lot of reviews on other message boats, and apparently any slime color wipes off easily. It will be pretty cool having a boat whose bottom looks unpainted (from a distance). If I don't like it, I'll have a nice contrast coat if/when I go back to blue paint.

I called Pettit and they said that this will go over my current Vivid blue with no bleed-through, and should fully hide in two coats.
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Old 03-08-2013
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Re: Ready To Go Back In?

Quote:
Originally Posted by TakeFive View Post
FYI, after deliberating on Pettit Vivid vs. SR40 or SR60, I've decided to stick with Vivid this year. It has worked well for me in fresh water, and the last few years' reviews in Practical Sailor lead me to believe that it should be fine for a few weeks in salt water. In fact, in P-S's tests in Florida saltwater, Vivid rated higher than SR40 (SR60 wasn't tested in the reviews I saw).

Here's another decision: I think I'm going to give their Vivid WHITE bottom paint a try. I've read a lot of reviews on other message boats, and apparently any slime color wipes off easily. It will be pretty cool having a boat whose bottom looks unpainted (from a distance). If I don't like it, I'll have a nice contrast coat if/when I go back to blue paint.

I called Pettit and they said that this will go over my current Vivid blue with no bleed-through, and should fully hide in two coats.
Probably best to go woith what works best in your area and your type of sailing as well as dock conditions.

The Ultima 40/60 I know is an ablative.

Isnt the Vivid a hard coat paint. Expensive paint for a one season paint isnt it?

Which issue are you looking at March 2012?
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