British Columbia wilderness, sometime in next 3 years, any exp - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > Out There > Crew Wanted/Available
 Not a Member? 


Like Tree2Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 03-18-2013
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 16
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
limpyweta is on a distinguished road
British Columbia wilderness, sometime in next 3 years, any exp

There's about 19 remote forests throughout West Vancouver Island and East Queen Charlotte Strait I'd prefer to sail to, engineless, whenever safely practicable. If the boat's 30' or less, I will get the resources to go (if that means buying the boat and maintaining it), will spend at least 1500 more hours of such passage making practice aboard, and all other working time preparing for it, somewhere in Puget Sound, over the first year, then I'll try to go, if there are enough sailors or skippers and their boats interested in any of the trips.

I'll consider those of any sailing experience level if they'll make time. My schedule has a high priority to practice with them and assess each other's competencies. Sail crew may find something else to do during bush trots.

With money, a variety of deals may work out if I'm the skipper, and as a starting position, I'd be fine with one who can cover their own personal expenses, but don't expect to cover any of my boat, or living expenses.

Much more about all of this is on the 3/15/13 post of the blog poppdbubb. Thanks!

Last edited by limpyweta; 04-30-2013 at 07:26 PM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 03-19-2013
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 12
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
IMAnonymous is on a distinguished road
Re: British Columbia wilderness, sometime in next 3 years, any exp

What's the link to the other post?

There's an annual sailboat race around Vancouver Island and anybody with ten hours of sailing time can do it (And have a 50-50 chance of winning the race). People with 8 foot dinghies used to routinely row to Victoria when the Hudson Bay Company was there.

Also, there's a well paved highway that runs north all the way up Vancouver Island. Are you thinking it's a wilderness? If you can pull up the centerboard, you can beach almost anywhere you want (Except in somebodies backyard). A 12 foot 420 will get you anywhere you want to go. Athough the racers use 30 footers they're not beaching either. So you have me confused. When you say there are "19 remote forests" I think you're the under the impression you think you're sailing away from civilization instead of towards it - You and 25,000 other boats.

"Safely practical" is June to September though June is seldom dry but you can do April-May if you dress warm (and dry) but probably not much fun. Smooth water, light prevailing wind out of the west. Even crappy weather isn't dangerous. Plan for 5-6 knots speed. No danger (You could make the trip on a wind surfing board or a kayak). What are the 1500 hours for? To prepare to clear Customs? Because it might take that long. Or practice avoiding getting run over by tankers? And "bush trots?" Have you ever been there?

If you haven't, you can Google satellite photography.

Got a chart? Look up "Buccaneer Bay". Nice place and too shallow for the big boats.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 03-19-2013
jrd22's Avatar
Courtney the Dancer
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: San Juan Islands., WA, USA
Posts: 3,817
Thanks: 3
Thanked 15 Times in 15 Posts
Rep Power: 14
jrd22 will become famous soon enough
Re: British Columbia wilderness, sometime in next 3 years, any exp

Not sure where to start on this one.
I think when I hear someone talking about the west side of Van. Is. and saying anyone that has 10 hours total time sailing can do it in smooth water and in light westerly winds in a 12' boat I have to assume they are joking. Right? Please tell me that you were joking, please!
Cawarra Bill likes this.
__________________
John
SV Laurie Anne

1988 Brewer 40 Pilothouse

Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 03-19-2013
jackdale's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Calgary, AB, Canada
Posts: 8,860
Thanks: 26
Thanked 37 Times in 34 Posts
Rep Power: 6
jackdale will become famous soon enough
Re: British Columbia wilderness, sometime in next 3 years, any exp

The west side of Vancouver Island can get really poopy at times. I have waited out hurricane force winds, and turned back because of very strong winds and high seas. I have also had to motor in dead calms. I have been around 11 times and making the 12th trip at the end of May.

The Van Isle 360 is every two years and the crews on the those boats are highly experienced. This years entry list - 42 Entrants registered for the Van Isle 360 2013 I did the race in 2007 on a 40 foot X Yacht.

A friend tried to go round in a Taser and had to be rescued.
__________________
__________________
ISPA Yachtmaster Offshore Instructor Evaluator
Sail Canada Advanced Cruising Instructor
IYT Yachtmaster Coastal Instructor
ASA 201, 203, 204, 205, 206, 214
As I sail, I praise God, and care not. (Luke Foxe)
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 03-19-2013
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 16
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
limpyweta is on a distinguished road
Re: British Columbia wilderness, sometime in next 3 years, any exp

Quote:
Originally Posted by IMAnonymous View Post
What's the link to the other post?
Are you thinking it's a wilderness? What are the 1500 hours for? To prepare to clear Customs? Because it might take that long. Or practice avoiding getting run over by tankers? And "bush trots?" Have you ever been there?

Got a chart? Look up "Buccaneer Bay". Nice place and too shallow for the big boats.
Addressing the first question, that post may answer the latter 6. I hope with the way it was organized and phrased, it's not too much, but I could reword it or add something to help, depending on the other audiences that read it. 3rd question: I was thinking of a cruising keelboat sloop, 27'-30'. 4th question: I should think about customs. How may clearing them take that long?

I don't have charts yet, but thanks! I think the BC canoe sailors group sail there occasionally.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 03-19-2013
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 16
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
limpyweta is on a distinguished road
Re: British Columbia wilderness, sometime in next 3 years, any exp

Quote:
Originally Posted by jackdale View Post
The west side of Vancouver Island can get really poopy at times. I have waited out hurricane force winds, and turned back because of very strong winds and high seas. I have also had to motor in dead calms. I have been around 11 times and making the 12th trip at the end of May.

A friend tried to go round in a Taser and had to be rescued.
A big part of preparation is planning for things like this. I'd love to know more about what winds are probable, what winds are predictable, how they're predictable, what they do to waves in certain areas, and the timing of it all. In the calms, in case it won't be easy to get all the info needed elsewhere from the net, kayaking and cruising guides, charts, and various editions of "Sailing Directions", any local knowledge small boat sailors, paddlers, or divers know about the tidal currents, even if they're like a half knot or less, in the inlets and places like Clayoquot Sound, would be very much appreciated.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 03-19-2013
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: British Columbia
Posts: 2,349
Thanks: 19
Thanked 33 Times in 32 Posts
Rep Power: 3
Brent Swain is on a distinguished road
Re: British Columbia wilderness, sometime in next 3 years, any exp

I have been cruising the BC coast, mostly 11 months a year for most of the last 40 years. You can drag your dinghy up anywhere, including in someones back yard, except on the highest high tides. as private property here only extends to the high tide line. Anything below the maximum height of the driftwood is all public access.
West Vancouver Island is just too accessible for small powerboats via lots of roads down to the heads of inlets, to be real wilderness. For that you best go north of Cape Caution where the only access is by seaworthy boat.
I have windjammed without an engine of any kind for several years on this coast. Takes a long time to get anywhere, so you best have indefinite plans. Go up Johnston Strait in a good reliable wind. It can blow 40 knots there while it is a glassy calm in the back channels. Expect to spend weeks in extremely doubtful anchorages , waiting for wind
__________________
Brent Swain, Boat designer, Builder, and author of "Origami Metal Boatbuilding"
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 03-19-2013
jackdale's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Calgary, AB, Canada
Posts: 8,860
Thanks: 26
Thanked 37 Times in 34 Posts
Rep Power: 6
jackdale will become famous soon enough
Re: British Columbia wilderness, sometime in next 3 years, any exp

Quote:
Originally Posted by limpyweta View Post
A big part of preparation is planning for things like this. I'd love to know more about what winds are probable, what winds are predictable, how they're predictable, what they do to waves in certain areas, and the timing of it all. In the calms, in case it won't be easy to get all the info needed elsewhere from the net, kayaking and cruising guides, charts, and various editions of "Sailing Directions", any local knowledge small boat sailors, paddlers, or divers know about the tidal currents, even if they're like a half knot or less, in the inlets and places like Clayoquot Sound, would be very much appreciated.
Planning is essential. Some of the currents are downright nasty.

Start with the Canadian Hydrographic Service "Sailing Directions" British Columbia Coast (Southern Portion)

The appendices in the back show some wind direction and velocities as well as days with fog, etc..

There are a few blogs that discuss the trip as well.
__________________
__________________
ISPA Yachtmaster Offshore Instructor Evaluator
Sail Canada Advanced Cruising Instructor
IYT Yachtmaster Coastal Instructor
ASA 201, 203, 204, 205, 206, 214
As I sail, I praise God, and care not. (Luke Foxe)
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 03-19-2013
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 12
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
IMAnonymous is on a distinguished road
Re: British Columbia wilderness, sometime in next 3 years, any exp

Quote:
Originally Posted by limpyweta View Post
Addressing the first question, that post may answer the latter 6. I hope with the way it was organized and phrased, it's not too much, but I could reword it or add something to help, depending on the other audiences that read it. 3rd question: I was thinking of a cruising keelboat sloop, 27'-30'. 4th question: I should think about customs. How may clearing them take that long?

I don't have charts yet, but thanks! I think the BC canoe sailors group sail there occasionally.
The boat size is fine. I read your experience and you're only lacking in two areas. The predominate two factors to the area (as in any area) are current and wind. The current is not very noticable on flat water but actually pretty fast. Going against it can slow you down more than you're used to. Having a tidebook will help. What you will face that you haven't faced before are rapids. There are three of them and they're just like river rapids. What causes them is when the channel narrows (As with an island in the middle of it) and too much tidewater has to go through too small an area so the water accelerates to where it's going faster than your boat. If you're going with it, you're flying through, and if you're going against it, well, you could be going backwards. This is where you might miss not having a motor. Most everybody goes through on a slack or "ebb" tide. That's about a 15-20 minute window between when the tide reverses from going one way to the other. Your tidebook will tell you. I would really not recommend you go through them when its running. Another tide produced anomally you probably haven't faced are whirlpools/riptides. These can produce a sudden change in direction in your boat. They're unlikely to appear on your charts but they're in predictable locations and often talked/known about by those who frequent the area. They're not dangerous but unpredictable. Again, an ebb tide solves the problem.

You will absolutely have to have a chart as I know one of those channels has (or did have) a rock in it. The chart should show the word "rapids" or it's not a good chart. But anytime your chart shows a narrow space between two large bodies of water that's where the rapids are going to be. While waiting for the tide to ebb, try throwing out a line for a silver salmon. The fishing's better up there than down here and, with the tides, the salmon get funneled into the same narrows.

I mentioned wind. In some places it's always blowing year around (say 20-25 mph). Generally speaking, if you can see the Pacific, you've got wind as it comes in off the Pacific. If you can't, you might not. Expect to be becalmed at least once a week and perhaps for several days. If you have access to weather reports, be in a bay on those days. Also, try and be where you're going by sunset. The wind dies fast at sunset.

As for customs, that's a political thing. If the Canadians are disputing the US over the river runs or, if the US is slowing Canadians from crossing into the US, they could retaliate with hasseling you. Otherwise, it's the same as entering Canada with a car. It goes fast. What will slow you down is tying up and even figuring out where to tie up. It would be wise to have an idea where the Custom House is as you come in your first time (with no engine) and where you're supposed to tie up in case they want to come aboard. You'll also have to clear American Customs on your way back.

The poster that sails there 11 months out of the year? He's the sailor to contact. You're lucky to find him. You'll want to ask him where to go and when to be there and how long it takes, and you want to know about inland egress when you get there ("bush trotting"). Just because you can get into a distant bay doesn't mean you can get out of it on foot. And, if you can go inland, ask about mosquitoes and horseflies.

Outside of a few stretches its very safe sailing up there and you don't have to sail the west side of Vancouver Island, you can always sail the east side both ways.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #10  
Old 03-20-2013
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Naniamo B.C.
Posts: 1,770
Thanks: 2
Thanked 27 Times in 27 Posts
Rep Power: 3
Capt Len is on a distinguished road
Re: British Columbia wilderness, sometime in next 3 years, any exp

Leaving the boat anchored while you wander deep inland is asking for endless adventure.One problem that I've not found an answer for is 'How to get ashore with all the bears on the beach and even worse "how to get to the beached dinghy to return to mother ship And then there's cougars and north of God's Pocket a chance of Sasquatch. This is wild country, full of salmon farms, helicopter logging camps and highend tourist resorts. Also many commercial fishers and crawling with sport fishers. They all have engines now.Probably a good reason for that. Back in the day,before I was a kid ,folks did sail/row small dorys on the coast but most took a tow from the company packer. Getting up the Salish Sea to Surge Narrows is easy but going beyond asks for a bit of talent.If no engine think swampscot or Drascomb lugger, many seasons of learning curvs and longer anchor rodes than you've got.( Bee keepers hats are mandatory for sleeping with the bugs) Luck
Cawarra Bill likes this.

Last edited by Capt Len; 03-20-2013 at 02:28 AM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Hello, from beautiful British Columbia! Mystic1 Introduce Yourself 19 03-27-2014 09:43 PM
Information on the Wilderness 30'? By Wilderness Boat Works racepace Boat Review and Purchase Forum 8 10-27-2010 11:08 AM
R.C.M.P. boardings in British Columbia johnvye General Discussion (sailing related) 61 06-05-2009 06:47 PM
British Columbia bmcald Cruising & Liveaboard Forum 13 01-28-2003 03:09 PM
British Columbia to Mexico providence Cruising & Liveaboard Forum 0 01-28-2001 05:32 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:08 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.