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  #11  
Old 11-23-2007
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Rockter will become famous soon enough
I would boom out the headsail. I would never fly a spinnaker alone. My ship is 36 ft and the spinnaker is simply too much alone.
For a 2-3 day run you probably would not sleep much anyway, as it will be so new.
You will when you stop though.
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  #12  
Old 11-23-2007
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Tartan34C will become famous soon enough
Quote:
Originally Posted by RandyonR3 View Post
Its not a trip line, at the center of the spinnaker about half way up. I've sewn in a small loop with backing.. (kind of a belly button) with a light weight line running to the loop. when you pull the loop, the spinnaker deflates or folds up...
The idea comes from racing Dinghys a number of years ago. we had a shoot scoop in the front of the dinghy.. (a tube holding the spinnaker).
the spinnaker would be pulled back into the tube by its "belly button". This way it would be ready to deploy on the next down wind run. Again its not a trip line as all lines stay conected, it just deflates the spinnaker..
If you take your spinnaker into a sail shop, he will know what you are looking for...
Not sure I follow this. Where do you run the line? Do you pull the center of the spinnaker down to the deck with the bunt of the sail just streaming forward or do you have the light line lead to the mast above the spinnaker pole track so the entire sail can just billow out forward off the mast. How do you handle the line when you pass the pole from side to side? Does the pole topping lift cross the line to the ring on the sail or do need to drop the sail when you jibe?
Thanks,
Robert Gainer
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  #13  
Old 11-24-2007
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The line drops to the deck and is run back to the cockpit.. If you pull on the line, it take the bag out of the sail and the sides flop in the wind.. If you drop the halyard and reliese the sheets, you could pull the kite right back down the side of the boat... On my smaller boat I had a bag at the companian way that I would shove the kite into..
On my First-42, i have a sleave, or sock that pulls down over the kit.
The main reason for the belly button ring, is for emergencies to deflate the sail....
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  #14  
Old 11-24-2007
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I've done most of my sailing single handed. Launching a spinnaker is nuts... kudos to anyone who can do that... I'll stick with drifters. Consider getting a backup auto-pilot... one that has auto-tack is always nice. Radar allows you to setup alarm circles which are a life saver, an alarm goes off when something crosses an imaginary line. It allows you to get some sleep. Jack lines shouldn't be considered optional. I agree with others, coming and going are the toughest part because of traffic, once you're a day out things are easier.

Just keep in mind... I think it's 10 minutes from horizon to impact (something like that) for ships at sea and I've heard, off shore, these guys don't even have people on watch most of the time. Given 2-3 days you might be in too close for radar alarms to work - which means you're really just counting on luck when you're asleep.
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  #15  
Old 11-25-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RandyonR3 View Post
The line drops to the deck and is run back to the cockpit.. If you pull on the line, it take the bag out of the sail and the sides flop in the wind.. If you drop the halyard and reliese the sheets, you could pull the kite right back down the side of the boat... On my smaller boat I had a bag at the companian way that I would shove the kite into..
On my First-42, i have a sleave, or sock that pulls down over the kit.
The main reason for the belly button ring, is for emergencies to deflate the sail....
OK, I got it now. An interesting idea and I need to think about it a bit.
Thanks,
Robert Gainer
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Study the history of naval architecture and move forward knowing what didnít work before.

Donít waste time making the same old mistakes but instead make new ones and to insure your place in history be sure the mistakes are big ones.

Never design a mast that is weaker then the boat
Never design a boat that is weaker then the mast

Never listen to someone describe why your project will not work unless they can show you the broken pieces of their own version.
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  #16  
Old 11-25-2007
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sailaway21 is just really nice sailaway21 is just really nice sailaway21 is just really nice sailaway21 is just really nice
wiselyb,
While completely agreeing with your point on watch-keeping I am, once again, dismayed to see someone espousing the idea that merchant ships do not have anyone on watch. It is especially ironic that the "belief" comes up while we're discussing how the single-handing sailor can best figure out how to not keep a proper watch in the pursuit of sleep. Reality is that it is the sailboat, single-handed or full complement, that is more likely to not be keeping a proper lookout. The idea that it is common practise to navigate a $150 million dollar ship with no lookout is the same type of thinking that allows 16 year old boys to believe that the Ferrari dealer will let them take one out for a test drive.

Again, I fully agree with the rest of your points, especially that one is essentially relying on luck when relying on non-visual means for watch-keeping.

Why is there no advise or movement for the advocation of say International orange sails for the offshore single hander? See and be seen is the watchword for safety. Is it that they don't look "pretty"? You can always tell the ships that come out of the North Sea, where the normal conditions seem to be Force 4-6 and the whitecaps are omnipresent on a dark sea. Black hulls and white houses of ships blend in as if camoflaged. Most North Sea ships have the Bridge Deck wind dodger painted international orange for improved visibility to other ships. I don't see sailmakers even offering such an option on sails beyond the odd orange dot on a storm jib. Just a thought.
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  #17  
Old 11-25-2007
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Rockter will become famous soon enough
Sailaway....

Keeping watch on a merchantman is a bit more than looking out the window. They could just, perhaps, maybe, possibly, combine that with answering the VHF when I try to call them to tell them that winds are light and my motor's down and I am in the last 80 miles of a 2700 mile trip from Bermuda and I am not quite sure if they have seen me and that their navigation lights look like they are going to run into me and they show no sign of having noticed.

There were 3 on board my ship.
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  #18  
Old 11-25-2007
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Sailaway-

Part of the problem is getting the material for the sail in large enough sizes. Most sailmakers don't stock much in the way of heavy-weight sail cloth that isn't white.
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  #19  
Old 11-25-2007
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Do we all forget one of the main reasons we are out there.. For a lot of us, the pease and tranquality of cruising, or sailing is our escape from that which we live daily. the noise, the street signs, the people, and of corse..the laws that govern our silly asses. Out there is our freedom, and If you want to get up in the morning and pee off the back of your boat.
Well by-golly thats my right.. I quit riding motorcycles when they passed the helmet law, for no other reason other than ,that the government is sticking their nose into my life to far.
and how far will they go.. and say its for my own good....Orange sails for singlehanded sailing, Manditory GPSs on your boat so they can track you, or inforcement of wearing PFD while sailing (not to comfortable in bed),
Well I for one, injoy my morning pee off the back of my boat, but I know, someday, they'll take that away from me too...
For those of you that love what you have, dont give it up, and for damn sure, dont put restrictions on what we have now.....
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  #20  
Old 11-25-2007
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Tartan34C will become famous soon enough
Sailaway21,
An orange storm sail is a great idea. My sail maker is Thurston in RI and he has quoted my storm sails in orange. But how much attention do you want on a typical day. Orange is a recognized signal of distress and I donít want the ships to make a habit of getting too close to check me out or even worse make orange lose it meaning as a signal of distress. Maybe a good compromise is to use tanbark. It stands out but doesnít have the same meaning as orange. By the way I got your PM.

Sailingdog,
You can order small runs of cloth so getting enough orange isnít the problem even if you are an amateur sailmaker.
All the best,
Robert Gainer
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Study the history of naval architecture and move forward knowing what didnít work before.

Donít waste time making the same old mistakes but instead make new ones and to insure your place in history be sure the mistakes are big ones.

Never design a mast that is weaker then the boat
Never design a boat that is weaker then the mast

Never listen to someone describe why your project will not work unless they can show you the broken pieces of their own version.
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