Sailing experience first time out - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > Out There > Cruising & Liveaboard Forum
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 09-24-2008
Barquito's Avatar
Barquito
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 2,070
Thanks: 0
Thanked 18 Times in 18 Posts
Rep Power: 8
Barquito is on a distinguished road
Sailing experience first time out

Here is a question for those of you who have been 'out there'. What do you think is the typical experience level and knowledge of most sailors making his or her first big ocean passage? I know there are a few people who buy a boat and learn as they go. This (I would hope) is the minority. I am not interested in what people should do, but, what experience most actually have.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 09-24-2008
camaraderie's Avatar
moderate?
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: East Coast
Posts: 13,877
Thanks: 0
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Rep Power: 15
camaraderie is a jewel in the rough camaraderie is a jewel in the rough camaraderie is a jewel in the rough
I think that probably more than 90% of sailors never make an ocean passage. I had sailed for about 20 years before I made my first real offshore passage but I probably had the same years experience twenty times! Not quite...but you get the point. I think a couple of years of active sailing while reading everything you can about prep and passagemaking and getting the boat ready is probably sufficient for most to make a safe initial passage if you are so motivated.
__________________
No longer posting. Reach me by PM!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 09-25-2008
Omatako's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Auckland New Zealand
Posts: 2,448
Thanks: 0
Thanked 30 Times in 27 Posts
Rep Power: 12
Omatako will become famous soon enough
As Cam said, 90% never go to sea.

Many get marooned on the Teak Reef. Looks like this and is found in most yacht clubs around the world.



There is a wealth of sea-going stories to be heard around these reefs and most of them are about as genuine as the desire of the speaker to really go sailing.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

__________________

"Two possibilities exist: Either we are alone in the Universe or we are not. Both are equally terrifying."

Arthur C. Clarke
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 09-26-2008
vega1860's Avatar
Swab
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: At Sea
Posts: 736
Thanks: 0
Thanked 18 Times in 16 Posts
Rep Power: 9
vega1860 is on a distinguished road
Of course everyone's experience is different

I had my boat for nine years before my first ocean crossing, from Vancouver, BC to Kailua-Kona on a square rigged sail training ship. We did it to find out what it would be like to be at sea for weeks at a time. Quite a difference from afternoons on the bay. We decided we liked it and began taking trips that took us out of sight of land for a day or two. Laura signed on as delivery crew on a schooner from San Diego to Kauai to get a bit more experience (23 days as it turned out).

After a few island hops in Hawaii we figured we were ready for some serious voyaging. We like it even more now that we measure our sea time in months. I recommend working up to it gradually. We were lucky, living in Hawaii and having the option of sailing to another island overnight but you can just sail away from land for twelve hours or a day or so then turn around and sail back. In my opinion, hugging the coast and staying in sight of land is not a good idea if you want to get a taste of deep water cruising. We've run into lots of people who dreamed of sailing to faraway exotic locations only to find that they failed to consider the reality of being at sea for extended periods.

What I'm getting at is that you don't need years of sailing experience. You need basic sailing skills, of course, but, more importantly, you need to understand what it's like to stand watches and work your ship toward its destination, day and night, watch and watch. If you and your crew have the discipline and attitude blue water voyaging demands you will enjoy it. If not, no amount of day-sailing will prepare you.

Visit our web sight for more.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Last edited by vega1860; 09-26-2008 at 06:46 PM.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 09-26-2008
uspirate's Avatar
Trim for Sail
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: 36 07 27.69 N 115 10 14.2 W
Posts: 2,148
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 16
uspirate has a spectacular aura about uspirate has a spectacular aura about uspirate has a spectacular aura about
here here for vega1860's post!
__________________
To get the most from Sailnet, read the link in
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
signature

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Sin City, Liquor all day, Poker all night...Channel Islands & Diego, So Cal
BJ & Nimfa
S/V Flocerfida


If You dont Stand Behind our troops...Feel Free To STAND IN FRONT OF THEM

Last edited by uspirate; 09-26-2008 at 07:44 PM.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 09-26-2008
uspirate's Avatar
Trim for Sail
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: 36 07 27.69 N 115 10 14.2 W
Posts: 2,148
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 16
uspirate has a spectacular aura about uspirate has a spectacular aura about uspirate has a spectacular aura about
Quote:
Originally Posted by Omatako View Post
As Cam said, 90% never go to sea.

Many get marooned on the Teak Reef. Looks like this and is found in most yacht clubs around the world.



There is a wealth of sea-going stories to be heard around these reefs and most of them are about as genuine as the desire of the speaker to really go sailing.
Thats what that damn reef looks like? i've been stuck on it many times.
__________________
To get the most from Sailnet, read the link in
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
signature

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Sin City, Liquor all day, Poker all night...Channel Islands & Diego, So Cal
BJ & Nimfa
S/V Flocerfida


If You dont Stand Behind our troops...Feel Free To STAND IN FRONT OF THEM
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 09-26-2008
Faster's Avatar
Just another Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: New Westminster, BC
Posts: 15,319
Thanks: 88
Thanked 241 Times in 232 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Faster has a spectacular aura about Faster has a spectacular aura about Faster has a spectacular aura about
I'd agree with Vega, there's nothing in coastal sailing (other than simple boat handling and familiarity) that compares to actually leaving the land behind and out of sight.
First time out you'll be amazed how difficult it will be to get a good bit of sleep, how fatigued you will become (in short order) and how that affects your judgement, perceptions and your whole attitude about the experience.

Once you work through all that and get into a bit of a rhythm (if indeed you do) then you'll have a better idea of whether or not this is for you.

Overnight or 2-3 day offshore jaunts would be an excellent way to check things out and still have a fairly easy escape route back.

Coastal hops are another way to get a taste of "blue water" but that too has it's downside.. Lee shore, possible increased risk of shipping traffic, and on the West coast, few harbours that are usable in bad weather.

Having a boat you have full and complete faith in is another huge factor, especially when you first run into some nasty weather. Dealing with your own reactions is plenty, constantly worrying about how the boat will deal with things will overload you quickly.

So I think you need to be a competent confident sailor, know your boat (and that it's capable), and have done your research on routing and navigation. Then have plenty of time (no short term deadlines if possible) and give it a go.
__________________
Ron

1984 Fast/Nicholson 345 "FastForward"

".. there is much you could do at sea with common sense.. and very little you could do without it.."
Capt G E Ericson (from "The Cruel Sea" by Nicholas Monsarrat)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 09-28-2008
bobwebster's Avatar
vagrant
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Pryor
Posts: 115
Thanks: 0
Thanked 5 Times in 1 Post
Rep Power: 10
bobwebster is on a distinguished road
I had my first boat 7 months before crossing the Atlantic in it, a Bahia 46. 4 days sailing experience before that. Here's the blog and info:

The Babelfish, a Sailing Catamaran
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 09-28-2008
speciald's Avatar
Special Delivery
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: live on boat
Posts: 661
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
speciald is on a distinguished road
Send a message via Skype™ to speciald
We worked our way up to it. Coastal day passages, then overnights, then multi-overnights, then an 800 mile coastal passage up to 100 miles offshore, then 1300 miles to the caribbean. It was a matter of getting comfortable and gaining confidence with ourselves and the boat. Next?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #10  
Old 09-28-2008
LynW's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Liveaboard
Posts: 67
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
LynW is on a distinguished road
I did two ocean passages as crew before taking my own boat. I can really recommend that.

Ocean sailing is a little different from coastal and needs more careful preparation, but with GPS isn't any more difficult. A couple of seasons of coastal sailing working up to some overnight passages should be plenty enough experience.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Estimating Project Time Don Casey Her Sailnet Articles 0 09-23-2004 09:00 PM
How Other Sailors Learned Mark Matthews Learning to Sail Articles 0 08-31-2001 09:00 PM
Time and the Evolution of Longitude Jim Sexton Learning to Sail Articles 0 02-24-2001 08:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:51 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.