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navtron 11-23-2007 12:26 PM

Singlehanding
 
What do you think about it....doing a 2-3 day run Offshore? Has anyone experience on this...How often have you done this...Doug

Tartan34C 11-23-2007 12:37 PM

I think single-handing is fine and I have covered a lot of miles including going trans-Atlantic that way. The only trick is to do everything in a way that doesnít require that you be in two places at the same time. Plan the flow of work so that things can either be done from one place or that all work can be done sequencely as you move about the boat.

The trickiest thing has been setting and recovering a spinnaker by myself with a close second being planning far enough ahead to allow for boat handling without an engine.
All the best,
Robert Gainer

AjariBonten 11-23-2007 12:40 PM

I know I have very limited sailing experience; but I can't imagine dealing with a spinnaker while singlehanding. It seems to me that even experienced sailors with a small crew can get in trouble with a spinnaker; or is that just a perception created by "You Tube"? . LOLOL

PBzeer 11-23-2007 12:51 PM

If you're talking about coastal hops offshore, the biggest problem I have found is getting sufficent rest. I plan my "naps" around when I'm in areas where there shouldn't be a lot of, if any, commercial vessel traffic. And as Robert said, you should plan ahead so you don't have to do two things at once.

While you can certainly make some time running overnight, I try to limit mine to one night between inlets. Keeps the fatigue factor managable.

sailingdog 11-23-2007 01:22 PM

Many singlehanders I know prefer to cat nap during the day...and sail more at night... this is due to a couple of factors... one less traffic at night in many areas; two—a better watch is probably required at night, since the other boats are going to be less vigilant.

IMHO, high-traffic coastal areas, like the approach corridors to major ports are a nightmare...and best avoided as much as possible. :D

max-on 11-23-2007 03:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by navtron (Post 227049)
What do you think about it....doing a 2-3 day run Offshore? Has anyone experience on this...How often have you done this...Doug

This is such a wide-open question with many topics that we could address. There are many articles / books written about this in the single-hand racing context.

To be helpful with a response, could you elaborate with specific questions, or discuss your sailing experience and knowledge of boat systems - are you already comfortable single-handing your boat for day sails and you are asking about overnight / multi-day trips, or do you have little to no single-handing experience.

You also mention offshore, what is offshore to you, Newport to Annapolis following the coast or Newport to Bermuda, what is your experience going offshore with crew, what are your skills with navigation, weather forecasting, seamanship, etc. Does your boat have the requisite equipment and do you know how to use it; for single-handing do you have jacklines and hard points installed, rigging / sailhanding setup, do you have a quality self-steering and do you know how to fix it when it breaks, if not a windvane, have you addressed batter capacity and charging. We could discuss sleep management and watch keeping and egg timers. We could talk about sailing conservatively and thinking out / knowing every step of how to do something before you do it.

More information would help to identify and to answer your questions.

Tartan34C 11-23-2007 05:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AjariBonten (Post 227058)
I know I have very limited sailing experience; but I can't imagine dealing with a spinnaker while singlehanding. It seems to me that even experienced sailors with a small crew can get in trouble with a spinnaker; or is that just a perception created by "You Tube"? . LOLOL

Its not hard but you need to keep an eye on the wind. If things look like the wind will increase you need to get the chute down quickly because you will have trouble dealing with any and I mean any problems if you are single-handed.

To set the spinnaker on larger boats I prepare it first by forming it into a long sausage and tying it together ever few feet with thread. Then I can raise it by passing it under the boom and into the lee of the main. When itís fully up I pull the tack to the pole and that breaks the lower threads. The wind gets into it and breaks the other threads as I am trimming the sheet.

On my 22 footer during my first trans-Atlantic I set the spinnaker by putting it into a paper shopping bag and after hosting it to the masthead pulled the guy and it popped out of the bag and streamed ahead of the boat while I trimmed the guy and then the sheet. I donít do that any more and now I use the thread stops on all boats unless I have crew. Dropping paper bags allover the place just seems like the wrong thing to do nowadays.
All the best,
Robert Gainer

RandyonR3 11-23-2007 06:19 PM

I've raced with the Singled Handed Society for a few years now, and Last year I brought my 42 down from the north west to San Francisco by myself..Great trip, Flyin a kite is a chalange, I added a "belly button" ring on mine so I could deflate it if things got rough..
My sleep patterns were such that I'd dose off for 30 minutes at a time. and I read a good article recently concerning standing watch..
The next tanker or container ship that passes you, count the time it takes to disappear. thats the time it would take for something UNSEEN to get to your boat...
I did make a point on staying clipped in at all times, use Jack lines, and because the weather was warm, I slept in the cockpit, and set an alarm on your Radar. I set mine for 6 miles, as that would give me plenty time to make adjustments..
The trip took me around 2 weeks...and I loved it.......

Tartan34C 11-23-2007 06:32 PM

How do you rig the trip line to the ring?
Thanks,
Robert Gainer

RandyonR3 11-23-2007 07:52 PM

Its not a trip line, at the center of the spinnaker about half way up. I've sewn in a small loop with backing.. (kind of a belly button) with a light weight line running to the loop. when you pull the loop, the spinnaker deflates or folds up...
The idea comes from racing Dinghys a number of years ago. we had a shoot scoop in the front of the dinghy.. (a tube holding the spinnaker).
the spinnaker would be pulled back into the tube by its "belly button". This way it would be ready to deploy on the next down wind run. Again its not a trip line as all lines stay conected, it just deflates the spinnaker..
If you take your spinnaker into a sail shop, he will know what you are looking for...


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