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Go Back   SailNet Community > Out There > Cruising & Liveaboard Forum
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  #1  
Old 08-04-2002
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Water.

Hello. We''re planning on a nice long cruise on our Tartan T30, and I''m curious to know how much water 2 adults use on an average day in the warmer climates. I plan on putting in a watermaker when I deal with the plumbing. That''s my next project, just before the rigging. Ack. But not sure if I should really add to the tankage that''s there. As of now it holds 40 gallons. There''ll be some open water.
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Old 08-06-2002
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Water.

I''m surprised you don''t have a reply by now from someone with extensive experience.

All I can tell you is that we averaged 2.5 US gallons per person for 10 days in the tropics, taking most showers on board, but not doing any laundry. It also does not include ice bought for beverages.

I have read that you can conserve fairly readily down to 1.5 gallons per day per person. Less than that and you are really rationing carefully. Keep in mind that you need to keep your body properly hydrated in hot climes.

This is just one answer; let''s hear some more.

Duane
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Old 08-07-2002
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Water.

Heruka:

You don''t mention if the 40 gallons of existing tankage is in multiple tanks or in only one (I assume it''s the latter) nor do you state how many jugs of water you plan to take, in addition. Multiple storage containers in case of contamination e.g. in the main tank would be my main concern.

A watermaker is a wonderful thing but a) may malfunction, and b) the boat may not be in places where you can run it even tho'' your onboard supply is low. I''m amazed at how often I''ve heard fellow cruisers tell me their ''membrane seal failed'' or some other issue put their watermaker out of service.

You''ll need the amount of water you take, and you''ll use what you have. (Sorry for that sounding flip, but it''s true...). It''s just like ''how big should our cruising budget be?'' You''ll spend what you have and, since everyone has a unique amount, there are no hard/fast rules on what''s needed.

You might find it helpful to refer to John Neal''s/Barbara Marrett''s MAHINA TIARE, Pacific Passages book. They did extended cruising on a boat of your size & tankage. You''ll find John''s comments on issues like water - in an Appendix at the back - to be instructive.

Finally, to illustrate the ''what you have is what you''ll use'' concept, there are many techniques some cruisers use in lieu of spending the money and giving up the space required by adding tankage and/or a watermaker. On our last boat (family of 3, cruising in remote islands with no water supply ashore, and with a 50 gal main tank plus 2 jugs), we used salt water for all dish washing (when it was clean enough) and a plant spritzer to ''rinse'' all the glasses, dishes, etc. Removed the salt taste & build-up and used almost no water. These and many other techniques are available just by bumming around the anchorage and asking smaller boats what they''re doing...and you''ll meet neat people, too.

Good luck on the prep; and good for you, replacing that old wire before heading out!

Jack
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Old 08-08-2002
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Water.

Our crew of four, two adults and two pre-teens, go through one 5 gallon jerry can a day for cooking, drinking and minor wash-ups. Our 60 gallons on on-board tankage lasts a week for washing dishes, rinsing down the dog, and showering (note: use a metered system like the H2O bags-not using the shower).

Don
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Old 08-08-2002
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Heruka is on a distinguished road
Water.

Thanks for the info. I''ll definately pack some fexible water tanks. And fill them up for the long hulls.
Sadly, the only affodable watermkers are the ones that I''ve heard associated with the seal problems.
I''ll have to look up that book. I enjoy things geared towards small boat cruising. Most everything out there seems to be about larger cruising yachts.
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Old 08-11-2002
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Water.

Heruka:

One follow-up: Since you mentioned you were looking for practical writings on smaller cruising boats & their techniques, I''d actually suggest you look at two books: both the MAHINA TIARE book I mentioned before and LOG OF THE MAHINA, also by John Neal, can be purchased very inexpensively, "used" (but in like-new shape), at amazon.com. MT was a Hallberg-Rassy 30'' sloop, while MAHINA - John''s first boat, which he sailed across the Pacific and back to the U.S. - was a 27'' Vega. Both boats were simply equipped by today''s standards; both boats had limited water tankage. And both books offer appendicies with practical discussion of how he set the boats up for offshore cruising while on a tight budget.

Good luck!

Jack
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Old 10-01-2002
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Water.

You might look up Aqua Marine from either Washington or Oregon. We purchased an engine-driven-24 gph water maker for about $3,000.00. Excellent price if you are handy with doing your own installation. Good luck.
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