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  #21  
Old 12-05-2006
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Cool Wow!

Quote:
Originally Posted by EscapadeCaliber40LRC
Here are the chronicles of a couple of younger whipper snappers that have pulled off a serious dash around the world. Looks like they've got a little less than one more puddle to cross...

http://www.bumfuzzle.com/Pages/Main%20Pages/Dates.html

Now there's a first mate! Wonder if she has any sisters?
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  #22  
Old 12-05-2006
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All,

We started (wife and I) doing pretty serious sailing around mid-20's. We got very comfortable with sailing on a 320, then had a kiddo, and put him on the boat at age 5 days. By 29 or 30, we were living aboard a Catalina 380 and cruising as much as possible. Now, 6 years later, we have a Caalina 400 and are about to embark out again, hopefully for a lot longer and further this time with the improvement in technology.

All that being said, let me tell you that your perception of the marinas being primarily an older generation is quite true. If you are under 50, I would say, you will be in the minority. (PS, the exception to the older generation is California, especially Southern, where there seems to me to be a lot younger croud. I wonder if others have seen this like we have? Are there other areas?). This might seem bad, and there is the obvious generation gap, but it really is not bad at all. The 50's and 60's year old we met were as cheerful and vibrant as anyone in their 20's and 30's. Age, race, sex, nationality... you will not find it a negatively defining characteristic. In fact, we often seek out other flags. The absolute funniest people we have ever met were Jamaicans and Australians, especially the Aussies! The most family oriented were probably Brazilians. Canadians were often the most open and friendliest and Americans often the quickest to help with problems. With a few exceptions, you will "click" really well with all of them. Many may want to keep your kids (if you have them), and you will find every weekend another boat party, in general. I would not say a boat party is a drinking party, big exception. We would get together and scream at each other over a friendly card game, or the proper way to grill fish, some politics (very little, suprisingly), and a lot of talk about neat places to cruise. You will become a close family and will not realize they are older. We did meet a young couple (mid 30s) that became our best friends in the world (and still are), but the younger generation, as it was put, is more far and inbetween. Family's cruising is even further from the norm.

Most of the people you will meet are very intelligent, educated, and were very successful in their pre-boating life. But when they hit the water and were on a boat, all those frustrations were left behind and you will see them for what they really are: Just great people. Funny, I am not sure I know what most of them did to earn a living?? We rarely talked about it. Bird identification and boat troubleshooting were more likely topics.

I will say that the reason the younger generation is absent is not a lack of adventure or being too tied down. Boating and cruising is very expensive, and not getting any cheaper. Most of the people are older because they are retired or spent much of their life doing very well and now have the money to go cruising. I think that is what stops younger generations. Many may ask how we did it (and are about to do it again) and I will tell you that we have been very bleesed with our careers and we also have fairly unique positions that allow us to work remotely anywhere with an internet connection.

All that being said, I agree with Cam and am in the minority: Save up and go versus just jumping out there on a wing and a prayer (financially speaking). Take your boating budget and double it. Ask PBeezer about how quickly things can go wrong and get expensive! Also, I have painted a Cruising World type picture of how "rosie" cruising and living aboard is... it is not like that all the time. Life is still life, whether from a boat, a house, or a camping trailer. In fact, I will say it is much easier from a house than a boat and the frustrations are considerably less. Want an example? Next time a really big storm rolls through, sail out to meet it. You will get stuck in one sooner or later. Try sitting down below in your boat for a weekend and hardly leaving it.... fronts come through and restrict your ability to do anything.

Tom Neale wrote a book called All in the Same Boat. It has been said that it has a lot of negative connotations... well, yes, maybe it does. However, it paints a much more realistic picture of what it is like in my experience. I would highly reccomend it. Having the right mindset and expectaions are better than getting surprised around the first marker.

It is not always fun. It is not always boat parties. The younger person(s) is more the exception than the rule. Still, it is worth it and you will find that the generation gap is not a big deal. Save your money. Read, read, read. Then make the pluge and find out for yourself. You will be glad you did.

- CD
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  #23  
Old 12-05-2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LWinters
... may be a big reflection on the differing viewpoints the younger generation has than the boomers.
The current young generations, be they called X, Y or whatever, haven't invented the early departure to pursue dreams. I would think that this urge has been followed by individuals from each generation throughout history. Call it wanderlust, adventure-seeking, an exploratory nature or simply restlessness, it has always sent the self-selected off into the world beyond their known circle.

At age thirty, I took a two-year sabbatical from the Navy to drive across Europe and Asia, primarily to climb virgin peaks in the Hindu Kush of Afghanistan. Then I bummed around the French and Italian Alps putting up some new routes, before returning to Canada to set-up and conduct leadership development programmes at an outdoor education school. These two years taught me much more about myself than had the preceding thirty.

I again put on my naval cap, but this time with a purpose clearly in mind. In 1981, at the age of thirty-six I resigned my commission and set up a small business that within ten years gave me a seven-digit bank account. I've been playing ever since.

It takes guts to pull the pin and leave the comfort of the known to set off in whatever vehicle, be it shoe leather or sailboat. I know, I only half pulled it the first time, and then went back to regroup for a few years. There is nothing wrong with a step backwards along the way, as long as the mind remains on the goal.

While there certainly is a predoninance of gray hairs in most marinas, I would think this has more to do with the resources required to "gain admission". Also, many of the young boat owners are off sailing, rather than hanging around.
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  #24  
Old 12-05-2006
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Nice writeup Dawndreamer.

I think this is on subject, but let me give a personal view point, to affirm what you have said: If you want to get ahead, it requires taking chances and learning to live UNDER YOUR MEANS! If I have one complaint about many of my countrymen, it is that. We have become a society of credit that lives from paycheck to paycheck. Learn to break that cycle, drive a old chevy if you can afford a Cadillac, and take some chances to be your own boss.

Just my thoughts and others may dissagree. And remember, it is NOT how much you make, it is HOW MUCH you have left over.

- CD
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  #25  
Old 12-05-2006
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Great posts on this thread.

CD, a question for you. You advocate an "save up and go" approach, but it doesn't seem like you saved up all you needed in your 20s before taking off. Have you had to stop and work again to build up funds (for larger boat, for kitty), and did you find that difficult?

Dawndreamer seems fully financed and ready to go, and apparently leveraged his experience traveling into confidence for a strong business venture (cool) during his working break.

Thanks!

Jim H
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  #26  
Old 12-05-2006
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Yes and no Jim. I will answer fully soon but am running around like crazy right now. Will either write back here or PM.

- CD
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  #27  
Old 12-05-2006
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Oh please

Well, If I can get these old asre fingers to type a couple of things.

1. There are and have been many youngbloods out there.

2. Stop looking for permission kid and be like Nike, just do it! So what if you are the first ( which you are by far not!!)
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  #28  
Old 12-05-2006
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Dawndreamer,

That line out of context is certainly a dangerous one. I nor any of the other young cruisers, or aspiring for that matter, think they are the first to pursue such a goal. This life seems to draw very literate folks and most I've met are well versed with those who went before including Slocum, Dumas, Knox-Johnston, Chichester, to the 100's of blogs one can find from small boat captains sailing today. Looking only at the sailing life also draws too small a picture. The boomers were "the" generation to redefine what life was all about. I've got no romantic notions about the 60's and 70's generation, but they certainly made it thier own more than any other that comes to mind.

In almost all persuits today I think we are standing on the sholders of giants. I'd just like to see more people my age pursue a life outside the norm earlier rather than later. I am not sure I believe that thier has to be a big bank account to "gain admission". With the number of aging, but solid fiberglass boats on the market there is a vessel that can fit the budget of any desire.

As a side note, on the desire to go adventuring John Anderson refers in a seminal book by the same title to what he calls the Ulysses Factor and says that it: «…is a complex of impulses in an individual prompting him to seek first hand physical experience of something hitherto unknown (to him) that has aroused his curiosity. It must include the impulse to learn firsthand through physical action: what, is immaterial; it may be to discover what lies beyond a range of hills, to see new stars by traveling to some new part of the earth’s surface to observe the heavens, to find the source of a river, to discover if there is a far side to an apparent limitless ocean. This is the main force - the physical satisfaction of man’s curiosity. »
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Last edited by LWinters; 12-05-2006 at 06:46 PM.
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  #29  
Old 12-05-2006
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I think the Pardey's started cruising at a young age. They also subscribe to the do it now theory!
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  #30  
Old 12-05-2006
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LWInters - that quote is a mistranslation but even grander in the original "Was immer Du tun kannst oder wovon Du träumst - fang damit an. Mut hat Genie, Kraft und Zauber in sich." The last sentence is a classic and the word "Action" should read "Bravery" - but in German it denotes "bravery to do something" so is a bit to translate without losing the Teutonic brevity of Goethe.
Somehow tumumltuous seas or skies always bring thoughts of Goethe, Heine, Nietzsche instead of the more staid French or English writers/thinkers. It is the German "Sturm & Drang" ethos at sea.
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