sleep while solos cruising? - Page 2 - SailNet Community
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #11 of 37 Old 01-06-2007
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 14
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
I've seen too many containers, logs and various dangers at sea to be able to sleep solo at sea. I missed a container once (only one corner was still barely out of the water) by a few feet but I saw it coming since I was on watch. Also investigated many collisions so I personally will not solo on long passages.
Eric
eric3a is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #12 of 37 Old 01-17-2007
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 50
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
 
tgabriel

Thanks for the link to the around the world book. It was great.
Chaunclm is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #13 of 37 Old 01-18-2007
Banned
 
capecodphyllis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 212
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by eric3a
I've seen too many containers, logs and various dangers at sea to be able to sleep solo at sea. I missed a container once (only one corner was still barely out of the water) by a few feet but I saw it coming since I was on watch. Also investigated many collisions so I personally will not solo on long passages.
Eric
Drop a parachute anchor, flip on your masthead strobe and anchor light, and go to sleep.
capecodphyllis is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #14 of 37 Old 01-18-2007
Reward for lost Kraken!
 
hellosailor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 11,563
Thanks: 6
Thanked 137 Times in 134 Posts
Rep Power: 11
   
"flip on your masthead strobe"
Hmmm...intentionally transmitting a false distress beacon. Not a way to make friends at sea.
hellosailor is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #15 of 37 Old 01-19-2007
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Beacon, New York
Posts: 652
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hellosailor
"flip on your masthead strobe"
Hmmm...intentionally transmitting a false distress beacon. Not a way to make friends at sea.
Look at that, I learn something new everyday. I didn’t know a strobe was a “distress” light. In fact I don’t remember seeing that in any book of regulations. Can you point me to a reference for that?
Thanks,
Robert Gainer
Tartan34C is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #16 of 37 Old 01-19-2007
Telstar 28
 
sailingdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,290
Thanks: 0
Thanked 15 Times in 12 Posts
Rep Power: 14
         
Quote:
Originally Posted by hellosailor
"flip on your masthead strobe"
Hmmm...intentionally transmitting a false distress beacon. Not a way to make friends at sea.
I too would like to see the regulations that state a flashing strobe is a distress signal. i don't believe that is the case... and from this web page, I don't see a flashing light listed. The only light that is considered a visual distress signal is a light flashing in an SOS pattern.

Granted, a strobe light is probably not allowed under COLREGS, as flashing lights have specific meanings, but I would rather have a masthead strobe flashing, and have ships around me be aware of me that not have it flashing. Technically, when you're sleeping and single-handing, you're not under command and should be running under two vertically spaced red lights not a flashing strobe.

Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
sailingdog is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #17 of 37 Old 01-19-2007
Senior Member
 
Zanshin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Germany
Posts: 2,297
Thanks: 0
Thanked 29 Times in 27 Posts
Rep Power: 10
 
Quote from the COLREGS:
Quote:
Rule 36 Signals to attract attention

If necessary to attract the attention of another vessel any vessel may make light or sound signals that cannot be mistaken for any signal authorized elsewhere in these Rules, or may direct the beam of her searchlight in the direction of the danger, in such a way as not to embarrass any vessel. Any light to attract the attention of another vessel shall be such that it cannot be mistaken for any aid to navigation. For the purpose of this Rule the use of high intensity intermittent or revolving lights, such as strobe lights, shall be avoided.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Zanshin is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #18 of 37 Old 01-19-2007
Telstar 28
 
sailingdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,290
Thanks: 0
Thanked 15 Times in 12 Posts
Rep Power: 14
         
Zanshin-

While that indicates a strobe should be avoided...it doesn't say that it is a designated DISTRESS signal. If I am out in the middle of the ocean, and single handing, it very well may be that I want to get the attention of the ship, so that it knows that I am there and to avoid me. You seem to be confusing attention and distress. From my reading of the COLREGs this would be an appropriate use of a strobe.

Harbor patrol, marine police, and marine fireboats often use revolving or strobe lights. Does this mean that they are in distress... I think not... It means that they are trying to make sure that they are noticed by other boats. That would be the same purpose of using a masthead strobe when single handing.

Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
sailingdog is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #19 of 37 Old 01-19-2007
Senior Member
 
Zanshin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Germany
Posts: 2,297
Thanks: 0
Thanked 29 Times in 27 Posts
Rep Power: 10
 
Sailingdog - I never stated anything about my interpretation of the COLREGS regarding flashing lights, I just posted the "letter of the law" as it were. But I did a little bit of Googling (which I guess is now a valid verb in English) and found that while opinions differ, most of the interpretations from what I would consider reputable sources indicate that strobes should not be used for the purposes noted in this thread
U.S. Coast Guard
Blue Water Sailing article
to refer to 2 U.S. based posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Zanshin is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #20 of 37 Old 01-19-2007
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Wilmington, DE
Posts: 60
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 10
 
While singlehanding, I take 15 minute naps and then take a visual to see what's around me. Roughly speaking, this should give me time to prepare for the ship that was over the horizon and is now in my sights and steaming my way. i found that for 4-5 day cruises, this was pretty good sleep and that I could take catnaps during the day and still maintain good vigilance.

I think, in general, visibility at night is as good or better for spotting ships as it is in the day. Other objects, like sunken containers, and increasing wave size or rogue waves are much more difficult during a black night.

With regard to heaving-to, I would rather keep moving and get to my destination. Isn't a slow-moving boat as much a target as a faster-moving one? And you've made no progress while heaving-to. I don't like the idea of going down below at all when sailing alone and I don't sleep for any length of time.

I also don't count on radar to alert me to possible collisions. I use it, don't get me wrong, I just prefer to count on my eyes and other senses with radar as a good back-up.

A final note: I always have a trusty companion along with me. At least one dog comes along for any long distance cruising and although I don't count on him to keep guard without interruption, each one has done just that. Even the smallest changes to the environment, bigger waves, dolphins, fish, have always created a need to bark and howl. And they are really great company.
Sialia is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.


User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Retirement Cruising Budgets Randy Harman Cruising Articles 0 05-12-2004 08:00 PM
Calculating the Cost of Cruising Paul & Sheryl Shard Cruising Articles 0 04-03-2003 07:00 PM
Calculating the Cost of Cruising Paul & Sheryl Shard Her Sailnet Articles 0 04-03-2003 07:00 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome