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  #51  
Old 04-05-2007
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What probably happened is that the USCG changed their definition, and the NWS never updated the page to match... Government efficiency at its best.

Saurav16-

BTW, the New Jersey coastline is a really bad one to be stuck off of in bad weather. Most, if not all, of the harbors are very treacherous to enter in heavy weather, which makes it fairly dangerous for a smaller boat that gets caught off of it in heavy weather.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
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—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #52  
Old 04-05-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog
What probably happened is that the USCG changed their definition, and the NWS never updated the page to match... Government efficiency at its best.

Saurav16-

BTW, the New Jersey coastline is a really bad one to be stuck off of in bad weather. Most, if not all, of the harbors are very treacherous to enter in heavy weather, which makes it fairly dangerous for a smaller boat that gets caught off of it in heavy weather.

You forgot to also say very shallow.......
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  #53  
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Good point Freesail... yes, much of the NJ coastline is very shallow, which is a major contributor to why it is so dangerous to enter most of the harbors there in a storm... storm surge becomes really nasty breaking waves in along a lot of it...
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #54  
Old 04-05-2007
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Mike's boat will be Ok. The single handed part is not my first choice for any extended passage making, anything can happen and every option is welcome.

I may go along with Mike on this cruise but don't think I can stay long enough for the return trip. Perhaps some of the other folks might be interested in fostering the return side?

I say, Mike, go for it and have some fun, learn something new and don't get stuck wishin' you were somewhere else.

Bob in Rockport
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Old 04-05-2007
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So basically for sailing around NJ you really have to watch the weather and make sure you won't get caught up in a storm even if you plan on hopping port to port, is that accurate?
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So basically for sailing around NJ you really have to watch the weather and make sure you won't get caught up in a storm even if you plan on hopping port to port, is that accurate?
Pretty much.... if the weather catches you out, and you can't make it back to a port before it gets nasty... head offshore...being close to shore off the NJ coast is generally unwise in bad weather. It gets bad really fast.

The deeper the water is under you, the less dangerous the storm surge is going to be... but you're trading that off for the possibility of larger waves due to a much longer fetch, depending on the wind direction and such.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #57  
Old 04-06-2007
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"So basically" yes.

If you look at the charts--and you must get the charts--you'll see there are large stretches where the water is way less than 100' deep extending offshore. If the wind is blowing from offshore, and the water hits the shoals, you'll get a lot of wave action. Now, add whatever current or rain flooding is coming off the land in the opposite direction, or out of entrances to harbors.

More chop, while the wind is trying to push you onto a lee shore, and in a 27' boat you don't have a lot of power to fight that. Some of the entrance channels are also narrow, lots of shoaling and changing conditions with rock jetties on both sides. Add a bit of fog, and you've got a recipe for disaster.

I know someone who was lost within sight of shore near Egg Harbor Inlet a couple of years ago, even the USCG could not launch out the inlets to search for him.

But, it good weather? Great places to go sailing. Basically, if the weathercast shows good weather all around you, and you know it can't close in before you get back ashore, you're OK. But on the days when the weatherman are mumbling about occluded fronts and stalled systems and the probability of whatever, you've got to be more careful.
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Old 04-06-2007
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Just curious, not planning to do it, but what about in a CS34?
As a CS owner, you are truly a member of an elite, revered sector of the yachting fraternity. Your boat is capable of going anywhere you wish. Were you to fit a watermaker and additional beer fridge, a non-stop circumnavigation is not an unreasonable idea.
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As an alternative you could take part of the trip through the Barnegat bay, entering at the Manasquan inlet you could make it down to Atlantic city leaving only a shorter hop to Cape May. Of course the bay route is restricted by what you draft, and your patience.
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Old 04-10-2007
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Mike,

Sounds good to me, and in five to six weeks there’ll be 300,000 college students in the greater Boston area with nothing to do. But then again, problems with your crew can be as serious as any problem the North Atlantic can brew up. Even if you obtain crew, a bad experience on the way over will make a one-way flight home reasonably inexpensive.

As for the vessel, if you trust it and can handle reefing, sea anchoring, and possible knock-downs, obtain and register an EPIRB, rent/purchase a satellite phone, and create a land based contact network, it’s promising.

All the best,
Pete
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