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-   -   Bottom paint in N. Chesapeake (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/chesapeake-central-us-east-coast/72720-bottom-paint-n-chesapeake.html)

Tazsprout 03-11-2011 06:06 AM

Bottom paint in N. Chesapeake
 
I wondered if you Chesapeake sailers could weigh in on this one. I have a very small sail boat that I bought last year. It is 20+ years old. The boat was living in the Delaware River at the time it was purchased.

It has not one bit of bottom paint. I am guessing prior to its life in the Delaware it was someone's trailer sailer. I sail in the Bohemia River, mostly, and given the size of the boat, I'd be surprised if I ever make it past Turkey Point. The boat is in a slip 6 months of the year.

Does this boat need bottom paint? Do all in the water boats need bottom paint? I grew up sailing in the Great South Bay, and of course bottom paint was not optional.

Thanks!
Chris

PalmettoSailor 03-11-2011 05:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tazsprout (Post 707724)
I wondered if you Chesapeake sailers could weigh in on this one. I have a very small sail boat that I bought last year. It is 20+ years old. The boat was living in the Delaware River at the time it was purchased.

It has not one bit of bottom paint. I am guessing prior to its life in the Delaware it was someone's trailer sailer. I sail in the Bohemia River, mostly, and given the size of the boat, I'd be surprised if I ever make it past Turkey Point. The boat is in a slip 6 months of the year.

Does this boat need bottom paint? Do all in the water boats need bottom paint? I grew up sailing in the Great South Bay, and of course bottom paint was not optional.

Thanks!
Chris


If the boats going to be in the water 1/2 the year then yes you need bottom paint.

I've been using Pettit Hydrocoat and think it would be perfect for you since its waterbased making it less expensive and its easy to apply and clean up after. Its multi-season even after hauling out so you'd only have to paint every couple of years. I think it does loose some effectiveness after a haul out but I've never had any hard growth on the bottom. I usually have the bottom de-slimed by a diver once a season.

This on the Chesapeake 5 years at the Rappahannock and one a Herrington.

chef2sail 03-11-2011 06:48 PM

Yes you need the paint. I would go for an ablative. We have used Micron Extra for 6 years and actually have great results with it. First year great...secoind year good, but we have noticed it does not slough off the slime as well as it should,


I am thinking of switching over to Petit Ultima SR on recommendations of T37chef. The research I have done is that the self polishing of the ultima occurs at a slower speed than the micron extra and I shoulhave less problems with slime. ( I beleive West Marine uses this as a knockoff on one of their lines also somewhat cheaper.)

Check out Practical Sailor Tests for ratings at 6, 12, 18 months and 2 years.

Micros Exrtra/ Petit Ultima SR cant go worng here.

Dave

RichH 03-11-2011 07:18 PM

I keep a boat at Worton Creek, just south of the Sassafrass R. and Still Pond.

I would strongly advise the use of an ablative bottom paint, especially vs. the huge amount of barnacles that will attach if you dont.

The prevailing winds over the Chesapeake have changed in the past few years, changed to westerly from the normal southwesterly and the west winds dont 'turn over' the bay sufficiently .... and on the Northern Cheasapeake we now have a humongous slime and barnacle problem. I recently changed to Micron-extra since the Micron CSC doesnt do a good enough job of slime prevention ... with enhanced slime the barnacles have a much better chance to adhere to even ablative type paint. The Micron-extra retards the slime ... hence few barnacles.

ekenna 03-11-2011 07:55 PM

deinfitely need bottom paint
 
I am also on the bohemia and my boat is covered with barnacle worse this year than last. I suspect that was because it was on the hard for a repair to the rudder and I think the pressure wash they did washed the abalive paint off. It was spotless in july when it was pulled on the sling.

Tazsprout 03-12-2011 05:12 AM

Thanks, guys, this is what I thought (feared). Is there some reason why this is more expensive than reapplying? The quote I got was 450 and the boat is only 17 feet. I was thinking it was going to be $20/foot or something.

Any advice? And how does the yard figure out where the water line is going to BE?

Chris

pdqaltair 03-12-2011 09:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tazsprout (Post 708042)
Thanks, guys, this is what I thought (feared). Is there some reason why this is more expensive than reapplying? The quote I got was 450 and the boat is only 17 feet. I was thinking it was going to be $20/foot or something.

Any advice? And how does the yard figure out where the water line is going to BE?

Chris

Yes. Do-it-yourself. It's not difficult at all; for a boat your size, a few hours start to finish (2 coats, so this is spread over 2 days).

If you use an ablative paint and run it 2 years, you will not have to sand (other than a few loose spots), only recoat.

Minnewaska 03-12-2011 10:00 AM

$450, particularly if that includes the paint, hauling and launching, does not sound unreasonable.

If you can get it out of the water onto a trailer or such, you could do it yourself. However, it is messy, a tad miserable and the weather may not allow it to be done on the day you have available. That's why people make a living doing it.

chef2sail 03-12-2011 10:30 AM

Minne is correct here, The cheapest place I have found to haul powerwash is $8 per foot or $285. Good paint is at least $175 per gallon. For my boat 35 ft boat that equates to 2.5 gallons which is 2 coats as well as some extra on the leading edge of the keel and rudder which is $525. This is an every other year expense. The power wash take of all my old ablative so not much prep is needed, however it has to be done in an enviro firendly pit. I also put a special paint on my prop and drive shaft. My expense without that is $700 for a 35 ft boat

One thing to do is have a diver go under it or quick haul and wash it in the middle of the season. The diver may become a thing of the past soon with the environmental concerns.

Your price seems quite reasonable

Dave

RichH 03-12-2011 10:58 AM

Applying ablative is quite easy and economical. A 17ft. boat should only require 2 quart maximum of a good ablative like Micron-extra. Consider that the yard charges $70-90 / hour to apply this ... and then usually 'slops' it on with a coarse roller resulting in a rough surface that enhances 'slime growth' and retards the 'release' when the boat is 'moving'.

If you apply the ablative with care, using a short-knapped 1/4" foam roller and get the ablative as-smooth-as-you-can ... it will 'release' the growth easier and will last much much longer (due to the reduced total surface area of the smooth surface).

An alternative for the low salinity / brackish Bohemia would be to coat the bottom with a Copper/PTFE (such as VC-17) and then simply use a 'squeegee' on a long pole once every 2 weeks to 'knock off' the growth ... if the slime growth is constantly removed it will minimize barnacle attachment. VC17 will last for MANY seasons in fresh or slightly saline conditions. The only problem with VC17 or Baltoplate, etc. or any PTFE based bottom paint is that it can not be applied over anyother bottom paint ... just over bare gelcoat, or barrier coat; plus you cant apply anyother paint on top of it.
Especially if this boat has a trailer and you do get humongous growth, just 'short haul' with the trailer and then occasionally power wash or scrub the bottom - VC17 can safely be power-washed (at reduced power) as its considered a 'hard' bottom paint.
If you select VC17, you may want to consider mixing a simple 'antibiotic' to the VC17 such as oxytetracycline (a veterinary anti-biotic) about 12-18 'pills' smashed and ground into a very very very fine powder and then mixed into the VC-17 before applying will take care of the slime for a long time; less slime = less barnacles.

;-)


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