Sailing Conditions and Culture in The Neuse River - Page 2 - SailNet Community
 29Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #11 of 43 Old 03-14-2017
Master Mariner
 
capta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: somewhere south of civilization
Posts: 4,188
Thanks: 87
Thanked 218 Times in 209 Posts
Rep Power: 6
 
Re: Sailing Conditions and Culture in The Neuse River

Quote:
Originally Posted by krisscross View Post
When were you there? I always thought New Bern was pretty clean. Yes, it gets a bit muddy after the rains and the water always has a tint to it from vegetation on coastal plains, but that is how water looks in most places on Pamlico sound.
"When were you there?" ; hurricane season=rainy season!
"tint to it from vegetation on coastal plains, but that is how water looks in most places on Pamlico " exactly!
Who'd want their boating in that, when there's nice clean blue water just a few miles south?

"Any idiot can make a boat go; it takes a sailor to stop one." Spike Africa aboard the schooner Wanderer in Sausalito, Ca. 1964.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

facebook.com/svskippingstone
Our Videos;

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
capta is online now  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #12 of 43 Old 03-14-2017
Senior Member
 
travlin-easy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Maryland - USA
Posts: 5,605
Thanks: 1
Thanked 52 Times in 47 Posts
Rep Power: 7
 
Re: Sailing Conditions and Culture in The Neuse River

That tint has absolutely nothing to do with coastal plain vegetation - that brown color is pig poo, and that is well documented in a documentary and books. Not too many years ago, there was an outbreak of pfiesteria, an insidious dinoflagellate algae that is highly toxic, not only to fish, but humans as well. The worst outbreak took place in the late 1980s and early 1990s, when several manure lagoon dams broke and totally destroyed all life forms in the entire river. The river has never fully recovered and probably never will as long as those massive, industrial hog farms continue to prevail in the river's middle and upper reaches. Kriss, you may want to read https://www.amazon.com/Waters-Turned.../dp/0684838451, a book I have read shortly after interviewing Dr. Jo Ann Burkholder for a major magazine article I wrote during the 1990s. You will be amazed.

The same problem came to fruition in the lower reaches of Chesapeake Bay in the lower and middle reaches of the Pocomoke River in the mid 1990s and early 2000s. Instead of industrial hog farms, in this instance, it was the product of industrial chicken farms, which the Delmarva Peninsula is so famous for. The volume of chicken manure that is spread upon the corn and soy bean fields annually is beyond anyone's wildest imagination. The federal government stepped in, eventually, and provided farmers with grants to construct manure barns in an effort to prevent the manure from washing from the mountains created on farms, to nearby tributaries of Chesapeake Bay. This helped to some degree, but the problem still exists. Fortunately, there have been no recent outbreaks in the Chesapeake's tributaries, but it would not take much more of a nutrient load to produce another disaster.

The other dinoflagellate in both the Neuse and Chesapeake Bay is blue/green algae, which is also highly toxic and can cause some serious skin diseases, and kills dogs and cats that drink the water. At one time there was a health warning on blue/green algae in the Sassafras River's upper and middle reaches, warning people not to have recreational contact with the water, eat the fish and allow their pets near the water. Gives you that warm, fuzzy feeling, doesn't it.

The offshore waters offer some outstanding sailing and as stated above the best inlet is Beaufort Inlet, which is a piece of cake during all weather conditions. There is a great anchorage in the cove just behind The Point (Shackleford Point) where you will find great holding and incredible fishing, along with clean water. I would not, however, recommend swimming there because of the number of big, bull sharks that I have seen while fishing inside the hook behind The Point. Great beach area on the ocean side of The Point, where surf fishermen tend to congregate year round to fish for big bluefish and weakfish.

There are some nice marinas in Beaufort with deep water and good protection from storms. Great area for sailing and fishing alike.

Good Luck,

Gary

Last edited by travlin-easy; 03-14-2017 at 06:59 PM.
travlin-easy is online now  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #13 of 43 Old 03-14-2017 Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
midwesterner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 530
Thanks: 6
Thanked 18 Times in 18 Posts
Rep Power: 2
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by travlin-easy View Post

........N.ot too many years ago, there was an outbreak of pfiesteria, an insidious dinoflagellate algae that is highly toxic, not only to fish, but humans as well. The worst outbreak took place in the late 1980s and early 1990s, when several manure lagoon dams broke and totally destroyed all life forms in the entire river. The river has never fully recovered and probably never will as long as those massive, industrial hog farms continue to prevail in the river's middle and upper reaches..........

Good Luck,

Gary
Well we will likely get to see a lot more of it as they continue to dismantle our EPA.
midwesterner is online now  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
 
post #14 of 43 Old 03-14-2017
Senior Member
 
krisscross's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: NC
Posts: 3,456
Thanks: 32
Thanked 190 Times in 189 Posts
Rep Power: 5
 
Re: Sailing Conditions and Culture in The Neuse River

Quote:
Originally Posted by travlin-easy View Post
Kriss, you may want to read https://www.amazon.com/Waters-Turned.../dp/0684838451, a book I have read shortly after interviewing Dr. Jo Ann Burkholder for a major magazine article I wrote during the 1990s. You will be amazed.
Yes, I know this book and situation very well. But a lot has changed since these days. I have been coming to Pamlico sound for 20 years. And no, the tint in water is from tannin and related plant material, not pigs. I test water for a living.
RichH, twoshoes and Minnesail like this.

Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle.
Plato
krisscross is online now  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #15 of 43 Old 03-14-2017
Senior Member
 
krisscross's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: NC
Posts: 3,456
Thanks: 32
Thanked 190 Times in 189 Posts
Rep Power: 5
 
Re: Sailing Conditions and Culture in The Neuse River

Quote:
Originally Posted by capta View Post
Who'd want their boating in that, when there's nice clean blue water just a few miles south?
For me, Pamlico sound is magic. I can anchor in dozens of beautiful places all over the coastline and not see another boat for couple of days. The water color does not bother me. I swim in it all the time. Many other places south are crowded and noisy.
twoshoes likes this.

Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle.
Plato
krisscross is online now  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #16 of 43 Old 03-14-2017
Senior Member
 
twoshoes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: New Bern, NC
Posts: 242
Thanks: 5
Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts
Rep Power: 7
 
Re: Sailing Conditions and Culture in The Neuse River

Quote:
Originally Posted by capta View Post
I absolutely hated New Boring NC! However, I was a liveaboard captain sheltering there for hurricane season on the owner's orders. The water is always brown and a lot of trash comes down the river when it rains upstream. It might be an OK place to keep a boat for vacation sailing if you enjoy brown shallow water. I think you would need transportation there if you were flying in, as stores and the like are not centrally located.
I would recommend Beaufort, NC instead, as you have access to the Pamlico Sound and the ocean. The ocean entrance is easily sailed in almost any conditions. You also have a few little islands inside the barrier island for picnics and beach bathing. Beaufort was much like a New England fishing village, just with better weather, when I used to visit. The big plus is that you have Morehead City just across the river which is a pretty industrial town, so almost anything you might need can be purchased or fabricated there. It was also a fishing port, so seafood was plentiful and cheap.
How DARE you sir?!

Seriously though Midwesterner, I don't know where you'll live whilst keeping your boat, and indeed if you will be flying in, there are a multitude of places in NC worth looking at.

However, as someone who works and lives in Raleigh, New Bern is a uneventful 1:45 drive away and is a pretty nice town to visit, provided you're not hiding from a hurricane there. The sailing there varies from awesome to sucky as it does just about anywhere, but the people and culture are awesome full time.

My wife and I love it there, and have long term plans of possibly retiring there one day. The Doubletree at my marina has arms open wide for anyone who needs to take a piss.

My second hometown.

Where I keep my second home.

P.S.-If you end up there, be sure to have breakfast at Baker's Kitchen and don't skip the Dutch Potatoes.
mthoma21 likes this.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Last edited by twoshoes; 03-14-2017 at 08:28 PM.
twoshoes is online now  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #17 of 43 Old 03-14-2017
Senior Member
 
twoshoes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: New Bern, NC
Posts: 242
Thanks: 5
Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts
Rep Power: 7
 
Re: Sailing Conditions and Culture in The Neuse River

Quote:
Originally Posted by krisscross View Post
Yes, I know this book and situation very well. But a lot has changed since these days. I have been coming to Pamlico sound for 20 years. And no, the tint in water is from tannin and related plant material, not pigs. I test water for a living.
I too am in the water/water purification business, and have the understanding that the brown water is from tannins from all of our damn conifers in this state. Pine trees are a blight upon this great state and are reason enough alone to stay away from it.
RichH and krisscross like this.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
twoshoes is online now  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #18 of 43 Old 03-15-2017
Wandering Aimlessly
 
PBzeer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Cruising
Posts: 22,027
Thanks: 0
Thanked 100 Times in 97 Posts
Rep Power: 17
     
Re: Sailing Conditions and Culture in The Neuse River

If your main interest is day sailing, then Oriental, to me, is the prime spot, unless you want open water, then Beaufort/Morehead City would be the spot. New Bern, again to me, is the best liveaboard town.
RichH and mthoma21 like this.

John
Ontario 32 - Aria

Free, is the heart, that lives not, in fear.
Full, is the spirit, that thinks not, of falling.
True, is the soul, that hesitates not, to give.
Alive, is the one, that believes, in love.
JCP


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
- Website & Blog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
PBzeer is online now  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #19 of 43 Old 03-15-2017
Senior Member
 
travlin-easy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Maryland - USA
Posts: 5,605
Thanks: 1
Thanked 52 Times in 47 Posts
Rep Power: 7
 
Re: Sailing Conditions and Culture in The Neuse River

Kriss, I have been to locations throughout the world where the waters are tannin stained and in most of those locations, the underwater visibility was still fairly good with distances up to 10 or 12 feet not uncommon, which was the case in many areas of the lower Pocomoke River during he 1950s, long before chicken farming took off on the Delmarva Peninsula. Now the underwater visibility on the same river is zero. When you spin down the water with a centrifuge, the amount of suspended solids in the test tube is often nearly 20 percent of the volume. That's definitely something other than tannin, which shows little or nothing when spun down.

During the past 50 years I have fished the waters of the outer banks and the adjacent sounds several times a year. I have personally witnessed the demise of the water quality both inshore and along the beaches. Believe me, the difference has been dramatic, and the increase in industrial pig farming coincides with the decline of water quality. Granted, you may go swimming in the sound, and so far, suffered no consequences, and I hope you never do. Unfortunately, there are a large number of individuals that have suffered severe problems from waterborne diseases contracted in both Chesapeake Bay and Pamlico Sound, and this is well documented as well. The very last thing you will every want to endure in your life is a mycobacterium infection. I have only seen a few when I worked in medicine, and they are really nasty and difficult to successfully treat. In some instances, amputation of hands and fingers have resulted from Mycobacterium marinum.

As to the EPA, keep in mind they arrived on the scene about 1970, but at the time, they really didn't have much involvement with water quality, mainly concentrating on air pollution problems with the Nixon administration. Water quality problems were mainly left up to the states to resolve, something they tended to turn their back on for political reasons. Consequently, out waterways suffered severely and water pollution ran rampant. Beaches were closed, shellfish and finfish were highly contaminated, and the best the states could come up with was don't go swimming and limit your seafood consumption. And, this is still the case. Currently, there are warnings against swimming in Chesapeake Bay after a rainfall of 2 inches or greater.

Good luck,

Gary

Last edited by travlin-easy; 03-15-2017 at 11:50 AM.
travlin-easy is online now  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #20 of 43 Old 03-15-2017
Senior Member
 
SecondWindNC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Washington, NC
Posts: 531
Thanks: 3
Thanked 10 Times in 7 Posts
Rep Power: 9
 
Re: Sailing Conditions and Culture in The Neuse River

Wow, there's quite a lot going on in this thread. I just have to address a couple of points.

First, the water is brownish due to coastal ecology ie. tannic acid from flowing through watersheds dominated by conifers. I'm certainly not going to argue that upstream runoff, farming and agriculture have not affected the water quality over the years, but they're not the reason for the color/lack of visibility. In my purely observational opinion, eastern NC's rivers are much healthier now than they were 2-3 decades ago when I was growing up, based on the recovery of water grasses, fish, crabs, and ospreys. Personally I credit the gradual improvement of environmental controls upstream and support continued efforts in that direction. For what it's worth, I've been swimming in eastern NC rivers and sounds my whole life and I turned out ok, at least according to my mama.

Second, Ocracoke itself is an amazing and unique place to visit, but Ocracoke Inlet is a fair weather inlet at best, especially for the draft of a sailboat. It can be used but it's shifty and shallow, and can be rough; up-to-date local knowledge is advised. Beaufort Inlet is the ticket if ocean access is what you're looking for. But one of the great things about eastern NC is how much sailing you can do and how many places you can visit without going offshore.

People are generally friendly and welcoming, and there are marina facilities ranging from very nice to, let's say, rustic. The sailing season is long (all year if you don't mind bundling up, but easily 8-9 months for less hardy sailors) and there are tons of secluded creeks to anchor in for protection or just a quiet night on the hook. Currents and tides are negligible save for wind-driven tides. There is generally good wind for sailing, though it can get still and steamy in July/August. As the saying goes, if you don't like the weather, just wait a minute. (For example, within the last week we've had both gorgeous days with temps in the upper 70s, and now highs of 40 and nights in the mid-20s.)

While it sounds like you're not excited about the prospect of being based in NC, I hope you'll find it to be enjoyable while you're here, as have so many who have come from elsewhere and stayed. I'll leave the restroom mess alone except to say I couldn't care less which bathroom you want to use.
RichH, BarryL, twoshoes and 2 others like this.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


Who is staring at the sea is already sailing a little.

Last edited by SecondWindNC; 03-15-2017 at 03:35 PM.
SecondWindNC is online now  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.


User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 2 (0 members and 2 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
From Greece to Egypt on a Sailboat: Reviving Egypt's Sailing Culture - Egyptian Stree NewsReader News Feeds 0 12-09-2015 07:50 PM
Ferry crew rescues Neuse River sailors after sailboat flips - WRAL.com NewsReader News Feeds 0 07-07-2015 03:20 PM
Ferry crew rescues Neuse River sailors after sailboat flips - Greensboro News & Recor NewsReader News Feeds 0 07-07-2015 03:20 AM
When sailboats returned to the Neuse River - New Bern Sun Journal NewsReader News Feeds 0 05-26-2013 05:10 AM
a NEW weblog for sailing culture wbm General Discussion (sailing related) 0 04-07-2005 10:01 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome