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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest Forums > Cruising & Liveaboard Forum
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  #21  
Old 09-29-2006
capbill
 
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Hi, you are never too old to start. I started 30 years ago with a 16' Comet, then 2 years later moved to a 22' Oday with a 1 yr son. My daughter, son & wife tried it over the years with my wife even in chartered 30s' boats in the Chesapeake but did not get in to it. The result was I sailed for 28 yrs just in the Barnegat Bay about day solo about 60% of the time. But I did bareboat about 13 weekends 30'-40' with guys from work in the Chesapeake & just dreamed about a BVI week. Last August, being alone I bought a 28' Oday with solo being most of the time. Since I am retired I solo maostly on week days. I think that I could have goene a couple of feet larger . I do have Sarah (Self-contained unit for Automatic Response at the Helm) to help on tacks & raising the main. I have a cradle in the slip to control the bow if there is wind for solo docking. I met a guy this year that soloed his 42' from Norfolk to Cape May. It is better to grow into a little bigger than comfortable boat than to quicky outgrow your existing one.
I am 65 but feel younger. A small number of guys in the marina are in their 70s & get alone with minimum help for day sails in 30' to 37'. I have not tried to weigh anchor in moderate wind solo yet.
My peers are dropping by the wayside. "Don't wait for your boat to come in, Swim out to it!"
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  #22  
Old 09-29-2006
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thanks capgillh - I've gotten so many goods words of encouragement! By the way, I have never heard of Sarah. Where can I learn more about it?
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  #23  
Old 09-30-2006
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sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
Nope.... even learning this late in life isn't a problem.
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Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #24  
Old 10-01-2006
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"Sarah" is my name for a Simrad Autopilot. It is surely female because you have to be careful to push her buttons the right way. Once I became a little disoriented & initiated a jibe. She slapped me back by breaking the topping lift that I had forgotten to loosen.
Once you have some experience with a 'smaller' boat then one could leverage that into chartering bigger boats in areas that would take you month(s) to reach in the smaller boat.
Enjoy!
Captain Bill, ret. from everyday work
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  #25  
Old 10-01-2006
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sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
LOL...sounds about right... a bit tempermental, and can be vicious if you piss her off...
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Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
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Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
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  #26  
Old 10-01-2006
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sailingdog: what type of boat do you call home? I'd really like to learn more about your sailing experiences, having noticed and appreciated your comments to many other posts.

here are a couple of more specific questions: some places I read that having a certain amount of nylon rode attached to your chain rode reduces the "shock load", yet elsewhere, I read that cruisers will want an all chain rode. What do you think, and why. Also: are there ways that a fin keel/spade rudder can be made more seaworthy - so many of the more recent boats I look at don"t even sport a skeg - I understand the comments about the market going more toward comfort, beaminess, speed for coastal sailing, but are there other innovations that allow for this design to better weather blue water? For example, the loss of directional stability in large seas: is there some way of deploying a sea anchor, or series drogue, that helps compensate for this?

Or am I simply showing my lack of understanding on these matters?
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  #27  
Old 10-02-2006
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I sail on a small trimaran for most of the time, but crew on a very wide range of other boats.

Nylon rode is nice because it does stretch significantly, and reduce or eliminate the "shock" loads that can occur with an all chain rode. An all chain rode is nice because you can anchor with less scope and it is far more chafe resistant, especially in areas with rock or coral heads. However, if you do use an all chain rode, you really need to have a fairly long nylon snubber, and use it. This gives you the shock absorbing properties of a nylon rode, while retaining the anti-chafe and short scope of an all-chain rode. All-chain rode can be difficult for many smaller cruising boats, as they are far heavier than a combination rode.

A good compromise is often 30-90' of chain and then the rest of the rode being nylon. But this may depend a lot on where you sail. Some areas have relatively deep anchorages, but not much coral—combination rodes make far more sense in those areas. In areas with a lot of coral and rock, an all-chain rode makes more sense.

The main problem with fin keel/spade rudders is that in the case of a grounding or very heavy seas, there is very little support or protection for the rudder. This is not to say that spade rudders aren't seaworthy, but a skeg obviously provides the rudder a lot more support and protection than it sticking out into the water on its own.

Many modern boats are far more beamy and designed to be more "floating condo" than sailboat in some ways. A coastal cruiser can afford the negatives of the changes in modern boat design, far better than a bluewater boat.

Large open spaces found in many newer designs are rather quite dangerous in heavy seas. Getting thrown across a salon that is six feet wide is less dangerous than getting thrown 10 feet. Most modern coastal cruisers don't have any berths that would be suitable for use on a longer, heavy weather open ocean passage. The roomy cabins that sell a boat at a boat show, don't make much sense on a bluewater passage.

One thing that I highly recommend that all boats carry, if they're going to go on longer open-water passages is a Jordan Series Drogue. It is probably one of the best, and most cost-effective pieces of safety gear you can buy.

Hope this helps...
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Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
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Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.

Last edited by sailingdog; 10-02-2006 at 07:45 AM.
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  #28  
Old 10-02-2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by capbillh
"Sarah" is my name for a Simrad Autopilot. It is surely female because you have to be careful to push her buttons the right way.
Nah, Arthur the Autohelm is most definitely male, chugging along on his predetermined course, no 'situational awareness,' oblivious to subtlety, nuances and changes in the outside environment ...
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  #29  
Old 10-02-2006
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Eryka-

So, if you had a wind vane, it'd have a woman's name, but the autopilot is male...
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Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
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  #30  
Old 10-02-2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog
The main problem with fin keel/spade rudders is that in the case of a grounding or very heavy seas, there is very little support or protection for the rudder. This is not to say that spade rudders aren't seaworthy, but a skeg obviously provides the rudder a lot more support and protection than it sticking out into the water on its own.
Besides tracking straighter, I suspect also that the engineering stresses on a fin keel (deep, narrow, with a short attachment to the hull for its area) will be far greater than those on a full or modfied full keel (shallow with a long attachment to the hull); someone like Jeff H can probably give you a more quantitative analysis of this.
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