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  #11  
Old 03-13-2008
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A used delta is better IMHO than a new claw...especially since they discontinued the genuine Bruce anchors.

The plugs should be kept in a plastic bag, since they really need to stay DRY. The plugs are made of softwood, which swells when they get wet...if they're already wet...they may not swell enough to hold themselves in position properly.

As for the pump in the cabin... what if you have to heave-to or hide in the cabin due to the weather... and you have a leak or water getting in via the companionway... how do you clear it if your batteries are dead.

As for rigging the engine to pump water out...bad idea unless you have no other options... if debris in the bilge gets into the cooling system, it may clog it and prevent you from using the engine again... meaning that you'll lose electricity, the ability to motor and all of your non-manual bilge pumps. Not exactly what you want—which is why I think a manual bilge pump in the cabin is a very good idea.

As for the bucket, that requires you to have the companionway or another hatch open, so you can dump the bucket out... in a bad storm, you really want to have the hatches and companionway dogged shut. A properly rigged manual bilge pump doesn't require you to open up the cabin.
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Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

óCpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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Last edited by sailingdog; 03-13-2008 at 11:03 PM.
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  #12  
Old 03-13-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
A used delta is better IMHO than a new claw......................
The plugs should be kept in a plastic bag,

As for the pump in the cabin... .....

As for rigging the engine to pump water out....
What is a deal with a claw? They are cheap even new. All reviews I could find are very favorable. Is there something nobody telling but I should be aware of?

You point about soft wood is taken seriously. Iíll put every plug into separate zip lock bag,

I kinda agree with all your points about manual pump. However I set for coastal cruising within of a range of USCG weather stations. I have classic boat (At least underwater) with deep bulge, I hope, I can survive it the way it is right now.

An engine has a strainer. My contingency plan was to disconnect water intake prior to strainer, so there is no damage to engineÖ.I hope Iíll never get to this point anyway.


Do you have latest Telstar? How do you like it? Do you have that ingenious mechanism to raise a mast?

CR
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  #13  
Old 03-14-2008
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Yes, they review favorably, but in reality, they don't have much holding power, can't really reset and aren't really all that good IMHO, especially compared to the Delta, Rocna and Manson Supreme.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CrazyRu View Post
What is a deal with a claw? They are cheap even new. All reviews I could find are very favorable. Is there something nobody telling but I should be aware of?
Most people never think that they might be stuck in the cabin and needing to pump water out of the boat, and while keeping the boat closed up to prevent even more from coming in.

Quote:
I kinda agree with all your points about manual pump. However I set for coastal cruising within of a range of USCG weather stations. I have classic boat (At least underwater) with deep bulge, I hope, I can survive it the way it is right now.
Yes, but fine debris might still make it past the raw water strainer and damage the impeller... sand, metal shavings, etc... may be sitting in your bilge, waiting to get sucked up by the engine.

Quote:
An engine has a strainer. My contingency plan was to disconnect water intake prior to strainer, so there is no damage to engine….I hope I’ll never get to this point anyway.
Yes, I have a Telstar 28... there were two other models, the Telstar 26 and the Telstar 35, both of which were built in England.

The mast raising system is really great and allows me to step or unstep the mast using a single control line. Even better, I can do it on the water or on the trailer, since it used the genoa sheet winch to do it. The best part is that I can stop the mast anywhere between fully up or fully down, by simply cleating off the line, and then continue or reverse the process as needed—all without any outside assistance.

Quote:
Do you have latest Telstar? How do you like it? Do you have that ingenious mechanism to raise a mast?

CR
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Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

óCpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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Last edited by sailingdog; 03-14-2008 at 12:14 AM.
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  #14  
Old 03-14-2008
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Quote:
I have three anchors, two oversized, however all three are danforth type. My primary is Fortress FX16 Ė one size bigger than necessary. I have no problem with it, except for setting. It takes awhile normally. I have another steel one which is huge and heavy. I have never used it yet. Itís in my cockpit locker, rigged and ready to go overboard. Iím not sure Iíll be able to pull it back
If you have trouble setting a danforth you will hate a plow or claw anchor.

Quote:
The problem with Danforth-type anchors, including the Fortress, is that they have a lot of trouble resetting in a reversing current or changing wind situation. BTW, 12' of chain may be a problem for the Fortress, since they say something about having very limited amounts of chain on their anchors or they may not set properly.
I have to disagree with you here Dog. We have a fortress on all chain rode. It has held us in every condition. Including reversing currents.
they may not be the best for every type of bottom but for mud and sand they have worked good for me. We have no trouble setting it it sets very fast compared to a claw or plow. The disadvatage of danforthes is they don't lay right on most rollers and they stick out on the sides.
Oh my god I'm getting in an anchor thread
Gotta go bye you never saw me
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  #15  
Old 03-14-2008
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Soul searcher-

Be that as it may, you may be just very lucky, since Fortress does not recommend that you use an all-chain rode...

The next generation anchors, like the Rocna and Manson Supreme, tend to set very quickly compared to older designs. This past summer, I nearly dumped my bowman in the water when backing down to set the Rocna.
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Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

óCpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

StillóDON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
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  #16  
Old 03-14-2008
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Great info re your route

There is a set of books, which I understand are excellent. I believe there are two of them, both called "Managing the Waterway." One is Hampton Roads to Biscayne Bay, and I beleive there is a second one from Houston to Biscayne Bay. I hear about them on furledsails dot com (I cannot put in the full web address because I haven't posted 10 times) which is a wonderful sailing podcast weekly. Go to the furled sails site (above) look in the list of archived podcasts for Managing the Waterway, an interview with Mark and Diana Doyle, and listen to it. You can then decide whether it would be worth it. But they have the name, location, depths, of (and I quote) 349 marina facilities, 283 anchorages, 443 waypoints, 192 marina stores, plus up to date bridge schedules, 200 photos, 1200 websites and phone numbers. I think it is just the thing for being able to find places to duck in, cheap help, etc. it is about 25$.

Good luck, sounds like fun. And yes, a self steerer, even if it is a shock cord to the tiller, is a great idea. It changes the world. Stay tethered.

Mike Graham
Bali Hai, Pearson 10M, Hull 14
(owned and sailed for 33 years, same boat)
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  #17  
Old 03-28-2008
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Why is waterway?

Quote:
Originally Posted by PBzeer View Post
I'd suggest you plan on going through Louisiana on the Waterway. You can go from Galveston to either the Sabine or Calcieseu River (I'd suggest the second), then on the Waterway until past New Orleans. From there, you can coastal hop your way to the Bueafort Inlet in NC.
PBzeer, why is not to stay on outside? Mississippi delta has drawn my attention since I was a kid and lived many thousands miles away.

I have wild idea of staying on outside until Tiger pass. Tiger pass is well marked most westward recreational vessels channel into Venice LA (Located on main river ) There were reports about hurricanes disruption, however latest reports from web shows that navigation aids fully restored and functional. And then take Baptiste Collette Bayou to east. Is there anything wrong with this idea?

Thanks to everybody for help, every advice is well taken.

Iím getting close to leave.
CR
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  #18  
Old 03-28-2008
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Having gone all around the Gulf both up and down the ditch all the way and offshore all the way. I would do one or the other - from offshore, you cannot rely on getting into an inlet every night and you will waste an inordinate amount of time doing that.
If you can find someone to go with you, go offshore and sail 24/7 - do not try to "anchor" offshore.
If not, go up the ditch and enjoy the scenery. The prevailing wind is South to Southeast, so if you only travel during daylight so you can see where you are going, you can sail much of the intercoastal on a broad reach.
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Old 03-28-2008
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If I were you, I would check on crossing FL through the Okeechobee canal (if it is indeed still passable this summer) From the Fort Pierce or the St Lucie Inlets you can get a good weather window and catch the Gulf Steam to help you make it in one day to Cape Canaveral. The it is a 147 km overnight to St Mary's Inlet and from there another 115 miles overnight to Port Royal or St Helena Sound. Then an easy day to Charleston. From Charleston, you can poke your head outside again to the Waccamaw River and then to Cape Fear. Or Morehead City.

I would agree with the others on your anchor; however, my choice would be the SPADE. I have found it to be SUPERB in all conditions. Once past St Mary's inlet you will be inside the stream and will be able to heave-too for a few hours sleep. However who ever said you should think about taking a friend with you is right. That is not to say you can't do it buy yourself but a crew would make it easier.
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Old 03-28-2008
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If you only draw 3 feet, you have lots of options. If you (and your old diesel) prefer to sail, and Galveston to Key West is too long a leg (which it probably is) then your Tiger Pass/Baptiste Colette idea as a stopover isn't bad (but watch for the oil platforms, they're all around). Check with the Venice Marina in advance to make sure they're open for you. This stop will involve some motoring.

Then, if you don't want to head straight for Key West, head east to Panama City or Apalachicola, then Tampa or Fort Myers (if you're aren't taking the cross-Florida canal), then Key West (there aren't any good harbors between these last two).

Then it's your choice, take the ICW during poor weather, and go outside during good weather.

Good luck. Sounds like you're a good planner, and you're asking the right questions.

Late April, May or June would be a good time in the Gulf. Not hurricane season yet, and good southerlies for reaching when going east (but slow when you have to go south along western Florida) but you may still get a few northerlies through May at least. But prevailing winds in warm weather are from the south or the east.
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