SailNet Community

SailNet Community (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/)
-   Chesapeake / Central US east coast (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/chesapeake-central-us-east-coast/)
-   -   Tom's Cove (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/chesapeake-central-us-east-coast/86486-toms-cove.html)

willyd 04-20-2012 08:01 PM

Tom's Cove
 
Has anyone anchored in Tom's Cove at the south end of Assateague recently? How is it getting in there?

- Will

travlineasy 04-21-2012 04:01 PM

Re: Tom's Cove
 
Toms Cove is always a questionable location, simply because the sand bars constantly shift along with the channels. The inlet is pretty much a piece of cake during slack tide, and if you are fortunate enough to find the cut through the sandbar just inside the inlet, you will find depths to 8 feet behind the tip of the island. Commercial watermen used to mark the cut with stakes driven into the mud, but the last time I was there, which was about three years ago, the stakes were gone and the old cut was filled in to a depth of just 4 feet.

Good Luck,

Gary :cool:

pdqaltair 04-21-2012 05:07 PM

Re: Tom's Cove
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by travlineasy (Post 861554)
Toms Cove is always a questionable location, simply because the sand bars constantly shift along with the channels. The inlet is pretty much a piece of cake during slack tide, and if you are fortunate enough to find the cut through the sandbar just inside the inlet, you will find depths to 8 feet behind the tip of the island. Commercial watermen used to mark the cut with stakes driven into the mud, but the last time I was there, which was about three years ago, the stakes were gone and the old cut was filled in to a depth of just 4 feet.

Good Luck,

Gary :cool:

Exactly. I poked around in there once some years ago. Everything in the area moves around. The main channel is well marked, but out side of that, you're on your own.

I never really tried to anchor there, as I was always going in town, but if you are only stopping for the night it would save a lot of time.

Also remember there is a lot of tide; though there are no waves in that area, if you ground at high tide you could be there a while. At low tide, not so long.

travlineasy 04-21-2012 11:25 PM

Re: Tom's Cove
 
Under the right conditions, the tidal change there can be as much as 8 feet. Same holds true with several other inlets farther south. I never understood why, for example, at Cape Charles Harbor the tidal change was less than 3 feet, while just across the peninsula not three miles away at Oyster, the tidal change could be as much as 12 feet. Just another unexplained phenomena of nature that drives us crazy. ;)

If you're headed south from Ocean City, and wanted a sheltered area to spend the night, the hook just before entering Toms Cove has about 20 feet of water relatively close to shore. It's sheltered fairly well from an easterly and northerly wind. For me, I would prefer easterly, mainly because the national bird of Chincoteague is the mosquito. They can really be bad when the wind's blowing from the southwest or any westerly direction.

Good Luck,

Gary :cool:

willyd 04-24-2012 07:33 AM

Re: Tom's Cove
 
Thanks for all the input. I'm planning to sail for a few weeks next month, and I've always thought that would be a neat destination.

pdqaltair 04-24-2012 07:53 AM

Re: Tom's Cove
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by willyd (Post 862540)
Thanks for all the input. I'm planning to sail for a few weeks next month, and I've always thought that would be a neat destination.

If were not going to tie-up in town, I think Travelineasy's suggestion makes sense. It could be much more stright forward than trying to thread the needle.

If you're gunkholing the cost, perhaps there is some stuff on my blog you'ld enjoy, starting here:
Sail Delmarva: Trip Report - 2010 Delmarva Circumnavigation
Sail Delmarva: Trip Report - 2009 Delmarva Circumnavigation.

I don't know your draft, but Watchapreague is a good stop.

travlineasy 04-24-2012 10:56 AM

Re: Tom's Cove
 
Wachapreague is a neat place, and many years ago it had a great restaurant. I haven't been there is a while, but from what I recall about the inlet, there was two entrances, the deepest of which was a cut along the shore that connected with the main inlet. The main inlet entrance, which is well marked, was nothing more than a slot through the surf. I was real hairy when the tide was ripping out and there was an easterly wind.

Sand Shoal Inlet is an easy passage, lots of deep water inside the inlet that is well protected and provides great anchorages. Excellent flounder fishing just inside the inlet and along the channel edges.

The only other inlet that's sailboat navigable is Great Machapongo Inlet, which is situated between Wachapreague and Sand Shoal inlets. The inlet is deep, with the exception of the seaward end where it shoals up to just 8 feet. Once into the inlet you'll find depths to 50 feet and a ripping current during during tidal changes.Consequently, this is one of those places where you can only access the back bay anchorage areas during slack tide. The only town here is Willis Wharf, which is a small fishing village.

Good Luck,

Gary :cool:


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:53 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012