Dinghys and where to put them? - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > Out There > Cruising & Liveaboard Forum
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 10-15-2008
Duckwheat's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Ballard, WA/McCall,ID
Posts: 59
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
Duckwheat is on a distinguished road
Dinghys and where to put them?

I got a couple of questions for off shore sailors.

I have seen the dinghy(D) hanging from arches from the rear of the boat. Some without motors, and some with.

How much wind is that D going to catch?

Is it realistic to keep the motor on the D?

Put the motor on the rail?

In another post I read where someone was told they had a 2 year D vs what a real cruisers buy which is a quality D that will last indefinitely.

What are some of the quality D?

Inflatable vs Solid Design?

I have seen some fiberglass cats, any opinions?

Thanks for your thoughts.

DW
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 10-16-2008
Valiente's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Toronto
Posts: 5,491
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Valiente has a spectacular aura about Valiente has a spectacular aura about
Offshore? Hell, in Lake Ontario in five foot seas, I had a davit crack with a Zodiac 310 (10' 2") on the back. No engine.

After the Chinese fire drill wrapped up, I started my research. My conclusions? One 88 lb. nesting dinghy with oars/sail gear, and one 55 lb. 10 foot Portabote with 2 HP Honda (28 lbs.). Both on the foredeck.

My kid has his own "sailboat", and it's the "people mover" and the Portabote is for "cargo". I have versatility, capacity and a way to get separate trips done while at anchor.

What did I give up? The hassle of getting a 120 lb. RIB on deck that is a total wind scoop. The hassle of getting a 9.9 hp motor on and off its stern. The hassle of having the bloody pontoons ruin my forward view from the pilothouse.

RIBs are great for diving, hitting the softer sort of beach and going up windless rivers. But for our plans, they weren't ideal, and splitting one tender into two made sense.

Your mileage may vary.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 10-16-2008
camaraderie's Avatar
moderate?
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: East Coast
Posts: 13,877
Thanks: 0
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Rep Power: 15
camaraderie is a jewel in the rough camaraderie is a jewel in the rough camaraderie is a jewel in the rough
OK...you said offshore sailors so I will assume the questions do NOT pertain to Idaho!
1. It would catch a little wind but not much. Biggest danger is from waves and breaking seas and the forces exterted on the davit mounts.
2. The motor should never be left on. It is hung on the stern rail on a bracket.
3. Davits should NEVER be used at sea. The dinghy belongs on the foredeck tied down. Davits are used at anchor and on calm coastal sailing days.

A quality INFLATABLE dinghy will be well made by a recognized mfr. and use hypalon for resistance to the damage of the sun. Recognized quality brands include: Avon, Caribe, Zodiac, Achilles, Walker Bay, AB, and probably a few others I've failed to remember at the moment.
Beyond inflatable you also need to choose capacity, wood or aluminum floor, no floor, air floor or RIB and the size motor required for that dinghy and what you want to do with it.

Then there are hard dinghys, nesting dinghies and portaboats, kayaks etc. that serve as dinghies. I'll leave those to others as I am a confitmed RIB fan.
RIB= Rigid Inflatable Boat= fiberglass bottom and inflatable tubes.
They are much less tippy and hold more weight and stand up to groundings better especially in coral areas. They go fast too which is important when you travel long distances in them to fish or hit the reefs for some diving...or when there is a squall coming and you have just barely enough time to make it back to the boat!

The downside is that they are expensive and heavier than the pure inflatables and require enough room on deck to tore the rigid part and can't be rolled up an stashed for storage like other inflatables.
__________________
No longer posting. Reach me by PM!
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 10-16-2008
Omatako's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Auckland New Zealand
Posts: 2,412
Thanks: 0
Thanked 28 Times in 25 Posts
Rep Power: 12
Omatako will become famous soon enough
Yep, I'm with Cam. RIB for me and stowed on the foredeck while sailing.

We have a bigger than necessary RIB but find it useful when fetching water and fuel (heavy) and also as Cam says, when four of us want to go for a fish, the space is worth the hassle of managing a bigger boat.

I just wish I could find an outboard motor that will start to my schedule not to it's own :-(
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

__________________

"Two possibilities exist: Either we are alone in the Universe or we are not. Both are equally terrifying."

Arthur C. Clarke
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 10-16-2008
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
One other point to add to cam's good summary.

You should avoid tying things to the stanchions. I've seen kayaks and such tied to them, and it really isn't a wise idea. If you have water breaking over the deck, anything large, like a kayak, tied to the stanchions will help the wave rip the stanchions from the deck. If that happens you may end up with no lifelines and a large series of holes in the deck that are letting water down below in storm conditions...which you will not like.

Saw the results of having a kayak tied to the stanchions about 10 years ago when a sailboat limped into New Bedford Harbor with the lifelines and stanchions on one side missing and the crew and captain looked pretty beat up... and it had only happened on their last day at sea... I'd hate to think what they'd look like if it had happened in the middle of their passage up from Bermuda.
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 10-16-2008
Ilenart's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: West Australia
Posts: 508
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 8
Ilenart is on a distinguished road
I would also add Aquapro to Cam's list. The RIB's now have an aluminum hull which work fine.

Here is an interesting way to keep the RIB on davits, upside down. The guy had the fittings welded onto the bottom of the aluminum hull. Apparently the only problem is when dragging up the beach the fittings sometimes snag seaweed and other crap.

YouTube - The drogue saves the day

Ilenart
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 10-16-2008
speciald's Avatar
Special Delivery
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: live on boat
Posts: 661
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
speciald is on a distinguished road
Send a message via Skype™ to speciald
Off-shore - on deck, inverted, and strongly tied down or stowed below. Short trips - tow behind with or without motor like the charterers. At night - hoisted out of the water by halyard or davits to prevent theft. Dingy should never be carried on stern davits when on an offshore passage. Should a following sea poop the dinghy, the load on those davits may exceed their capacity.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 10-16-2008
cruising all I can
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 997
Thanks: 3
Thanked 20 Times in 15 Posts
Rep Power: 8
joethecobbler is on a distinguished road
I have a very large wide flat stern w/ a full width swim platform. It is nice when boarding from a dingy . when sailing I either tow it or stand it up on its stern on the swim platform. It seem to work out . it is a 8 1/2' hard dink.I keep the motor on the stern rail of the mainship.
we sailed from St. Pete,Fl. to upstate NY last year and it went well and was lot of fun.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 10-16-2008
Valiente's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Toronto
Posts: 5,491
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Valiente has a spectacular aura about Valiente has a spectacular aura about
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
One other point to add to cam's good summary.

You should avoid tying things to the stanchions.
This is good advice. I tend to forgot that having welded 1 1/2" Schedule 40 pipe for rails instead of lifelines allows me to do things that would be half arsed on the more typical boat.

I should have qualified this by saying that the Portabote would be laid down flat on deck at the first sign of weather. My foredeck is broad enough to do this and not have it restrict movement much.

In a perfect world, I would love to retube my Zodiac RIB in Hypalon (it's PVC and fading fast), but everything aboard is predicated on the strength and physics of my 110-lb. wife and young son being able to physically move everything aboard. Getting the RIB on and off the deck using a halyard (and over those high rails) simply didn't seem feasible for her to handle solo, whereas she can handle the other, lighter, less wind-catching tenders capably.

Moving a 9.9 HP out of the forepeak (I don't like them on the rail) would be even harder.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #10  
Old 10-16-2008
Stryker72's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 108
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
Stryker72 is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Valiente View Post
Offshore? Hell, in Lake Ontario in five foot seas, I had a davit crack with a Zodiac 310 (10' 2") on the back. No engine.

After the Chinese fire drill wrapped up, I started my research. My conclusions? One 88 lb. nesting dinghy with oars/sail gear, and one 55 lb. 10 foot Portabote with 2 HP Honda (28 lbs.). Both on the foredeck.

My kid has his own "sailboat", and it's the "people mover" and the Portabote is for "cargo". I have versatility, capacity and a way to get separate trips done while at anchor.

What did I give up? The hassle of getting a 120 lb. RIB on deck that is a total wind scoop. The hassle of getting a 9.9 hp motor on and off its stern. The hassle of having the bloody pontoons ruin my forward view from the pilothouse.

RIBs are great for diving, hitting the softer sort of beach and going up windless rivers. But for our plans, they weren't ideal, and splitting one tender into two made sense.

Your mileage may vary.
Val, What kind of nesting dinghy?

Last edited by Stryker72; 10-16-2008 at 02:54 PM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:48 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.