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Go Back   SailNet Community > Out There > Cruising & Liveaboard Forum
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  #21  
Old 05-10-2007
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My wife and I have been making a living as prostitutes. Year to date my wife has made $154,321.87, while I have made $3.45. When you combine both incomes, that comes to almost $154,325. Not too shabby. My wife comes home from work feeling "exhilerated," while I've managed to keep my chin up during the rough stretches. On occasion an elderly gentleman client of mine will race off in his Zodiak without paying for his "backrub," but otherwise things seem to be going pretty smoothly.
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  #22  
Old 05-10-2007
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Actually I need to talk with you about that... I'd like my $3.45 back.
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  #23  
Old 05-10-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kernix
Wow - I have lots of quality equipment, but I would go freelance before stock - I'd even spend most cruising to get to spots to add to my library of pics and also cruise to art festivals and put up booths.

I already have a list of 60+ art galleries, magazines and other printed material editors who've I've contacted that buy what I shoot - some give you 5-10 day assignments like Backpacker who pay $400/day for up to 10 days - granted you'll have to follow other backpackers and you'll be humping one heavy backpack, but that's how you get payed by them (assuming you deliver quality pics). Other assignments do not pay as well but also don't involve that much exertion.

I'm hoping that the freelance thang along with either web-design or database programming will pay good (enough?) money.

We shall see....
You are overlooking that doing those kind of jobs is pretty tough if you are cruising fulltime. Let's say you are sailing around in the BVIs and Backpacker Magazine wants you to go to Alaska for 10 days. You are on a sailboat so you don't likely have all your backpacking gear with you so you need to fly home. Then, you need to fly to Alaska. Of course, you just got the message they want to do the job three days after they contacted you. You need to get somewhere that you can leave your boat safely and catch a flight. That could take days. I also suspect that they are unlikely to pay for your flight from BVIs to your home and then pay travel from your home to Alaska. Unless you are a really incredible photographer, you won't get that assignment because they would have a much easier time hiring someone else.

A big part of freelance photography or writing is being able to have good communications between you and your client. I also worked at a publishing company as a Project Manager and hired freelancers. The ones I gave preference to in hiring were easy to contact and always met their deadlines.

As for stock, I know people who average about $2000/month over the course of a year.
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  #24  
Old 05-10-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Allanbc
You are overlooking that doing those kind of jobs is pretty tough if you are cruising fulltime. Let's say you are sailing around in the BVIs and Backpacker Magazine wants you to go to Alaska for 10 days. You are on a sailboat so you don't likely have all your backpacking gear with you so you need to fly home. Then, you need to fly to Alaska. Of course, you just got the message they want to do the job three days after they contacted you. You need to get somewhere that you can leave your boat safely and catch a flight. That could take days. I also suspect that they are unlikely to pay for your flight from BVIs to your home and then pay travel from your home to Alaska. Unless you are a really incredible photographer, you won't get that assignment because they would have a much easier time hiring someone else.

A big part of freelance photography or writing is being able to have good communications between you and your client. I also worked at a publishing company as a Project Manager and hired freelancers. The ones I gave preference to in hiring were easy to contact and always met their deadlines.

As for stock, I know people who average about $2000/month over the course of a year.

I've already done my homework - Backpacker uses regional freelancers - meaning, if I live in the North East I'll be the guy they call when they want something from PA, NY, or DE since I live in Philly.

Secondly, me freelance would dictate my cruising - call it "sub-cruising" but I would basically "drive" to work - So I won't be in the BVI's and subject matter for mags are determined and edited within 3 days - plus how many peeps would drop all given 3 days notice - I don't think that will be the norm - so basically, I will not be in BVI when I should be somewhere else - do you understand

Communication - that's a given for everything

Easy to contact - cell phones and email are readily available - I won't be in the middle of the Atlantic without satellite signal

Meeting deadlines - I've been doing that all my life in my normal job - don't understand why you would think I would all of a sudden become loser bum not meeting my responsibilities.

Stock - $2000/mo - wow - how many 1000's of pics do they have and are they part owner in the stock company\archives? I've known 2 or more photographers to joing forces and create one massive stock selection of pics - I'm not one of them - if I can do that some day, then I too will make $2000/mo - and I know the amount of keeper pics I get in the first year of going fulltime would be better than my #'s now.
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So to answer your BVI-Alaska thang - I would never be asked to work in Alaska - moreover, I would keep a monthly contact so as to get an idea where & when I would be needed - if at all - there's no reason to assume that they would use me once a year or more - that's why after contacting 200-300 potential clients, I narrowed down to 60+ where our interests\needs meet.
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Old 05-10-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 42ndstreet
Valiente, excellent reply. As are the others. We would like to go with a 40-42'Beneteau or similar. I believe we can make it on 25k a yr. We will have about 250k in cash. We will buy used. I guess we better get moving on debt reduction.
My budget is about $25K/yr. also, and to achieve that, I'm putting money upfront into ground tackle, windlass, "overkill" battery banks and solar/wind/small genset options. We want self-sufficiency not only because it makes us feel more capable, but because being on the hook is far cheaper. I won't mind things like Panama Canal transits and the *occasional* dock stay if my usual course is to drop anchor or to pick up a free mooring.

I 40% mortgaged my house to get the boat (we paid it off in seven years previously to that) in order to "capture" the equity run-up since we bought it in 1998. While a good 70% of what we borrowed paid directly for the boat, there's enough left over to do some house reno in order to make it into two rental units. Our plan is to have tenants cover the mortgage while gone due to the fact that mortgage interest is deductable on rental properties here. In other words, it's actually a win on the tax side to NOT have a paid off house that is also a "principal residence".

We plan on selling the current 'expedition' boat after five years. I have already confirmed that a sale in Europe rather than in Canada, where we bought it, should command a 20-30% premium, as northern Europeans recognize the value in a steel pilothouse cutter that has been well-maintained and continuously upgraded. So basically, in my broadest planning, we will return after five or so years, move back in to half our house (which will seem like a palace of empty space!), and I will do a crewed transatlantic to get the boat to England or Holland and liveaboard until she sells.

The proceeds from that should pay off the remaining mortgage. We would likely keep one of the two "apartments" as a rental unit to provide a base income (our food and utilities, etc.) until we re-establish ourselves. I intend to do travel and sail writing (I've been nationally published in other fields since the mid-'80s, and figure I have a good crack at keeping that going at sea), and will likely do so after we return.

Then I will retrieve my "loaner" boat, a 33 footer cruiser-racer and start looking for a job again.

There is a load of information on prepping for voyaging. There is less information on "life after cruising" for those taking a mid-life sabbatical. Maybe there's a book in that, eh? Anyway, the logic of taking a "retirement" is unassailable, pun intended. We are young and healthy enough to enjoy and work as needed aboard, and debt doesn't scare me, having paid off a house once already.

Of course, if I can make enough cruising kitty money while on passage to pay for cruising and maintenance, maybe we'll just stay out there for the rest of our lives. There are worse fates.
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  #27  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kernix
I've already done my homework - Backpacker uses regional freelancers - meaning, if I live in the North East I'll be the guy they call when they want something from PA, NY, or DE since I live in Philly.

Secondly, me freelance would dictate my cruising - call it "sub-cruising" but I would basically "drive" to work - So I won't be in the BVI's and subject matter for mags are determined and edited within 3 days - plus how many peeps would drop all given 3 days notice - I don't think that will be the norm - so basically, I will not be in BVI when I should be somewhere else - do you understand

Communication - that's a given for everything

Easy to contact - cell phones and email are readily available - I won't be in the middle of the Atlantic without satellite signal

Meeting deadlines - I've been doing that all my life in my normal job - don't understand why you would think I would all of a sudden become loser bum not meeting my responsibilities.

Stock - $2000/mo - wow - how many 1000's of pics do they have and are they part owner in the stock company\archives? I've known 2 or more photographers to joing forces and create one massive stock selection of pics - I'm not one of them - if I can do that some day, then I too will make $2000/mo - and I know the amount of keeper pics I get in the first year of going fulltime would be better than my #'s now.
The original poster in this thread is asking about work while circumnavigating. While your solution might work for you, it isn't practical for someone circumnavigating. Your solution wouldn't work for someone wanting to cruise fulltime either.
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  #28  
Old 05-10-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phallo153
Actually I need to talk with you about that... I'd like my $3.45 back.
That really hurts. I may not be the "fittest" male prostitute, and I may not brush my teeth or bathe every single week, but I do feel that I "give my all" to each and every client. That money is mine. I worked hard for it, and I'm not refunding a penny.
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  #29  
Old 05-10-2007
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sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
Umm. one thing Kernix has overlooked... high-end photo equipment and small boats do not generally mix all that well. Salt air and high-humidity is death on good camera equipment... I speak from experience, having been a photog for over 25 years at this point...
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #30  
Old 05-10-2007
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I'll attest to that. Years ago, as a result of using my photography gear onboard, my pre-digital AF Nikon film cameras and several expensive AF Nikon lenses, all had rusted screws. Some aluminum components suffered the corrosive effects of the salt water environment as well . . . and I brought the stuff home after use. I can only imagine the damage resulting from liveboard usage.
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