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  #51  
Old 02-11-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Valiente View Post
I think weather cloths (with the boat's name, naturally), are a great spray and wind break (and most sailors like to break wind, in my experience). I see no reason why they can't be made up the same time as the lee clothes for the sea berths...something else a lot of boats seem to have forgotten these days.
I always get in trouble talking about sea cloths in the UK. Here they are called "dodgers," and what a yank would call a dodger is called a "sprayhood."

Also, you have a pushpit at the stern, and in most cases the boom vang is a kicker.

Finally, don't even dream of calling a floating dock anything but a pontoon.
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  #52  
Old 02-11-2008
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I'm gradually outfitting my boat for the eventual cruise and agree with the 'going small and simple' approach. I like the idea of having a handheld GPS, or two, or three, or four, as a system independent of the ship's power. I'll be adding this to my list of purchases for the boat.

One of the things I'll be installing this year on my boat is a wind-vane, a fleming 301 global minor, which I got for a very good deal. I don't see windvanes around much and I'm not sure if most of the boats in my area don't cruise far or if everyone is using electric autopilots instead. I use the electric autopilot now and then but I wouldn't want to trust it to keep up with my boat's yawing on a bad sea or use all that electricity. I've also sailed a fair amount with sheet to tiller arrangements, which work to varying degrees, but I think of this as more of a back-up plan if my windvane breaks.

I like having my systems as simple and as manual as possible, with back-ups and spares. My boat is rigged with an inner forestay and running back-stays to add extra sail arrangements and mast support if needed. New oversized rigging. I have a GPS unit and a chartplotter, depthsounder, VHF (with DSC interfaced with both GPS units) and lighting (interior, deck level nav., masthead nav., spreader work light, steaming) for my electrical draws, which I think is fairly modest. One 60W solar panel and four 6v batteries keep up with all this fine. I also have manual charts and all the tools and use them. Manual lavac head. Alcohol stove. Lots of anchoring gear. No refridgerator. No internal engine; I have a small 6hp outboard (two tanks, two fuel lines) for docking and getting home without any wind. It seems like a lot of people spend A LOT of time and money on their engines and maintenence. Jordan drogue. Life raft. And lots of other stuff.

Most importantly, I get out there and sail as much as the short Maine season will allow. I love to read and plan but I'm a 'hands-on' kinda guy and getting out on the water in my boat is the best way to apply what I've learned and improve my skills.

Congratulations of your most recent passage, Vega, and thanks for letting me know that my modest boat and approach to outfitting isn't unseaworthy or dated.
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  #53  
Old 02-11-2008
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One thing no one has mentioned yet is rope. Can't have too much in my opinion. It would be ideal if one type and size would work for every application but, unfortunately, on my boat at least, this is not the case. The size of the halyards is limited by the maximum size of the masthead sheaves to 3/8 inch rope. While plenty strong enough for any application except possibly anchoring and mooring lines, that is just too small to be comfortable in the hands for sheets and downhauls etc. so I wind up with 3/8" halyards and sheets of 7/16" braided polyester (Dacron), as are the spare jib halyard and the topping lift which can double as a spare main halyard. Besides the lines rigged, we carry an extra 100 feet of 3/8" and 200 feet of 7/16" braided Dacron and 200 feet of 1/4 inch Amsteel(Dyneema) for emergency standing rigging repairs. We also carry a spool of 3/16 polyester for lashings and other miscellaneous uses around the boat.

Anchor rodes and dock lines are of 1/2 inch three-strand nylon. We also carry a thirty foot pendant with a nylon thimble and shackle on one end and an eye splice on the other plus four fifty foot lengths and one additional heavy anchor rode, 300 feet, all of 5/8" three strand nylon. That is in addition to 100 feet of 3/8 inch proof coil chain plus two fifty foot lengths of 1/4 inch chain for the 1/2 inch anchor rodes. (We carry two 10kg Bruces and two Danforths)

I'm sure some of you are laughing and shaking your heads but I do this for a reason. During our unexpectedly long Pacific crossing, our halyards chafed nearly through at the masthead. I had to end for end the sheets due to chafe and replace the jib tack downhaul with an old sheet which nearly chafed through by the time we reached land. As for the ground tackle and mooring lines; I've been through two hurricanes. The morning the sirens go off is no time to discover you don't have enough rope to secure the boat.

Ideally, I'd have everything rigged with 1/2 inch braided dacron and buy a 600 foot spool of the stuff. But that would require major modifications to the masthead to accomodate the sheaves and all the blocks on the boat would have to be replaced. 3/8 inch would be strong enough for everything except anchor lines and would fit all of the blocks and sheaves but it's just to small for my hands so as long as I have this boat I guess I'm stuck with at least three kinds of rope for rigging.

Lest some "Yachtsman" get the urge to correct me on calling it rope. I learned as a trainee on a square rigger that it's rope until you put it to work. A coil in the locker is always rope until you reeve it through a block or attach it to the clew of the jib. Then it becomes a line.
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  #54  
Old 02-11-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by soulesailor View Post
I'm gradually outfitting my boat for the eventual cruise and agree with the 'going small and simple' approach. I like the idea of having a handheld GPS, or two, or three, or four, as a system independent of the ship's power. I'll be adding this to my list of purchases for the boat.

One of the things I'll be installing this year on my boat is a wind-vane, a fleming 301 global minor, which I got for a very good deal. I don't see windvanes around much and I'm not sure if most of the boats in my area don't cruise far or if everyone is using electric autopilots instead. I use the electric autopilot now and then but I wouldn't want to trust it to keep up with my boat's yawing on a bad sea or use all that electricity. I've also sailed a fair amount with sheet to tiller arrangements, which work to varying degrees, but I think of this as more of a back-up plan if my windvane breaks.

I like having my systems as simple and as manual as possible, with back-ups and spares. My boat is rigged with an inner forestay and running back-stays to add extra sail arrangements and mast support if needed. New oversized rigging. I have a GPS unit and a chartplotter, depthsounder, VHF (with DSC interfaced with both GPS units) and lighting (interior, deck level nav., masthead nav., spreader work light, steaming) for my electrical draws, which I think is fairly modest. One 60W solar panel and four 6v batteries keep up with all this fine. I also have manual charts and all the tools and use them. Manual lavac head. Alcohol stove. Lots of anchoring gear. No refridgerator. No internal engine; I have a small 6hp outboard (two tanks, two fuel lines) for docking and getting home without any wind. It seems like a lot of people spend A LOT of time and money on their engines and maintenence. Jordan drogue. Life raft. And lots of other stuff.

Most importantly, I get out there and sail as much as the short Maine season will allow. I love to read and plan but I'm a 'hands-on' kinda guy and getting out on the water in my boat is the best way to apply what I've learned and improve my skills.

Congratulations of your most recent passage, Vega, and thanks for letting me know that my modest boat and approach to outfitting isn't unseaworthy or dated.
SS,
Couple of points. While a handheld GPS may well be free of the boats electrical system be aware that the damn things chew up batteries like nobodies business. We have an extension lead to a cigarette lighter socket for ours and it's something I'd recommend. Ours is an old Garmin 72 and maybe the newer models are more efficient in power use but we do seem to go through an awful lot of batteries unless we plug it in. We do have an installed unit as well but rarely use it while coastal. It's a handy thing to have at chart table and easier to read than a handheld.

Windvanes do seem to be the most logical self steering gear. While we don't have one on Raven I'd definitely install one if we going off cruising in her. Autopilots are good when you have little or no wind and/or under power but the noise is a nuisance no doubt as is the power consumption. We are lucky in that Raven will steer herself quite happily with just an octupus strap on the wheel provided of course the sail trim is just right. I'm told , but have no experience in the matter, that windvanes are problematic on a centre cockpit vessel, but I believe this is to do with the mess of lines having to come over the aft cabin and access to the gear itself.

Raven does have an inboard diesel and I'd not change that for quids. Utterly reliable, cheap to run and quite frankly maintenance costs are not a big issue. One thing I like about the smaller boat is the smaller engine and our Bukh 24hp is about as big as you can go and still hand start easily.

I don't understand anyone having an alcohol stove. Both my keelboats had them when purchased and I do not regret one iota dispensing with the damn things. Give me gas anyday. Our system is simple but effective. We have a pressure gauge on the gas line which is an instant indicator of a leak and no solonoid. Ok so that means climbing out to turn off the gas when you finish cooking but for me that's no big deal.

One question I have however and this is for anyone with an under 35'er. Where do you stow your dinghy ? On our PB (28') we had a glass thing that was lashed to the foredeck where it was an absolute pain in the butt. Unfortunately she didn't have any storage compartments large enough for an inflatable so when we eventually acquired one it had to either live again lashed to the foredeck or it moved between the foward cabin and the aft quarterberth. It annoyed the hell out of me and having a cockpit locker on Raven (34') that is big enough for an infatable is an absolute boon.
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  #55  
Old 02-11-2008
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When I'm in situations where I don't want my dink on the davits, I put it on the foredeck. Transom over the forward hatch, in front of the dorade boxes, then lashed down using the slotted toe rail. Weight and length being the main reasons for going with the Walker Bay 8. It fits quite nicely and still leaves enough room to go forward (though not much), if necessary.
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  #56  
Old 02-11-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PBzeer View Post
When I'm in situations where I don't want my dink on the davits, I put it on the foredeck. Transom over the forward hatch, in front of the dorade boxes, then lashed down using the slotted toe rail. Weight and length being the main reasons for going with the Walker Bay 8. It fits quite nicely and still leaves enough room to go forward (though not much), if necessary.
PB,
That's what we used to do before we went inflatable. On the PB that left less than enough room on the foredeck on Raven just enough room. Either or it's not a situation I'm all that happy with. Furler does mean that there is less reason to go forward but I'm not all that happy clambering over a dink to get to e.g the anchor.
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  #57  
Old 02-11-2008
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Wombat,

While it is true that a hendheld GPS will use up batteries, Why would you leave it on at sea? Once the position is checked, it takes about three minutes, turn it off. We checked our position no more than three times a day crossing the pacific and only had the gps on for more than a few minutes at a time while approaching Cape Flattery. Our primary unit is a Garmin GPS 76. We changed the batteries twice in 55 days and put in fresh as we entered the Strait of juan de Fuca because of the fog. As my flight instructor admonished me: "Don't stare at the instruments, look where you're going!"

Windvanes: Depends on the boat. We decided we don't need one because Lealea proved that she will hold a course for days at a time without attention, as you mentioned, given proper sail trim and a shock cord on the tiller.

Alcohol cooker: To each his own. Laura does most of the cooking and she likes the simple little two burner Origo we have. I can tell you I haven't suffered from lack of tasty meals either

Dingy: Yep, its a problem all right

Malie ke kai
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  #58  
Old 02-11-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vega1860 View Post
Wombat,

While it is true that a hendheld GPS will use up batteries, Why would you leave it on at sea? Once the position is checked, it takes about three minutes, turn it off. We checked our position no more than three times a day crossing the pacific and only had the gps on for more than a few minutes at a time while approaching Cape Flattery. Our primary unit is a Garmin GPS 76. We changed the batteries twice in 55 days and put in fresh as we entered the Strait of juan de Fuca because of the fog. As my flight instructor admonished me: "Don't stare at the instruments, look where you're going!"


Malie ke kai
Answer to your question is that our log is shot and I use the handheld instead. Need to replace the log but it's a match for the depth sounder and I'm kind of waiting for the depth sounder to die as well so that I have an excuse to replace them both. They are old Navico, long discontinued and no longer supported since the takeover (by Simrad I think it was).
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  #59  
Old 02-11-2008
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Vega, I like the idea of amsteel for standing rigging replacement. How do you plan on getting enough tension on it if you had to rig it up? Do you really sail everywhere with sheet to tiller set-up? That's AWESOME!!!
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  #60  
Old 02-11-2008
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Vega

Quote: As my flight instructor admonished me: "Don't stare at the instruments, look where you're going!"

Unless your IFR...then you better be staring at thoes intruments!!! Ive owned two planes...

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Quote: Vega, I like the idea of amsteel for standing rigging replacement.

I dont.. whats wrong with the real thing...and stay locks are fast and easy and you already have them?? If you have a hanked on jib I doubt it will last very long...

Last edited by Stillraining; 02-11-2008 at 10:26 PM.
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