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-   -   seriesdrogue or sea anchor (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/cruising-liveaboard-forum/40757-seriesdrogue-sea-anchor.html)

seajoy 02-20-2008 05:05 PM

seriesdrogue or sea anchor
 
we have a 46 foot catamaran and are not sure what to buy. any recomendations and pros and cons ?

sailingdog 02-20-2008 08:25 PM

I think a Jordan Series Drogue is a better investment than a sea anchor. It will put less strain on the boat, and is probably one of the best pieces of safety gear for a small sailing craft...and 46' is still pretty small.

If you haven't read up on the Jordan Series Drogue, I'd recommend you go to the website, www.jordanseriesdrogue.com and take a look around.

billyruffn 02-20-2008 08:44 PM

I think they serve somewhat different functions. A drogue, deployed from the stern, is intended to slow a boat while sailing/running downwind and to prevent a broach / roll situation from developing when a large following sea engulfs the boat. A parachute 'anchor', deployed from the bow, is more of a way to "stop" the boat at sea during a storm. The Pardeys have written quite a bit on the subject. Their strategy in the use of the para-anchor involves heaving to, deploying the para-anchor, and then letting the boat drift very slowly downwind and, in the process, creating a 'slick' to windward of the boat that disturbs the surface tension of the water and inhibits the wave from breaking over the boat. The para-anchor is probably much harder to deploy and recover, but set correctly, it apparently allows you to retire below and get some rest. With a drogue deployed I think the boat has to be actively helmed.

I have a sea anchor and hope never to use it! I also have a drogue. Ditto.

camaraderie 02-20-2008 08:58 PM

Dawg...how does a multihull heave to? I don't mean technically...how well does it work without the same keel/rudder fources that a monohull has? Is lack of heaving to ability and resulting high stress on the boat via the sea anchor the the reason for your recommendation of drogue vs. sea anchor for a cat?

sailingdog 02-20-2008 09:24 PM

Billy-

The Jordan Series Drogue was designed to be a deploy and hunker down storm device for surviving the worst the sea can throw at you. Don Jordan, when I spoke with him prior to getting my JSD, compared it to an ejection seat on a plane, where you pulled the handle and then let it take over. Then, when the seas have calmed down... you haul the JSD back aboard and go on your way.

Cam-

Multihulls can heave to much like any sailboat. However, most multihulls are far safer if they retract their centerboards/daggerboards, since their ability to slip often helps prevent them from capsizing. The real problems with a parachute-type sea anchor apply to both multihulls and monohulls IMHO.

The problem with a sea anchor is that if it is properly sized, it will effectively stop the boat almost dead in the water—like an anchor would. The forces on the attachment points are incredibly high, much higher than those experienced by a Jordan Series Drogue, and few boats have hardpoints that are sufficient to the task.

Also, the way a parachute sea anchor loads up, is very different from that of a JSD. The parachute will suddenly fill and put a very high shock load on the boat and gear. Unlike a parachute-type sea anchor, a series drogue loads up gradually, as the boat moves forward on the wave crest and the drogue line straightens out.

The Series drogue is designed to slow a boat down to a very slow speed, and prevent the storm's forces from capsizing or damaging the boat. Since the boat is still moving, the waves, even breaking ones, don't get a chance to clobber the boat. Tests and real world experience has shown that the JSD will pull a boat through a breaking wave and prevent the wave from capsizing the boat. The boats generally don't even get pooped seriously, since the boat and the waves are moving at relatively close speeds.

Because of the design, a JSD can't collapse if the wave hits it wrong, like a parachute can. It also doesn't have to be a specific distance from boat like a parachute sea anchor does, simplifying its deployment.

Finally, the amount of rode you need for a parachute-type sea anchor is often bulkier than the JSD for the same size boat would be.

I hope this helps Cam.

billyruffn 02-20-2008 09:38 PM

Dog, Nothing wrong with an ejection seat when the world turns to s***.

sailingdog 02-20-2008 09:51 PM

Yup...that's how I feel too...so I got a JSD for my boat. :)
Quote:

Originally Posted by billyruffn (Post 269386)
Dog, Nothing wrong with an ejection seat when the world turns to s***.


seajoy 02-20-2008 10:21 PM

Gentleman
Thank you verry much for your comments. i understand that the JSD will slow me down but what are we doing if we have wind and breakers ahead of us.
According to the posted i will order a JSD if i can find the right size for a 46 foot catamaran

sailingdog 02-20-2008 10:24 PM

If you're in a lee shore situation, neither a parachute sea anchor or a Jordan Series Drogue is going to be the appropriate storm technique to be using.

You can get sizing info for a Jordan Series Drogue here. The sizing of the drogues is by displacement. What does your 46' catamaran displace???

Quote:

Originally Posted by seajoy (Post 269410)
Gentleman
Thank you verry much for your comments. i understand that the JSD will slow me down but what are we doing if we have wind and breakers ahead of us.
According to the posted i will order a JSD if i can find the right size for a 46 foot catamaran


seajoy 02-20-2008 10:38 PM

SD thanks
displacement is 25000 lbs and not listed on their website


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