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post #31 of 65 Old 03-11-2008
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nylon has a 15-18% stretch.

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post #32 of 65 Old 03-11-2008
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The construction of the line will affect the stretch but you can figure on nylon stretching 33% for a working load and at 40% you're at it's breaking strength in a laid or twisted line. By working load I mean the strain you can exert repeatedly and have it return to it's original length.

Dacron, or polyester line, has better abrasion resistance than nylon and it has about 80% of it's strength but it only stretches a little more than half what nylon does. For about 90% of what you do at sea those are desirable characteristics but not in a rode.

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post #33 of 65 Old 06-08-2008
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Spectra Jordan Series Drogues

Ace Sailmakers has been producing Spectra Jordan Series Drogues.
Our first Spectra version was for Mr. Dashew's powerboat.
250, two hundred fifty cones on 490' of rode, of which 75' is an integral "leader".

We have built perhaps 15 since then in Spectra. Latest ones for vessels over 40,000 loaded feature tapered ropes, the last section typically 3/8".

A recent Spectra drogue for a 48,000 loaded monohull, with Spectra bridle legs, weighed 29 lbs without weight for end. The nylon version
would have been over 80 lbs.

Lighter, more compact, easier to deploy, a bit easier to recover, more $.


Don is 92 and still working on patent pending inventions. One of which is a wingmast like spar for the headstay. He has built a model for my J-27.


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post #34 of 65 Old 06-08-2008
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Thanks for the feedback from a fabricator's point of view. I think the concept is very solid if you are, as has been pointed out, actively helming on a run in Greybeard City and want to stay at or below hull speed to avoid a potential broach or worse, a pitch-pole.

Heaving to is a form of "retiring" in the sense that you do everything possible to let the seas and the boat co-operate...to a point. That point is probably where a sea anchor comes in.

What I'm getting at is that it's not an either/or: I can see good reasons to carry both devices, particularly in world cruising, where you never have just one anchor type or one way to make electricity.
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post #35 of 65 Old 06-09-2008
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You made my JSD for me two years ago...

The only question I'd have with a Spectra JSD is the loss of the stretch in the JSD and how it affects performance of the drogue.

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post #36 of 65 Old 06-09-2008
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Interesting point. I gather just the line and bridle itself is Spectra and the drogues are still nylon cones?

Could not the bridle be nylon for stretch and the main drogue line be Spectra for strength? This is similar to the idea of a nylon snubber line for a chain rode.
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post #37 of 65 Old 06-09-2008
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After seeing this topic crop up multiple times on this forum, and doing my own research, the Jordan Series Drogue seems to me like the end-all-be-all coolest safety gear that an ocean cruiser can have. Based on the literature, I might even prioritize it over an EPIRB. The thing looks friggin cool.

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post #38 of 65 Old 06-09-2008
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They are pretty cool...but be aware, they are a royal PITA to retrieve.

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Originally Posted by beej67 View Post
After seeing this topic crop up multiple times on this forum, and doing my own research, the Jordan Series Drogue seems to me like the end-all-be-all coolest safety gear that an ocean cruiser can have. Based on the literature, I might even prioritize it over an EPIRB. The thing looks friggin cool.

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post #39 of 65 Old 06-10-2008
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I read somewhere about rigging a block to your bow, and using a line a little over twice the length of your boat, run from an aft winch through the block, back down to the drogue. Pull it up one boat length at a time.

Yeah, does sound like a major pita, but I'd bet it'd be worth it if I was in the !@#$ so much I felt I needed to deploy it.

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Beej-

LOL... You're probably referring to my description of the retrieval process I use, which I posted on Sailnet a while back.

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I read somewhere about rigging a block to your bow, and using a line a little over twice the length of your boat, run from an aft winch through the block, back down to the drogue. Pull it up one boat length at a time.

Yeah, does sound like a major pita, but I'd bet it'd be worth it if I was in the !@#$ so much I felt I needed to deploy it.

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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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