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post #1 of 51 Old 05-09-2007 Thread Starter
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How Do We Make a Living?

My wife and I have a goal of circumnavigating in 2012. We will be in our late 40's at the time of departure. We will have enough money to purchase and outfit a used 40' sailboat. Also, we should have enough money to make the first year in expenses. We like to live frugally, but also want to enjoy a restaurant now and then. My question is this:
What ways have you seen cruisers make additional money along the way?
Would it be better to make it from land jobs, or other cruisers? My wife is a RN with 25 yrs experience(good anywhere) and I am an insurance agent(not much good outside of NY). I am physically fit and speak alot of spanish(almost fluent). Also, very good with people. BTW-we do have a large amount of money in our 401k but will not touch it until age 60.
Thanks ahead of time.
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post #2 of 51 Old 05-09-2007
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You don't say what your boat budget, or expected budget for the first year's expenses are listed at. Do you have any idea of what boat you're interested in getting?

Getting land jobs is somewhat fraught with danger, as many countries will have strict policies against it... and getting caught can be very serious. Do you have any mechanical or boat repair-related skills?? Those skills can often be worthwhile. Some computer skills, writing, photography, art, all are potential ways of making money abroad as well.

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post #3 of 51 Old 05-09-2007
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I meant to ask this question as well. I currently work as a network manager which does not lend itself well to being out of the office. But at one time I was a programmer and that has at least the potential to be something that could be done on a boat disconnected or connected via a very slow link. Especially if it was programing something nautical like radars or something(I am grasping).

Anyway are there any other computer types out there that have considered trying to code and cruise at the same time? I suppose if people can write you can code but I am just curious if anyone has actually done it and how practical it is.

Sorry if this is a thread hijacking.
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post #4 of 51 Old 05-09-2007
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Both you and your wife and hugley3 have specific knowledge that could be leveraged prior to heading out. You could put together an information product or training that generates dollars via limited marketing. You could have a product that helps consumers make better insurance choices or a training that helps agents generate or close more leads.

The boomers are aging fast (aren't we?) and the market for health info is bigger than Buster Brown's market in the 60's. Do you think that a nurse with 25+ years experience has credibility? Most people trust nurses more than doctors. I'd buy her ebook on the right topic.

You could also divert your 401 contributions into investments for a few years that generate dollars NOW. You don't need to make a million from any of these. 2-3k per month and you should be able to extend your cruise as long as you want to.

Hope this helps and good luck with your goals. Having the goal puts you way ahead of the pack.

LH

Oh and Huguley what about a piece on the 10 biggest pitfalls for network managers or the 5 biggest mistakes made with networks or something? You are probably geeky (compliment) enough to do a web based training thing. Don't work while you are out there, work now and let it work for you while you are gone. Compared to sailing, work sucks.
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post #5 of 51 Old 05-09-2007
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I am currently a software engineer working from home. I can tell you that this is absolutely incompatible with cruising. And it's not what I would have expected previously - equipment is no issue (most of my work is done on a single laptop), neither is network (I don't need internet most of the time).
However, one thing that is at premium is time. Stuff that people pay for requires 8-10 hours of actual work a day, 5 days a week. That does not leave much time for sailing, or doing anything else for that matter.

Working less than that a week would be paid accordingly, and working a few hours a week (which is what would be compatible with cruising) would likely not pay at all. Of course YMMV, as always.
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Coding isn't really practical IMHO as a cruising profession. Web design can be... programming often needs far more face-to-face interaction between the programmer and client IMHO.

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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
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post #7 of 51 Old 05-09-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog
Coding isn't really practical IMHO as a cruising profession. Web design can be... programming often needs far more face-to-face interaction between the programmer and client IMHO.
In some cases it does, in others - less so. I speak with my client (employer?) at most twice a week on IM. It depends on what the product is. In systems development product objective could be pretty well defined early on, and everything else is essentially a direct derivation of that.

Honestly, this job would be perfect if only it took less than 70% of my waking hours
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brak
Honestly, this job would be perfect if only it took less than 70% of my waking hours
That leaves you a bit short of time for cruising, or doing boat maintenance.

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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
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her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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post #9 of 51 Old 05-09-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog
That leaves you a bit short of time for cruising, or doing boat maintenance.
No kidding.

IMHO cruising and work are incompatible for most people except, perhaps, writers and an occasional high-demand-highly-paid professional (though hanging out in the islands wearing old T-shirt and sipping painkillers all day would reduce that demand pretty quickly, I think )
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post #10 of 51 Old 05-09-2007
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Brak:
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perhaps, writers and an occasional high-demand-highly-paid professional (though hanging out in the islands wearing old T-shirt and sipping painkillers all day would reduce that demand pretty quickly, I thin
Careful, I resemble that remark. Actually, I wish the demand would subside some. Damn, I have to work an hour tomorrow after working an hour yesterday!! Where did today go? Don't have a clue.

Oh well, no rest for the weary.

Just checking in.
Where ya'll keep'n the wimmin 'round here?
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