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-   -   Chesapeake trip in May (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/crew-wanted-available/72656-chesapeake-trip-may.html)

willyd 03-08-2011 02:49 PM

Chesapeake trip in May
 
Iím thinking of making a 2-3 week cruise down the Chesapeake and up the James river this May in my Pacific Seacraft 25. Sheís minimally equipped: tiller steering, porta potty, compass & charts, hank-on foresails. Interested persons should bring their own gear and are responsible for their transportation to and from the boat.

Interested crew should:
- know how to read a nautical chart and
- steer in a straight line (toward the desired point)
- be able to stand night watches
- know how to use the two-way radio
- be willing to do sail changes in all conditions
- cook well
- possess RSA certificate or equivalent
- be physically fit, mentally awake, morally straight, etc.
- be ready to jump overboard and push the boat off of sandbars should we run aground
- not pee on the anchor or rudder
- not throw up on either of the above or in the cabin
- not run with scissors
- or play with matches
- not get seasick
- not get sunburned
- like biting insects
- warn the captain if the boom is about to hit him in the head
- be ready to light the captainís pipe when it goes out
- wake up the captain should he fall asleep during his watch
- not hang laundry from the lifelines
- be able to repair complicated electronics, including radar, even though there are none on board
- have a knowledge of local Indian languages (e.g., Powhatan)
- not have voted for anyone before Eisenhower
- play a musical instrument
- be mindful of proper idiom and register when speaking with the captain
- write good poetry and be ready to recite a daily poem about how enjoyably the trip is going

I will provide all the food (pop-tarts & non-alcoholic beer, or ramen & gatorade, alternately, with dollar store fig bars for dessert) unless you bring your own and it doesnít require cooking or leave grease marks on the chart table.

chef2sail 03-08-2011 07:49 PM

What about snoring????????

willyd 03-08-2011 10:22 PM

Snoring is okay if it's used constructively, e.g., to wake the captain during his watch. Otherwise, no.

I see that I was unclear on at least one point: "like biting insects" should read "like insects that bite."

T37Chef 03-09-2011 09:00 AM

The food offered is so enticing I almost cant resist ;-)

BubbleheadMd 03-09-2011 09:30 AM

Willy,

Are you really making this trip or is the post just a goof-off?

willyd 03-09-2011 03:37 PM

No and yes.
 
I'm really planning on making this trip, but I was kidding about the non-alcoholic beer part. And maybe the pipe thing, too.

Oh, and no nudists or dogs.

CalebD 03-09-2011 05:23 PM

'like biting insects' - make mine a Praying Mantis, at least it could bite back!

Willy,
BubbleHead is in your immediate vicinity and sounds potentially interested. He's so close he could probably arrange to meet you for a beer/coffee in Annapolis or nearby. It is a good idea to know what kind of people one would be signing on with prior to a trip of your proposed duration.
In fact I'd guess it is going to be difficult to find crew that will be free for the entire length of your proposed trip.
Sounds like fun though.

What is wrong with "pissing on the rudder"?
And what about the 'menu'? Are you an omnivore, vegetarian or vegan?

willyd 03-10-2011 09:41 AM

He may be close, but he sounds kind of angry. Plus, I'd rather go for a short sail beforehand than have coffee or beer. It's cheaper, and I've found a lot of people (e.g., ones who've only taken ASA courses) can't steer worth a darn. And the crew should want to check the boat for holes and see what kind of a sailor I am. Perhaps I can't steer worth a darn, either.

I'm not sure why I'd pay someone to go sailing with them - any more than I'd pay someone to go on a hiking or bicycle trip together. If I find crew that can't do the whole trip, then one leg is fine. The only problem with doing that on the Chesapeake is that, especially once you cross the mouth of the Potomac, the distances by car to get back home for most people increase by 100 miles. One alternative would be to put crew ashore with an axe, some matches, and package of fig bars, but they probably wouldn't be there to pick up on the way back.

steel 03-10-2011 06:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by willyd (Post 707326)
Plus, I'd rather go for a short sail beforehand than have coffee or beer. It's cheaper, and I've found a lot of people (e.g., ones who've only taken ASA courses) can't steer worth a darn. And the crew should want to check the boat for holes and see what kind of a sailor I am. Perhaps I can't steer worth a darn, either.

How are poor people who were only able to take some ASA courses supposed to get more experience?

Since you're going to be staying in rivers, it shouldn't matter much if the boat has a few holes :)

willyd 03-12-2011 06:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by steel (Post 707543)
How are poor people who were only able to take some ASA courses supposed to get more experience?

Since you're going to be staying in rivers, it shouldn't matter much if the boat has a few holes :)

I see your point. Perhaps an incentive program could be worked out: 45 degrees off course, no fig bars, 90 degrees off course, no pop tarts, 180 degrees off course, no rations. Right on course, extra ration of non-alcoholic Old Milwaukee. http://destinationbeer.com/system/be...png?1273072636 Over time steering should improve.


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