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Go Back   SailNet Community > Out There > Cruising & Liveaboard Forum
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  #21  
Old 08-16-2006
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Cruising Dad: I read your profile, you have a lot of offshore experience. I have singlehanded from Annapolis to England. That was an amazing trip. I also singlehanded from Newport-Bermuda and back to Annapolis. I have also done the Annapolis-Bermuda trip several times on different boats both in races and cruising. It's definitely one of my favorite crossings.
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  #22  
Old 08-16-2006
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http://www.kestrelboat.com/plan.html

Read this, especially the part about "Watch Duty" and I think you'll see.
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  #23  
Old 08-16-2006
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Wow

I have to get my act together! Reading all of this makes me realize just how unprepared I am for any serious cruising, let alone bluewater.

With that said... anyone need a crew hand out of Boston, MA?

This thread has been one of the better ones to date.

Thanks all you sea-dogs for your advice and links and lessons.

-M
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  #24  
Old 08-17-2006
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hellosailor has a spectacular aura about hellosailor has a spectacular aura about
"What's the big deal about off coast cruising?"
Well, if your brother was in the service he may be familiar with the phrase "It's the little things that kill you."
On a coastal cruise, you can often duck in if you need help or something runs out. Bluewater? You may have to hold your breath for seven to ten days.
Coastal, you can have one water tank. Bluewater? You'd better know that one tank can leak, or get salt water contamination in a storm, and have alternatives.
Weather? Can you forecast a week in advance and be sure of it? And can you handle the boat when the forecast was wrong? If one of you gets physically THROWN at sea (and even in 6-8 foot waves that's easy) and breaks something, can the other sail the boat solo till you make landfall?

Then there are more subtle things. Once you are out of sight of land, there's an optical illusion that you are in a "bowl", and some folks just freak out from it. The illusion, and the reality of no land.

If the rigging fails (all it takes is one bad cotter pin and you can lose the rig) can you jerry-rig it to continue? What if you lose the rudder? That happens too.

Blue-water requires either luck (which trumps all hands) or being prepared with a much longer "what-if" list and putting much more prep into the boat to prevent problems.

Even Tanya Abbae (sp?) had said that but for luck and the Gods, she would have never reached her first landfall (Bermuda, IIRC) and been lost at sea, because she was learning navigation AFTER she set off.

There's an old prayer about "the ocean is so big and my ship is so small"....that's what it comes down to.
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  #25  
Old 08-17-2006
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Most important don’t forget the rum and beer. I normally take 2 cases of beer with but it only lasts a few days.
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  #26  
Old 08-18-2006
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Hellosailor-

Also, just remember that the earliest sailors and navigators were learning when they did their first journeys, and the boats today and equipment are far better than what they had back then.

BTW, it is Tania Aebi....and rather easy to find via google or amazon.com.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Cruisingdad
SD,

I was smart enought to try and take the photos. Got some of them as they were swiming off the port side but it looks like crud. Sea was spraying all over the lens. I put it in my book anyway. My wife was also kind enough to to shoot a picture of me the next morning after that night. No, I will not share that one. Let's just say that I learned that EVERYONE GETS SEA SICK... we all just have different thresholds!!
LOL. you're killing me... I think I have a good idea of what the photo of you looks like... I've seen lots of people in that condition... Fortunately, my threshold is pretty damn high.
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Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #27  
Old 08-18-2006
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I really appreciate all the thoughtful replies. Some real time and effort went into your answers, and they are great. When you're not from a sailing family, or have much experience of your own, its easy to read the stories and guides and begin to think you need to be 10 feet tall in a 70ft boat with 50 years of experience to do lots of bluewater sailing – or you're a crazy fool. And it's discouraging. You being to make lists of things to learn, and time to practice, and stuff to buy, and it's easy to think you will never be ready. On the flip side some stories and people will tell you to just start sailing east in the first dinghy you can find, that you dont need anything. That everyone else are ninies. Of course most reasonable people will understand the truth is between those two poles. But then the devil is in the details. Do I need an autoinflating life raft if I have a dinghy? Competant sextant skills if I have a GPS? – on and on and on infinitem – and no experience to base those decisions on because you dont want to go too far in your boat without those answers.

This site, and threads like this, and most of all the people with the experience and comitment to spend the time to answer questions and participate, is awesome. Awesome in the most literal definition of the word, I am struck with awe.

To sum up, your guys rock, thanks.
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  #28  
Old 08-18-2006
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You should have Sextant skills as a backup to the GPS, especially if you're going on bluewater passages.

As for liferafts... not really a necessity, but YMMV... and some people think they're necessary, others not....
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Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
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  #29  
Old 08-19-2006
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That is DEAD wrong sailing dog. We've had this discussion before and GPS is WAY safer and more accurate than Sextant and while the skills are nice to have...Three - $100 GPS's in a pelican case with batteries is WAY safer than one GPS and sextant skills which can easily put you on a reef with their 2 mile accuracy if you're good! Not one out of 10 bluewater cruisers uses a sextant anymore and to suggest it is necessary is ridiculous in this day and age.
Going offshore without a liferaft is also insane if your boat doesn't have self flotation. What are you going to do if the boat gets knocked down and starts sinking...hope the dinghy will save you?
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  #30  
Old 08-19-2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by camaraderie
That is DEAD wrong sailing dog. We've had this discussion before and GPS is WAY safer and more accurate than Sextant and while the skills are nice to have...Three - $100 GPS's in a pelican case with batteries is WAY safer than one GPS and sextant skills which can easily put you on a reef with their 2 mile accuracy if you're good! Not one out of 10 bluewater cruisers uses a sextant anymore and to suggest it is necessary is ridiculous in this day and age.
Going offshore without a liferaft is also insane if your boat doesn't have self flotation. What are you going to do if the boat gets knocked down and starts sinking...hope the dinghy will save you?
Yes, you and I have decidedly different opinions on GPS... but that's fine...that is a personal preference in many ways.

My boat is a multihull and is very, very, very unlikely to sink. It has buoyancy compartments forward and aft in each of the hulls. For me, a liferaft really doesn't make sense. I've also worked a bit to make my boat much more resistant to sinking... floatation bags, foam filled areas, etc.
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Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
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Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
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