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Go Back   SailNet Community > Out There > Cruising & Liveaboard Forum
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  #11  
Old 11-24-2008
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Giulietta is just really nice Giulietta is just really nice Giulietta is just really nice Giulietta is just really nice Giulietta is just really nice
Chibb...I'll be waiting for you, then... CLICK HERE FOR MARINA DETAILS

When you're here, if you are not too tired of sailing...I'll let you have a go at 10 knots..OK??

Let me know when you're coming, OK?

Look for a boat called Giulietta, in cascais...easy to spot..ehehehe

Alex
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  #12  
Old 11-24-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chibb View Post
Our current speed plucked out of thin air for planning is 3.5 knots, which would give daily runs of 84 miles.
That sounds like a good conservative figure. If you get there faster, so be it.

Canaries to Brazil is a bit over 2,600NM, or a 31 day passage based on your stats. Sounds like fun!

Ilenart
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  #13  
Old 11-24-2008
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Your estimate seems reasonable

Quote:
Originally Posted by chibb View Post
Our current speed plucked out of thin air for planning is 3.5 knots, which would give daily runs of 84 miles.
With a 27 foot waterline I used 100 miles for planning purposes and generally did a bit better. I think your estimate makes sense. What you will actually do depends on factors like what wind belt you are in. In the trades on a broad reach you will do better, reliably day after day. In the Westerlies every day can be different. Another factor is how much you can/want to motor on windless days.

I think it is better to be conservative in your estimate than the reverse. If you get somewhere a bit early you have more time to explore. If your planning it so ambitious you will spend all your time playing catch-up and not enjoy it nearly as much.
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Old 11-24-2008
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I say 90 to 100 would be very good going
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  #15  
Old 11-25-2008
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Motoring will almost certainly be out as we've just got an outboard.
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  #16  
Old 11-25-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chibb View Post
Hi, we're currently planning an extended cruise, possibly england -> brazil, and are trying to determine what a conservative figure for average daily run would be. Our boat is a heavy 25 foot steel boat, sail area, approx 350 sq. feet.
Does anyone know of a source for daily run data to give an idea what we should be planning for?
Average daily runs are meaningless until after you have arrived at your destination. Based on reported "Average daily runs" we expected our crossing to take 26 to 30 days, not the actual 55 days. I'm guessing your boat is not a great light air sailer. I'd plan for any voyage to last three times longer than reported averages.



This is what it looked like for four days. That is 0.0 MPH just 120 miles from our projected landfall. We eventually drifted close enough to be within motoring range. My boat is faster than yours BTW.
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Last edited by vega1860; 11-25-2008 at 01:54 PM.
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  #17  
Old 11-25-2008
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Originally Posted by chibb View Post
Our current speed plucked out of thin air for planning is 3.5 knots, which would give daily runs of 84 miles.
Chibb,

That sounds about right, maybe a bit optimistic. I know the Roberts Tom Thumb boat design is a stout vessel, she'll take care of you, but I would not expect any great turn of speed from her especially passing through the doldrums.

Not trying to discourage you, just want to make sure you provision adequate food and water for the longer legs of the trip. Hopefully you'll make better runs and have more time to spend at your destinations!

P.S. For those unfamiliar with this design, it is similar to the PSC Dana 24, but usually in steel and a bit larger. Neat little boats:

Tom Thumb
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  #18  
Old 11-25-2008
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Never having crossed an ocean on a sailboat yet, wouldn't it be good to have some fuel for that outboard so you could motor until you found wind? As Vega points out, zero knots does nasty things to an average speed, and you could run the outboard at a slow, effficient rpm. I would think that adding some fuel bladders (and jerry cans) would decrease the amount of food and water needed, and therefore make a reasonable trade-off.

But like I said, I haven't sailed across an ocean yet.
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  #19  
Old 11-25-2008
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Originally Posted by Bene505 View Post
Never having crossed an ocean on a sailboat yet, wouldn't it be good to have some fuel for that outboard so you could motor until you found wind? As Vega points out, zero knots does nasty things to an average speed, and you could run the outboard at a slow, effficient rpm. I would think that adding some fuel bladders (and jerry cans) would decrease the amount of food and water needed, and therefore make a reasonable trade-off.

But like I said, I haven't sailed across an ocean yet.
Bene,

The conventional thinking is that the distances we're talking about on an ocean voyage are so long that motoring for a half a day or more would not make much difference, wind-wise. With an outboard, you would go through A LOT of fuel in 24 hours of motoring. Best to save it for when it's really needed (landfall) and wait for the wind to come to you.

At least, that is the usual thinking in small boats like these. But even many larger boats on longer passages adopt the same philosophy. On a boat your size for instance, you'd probably burn close to a gallon an hour, which would consume quite a bit of your reserves during a 2-3 day windless stretch on a 3-4 week Pacific passage.
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  #20  
Old 11-25-2008
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[QUOTE=JohnRPollard;407571]Chibb,

That sounds about right, maybe a bit optimistic. I know the Roberts Tom Thumb boat design is a stout vessel, she'll take care of you, but I would not expect any great turn of speed from her especially passing through the doldrums.

Yes, we've done a reasonable amount of sailing in F4/5 in her and she goes along nicely at 5/6 knots, but haven't done much at all in the lighter stuff. Thinking of having twin running headsails (twizzle rig). One hanked on, one free flying (wire luff) to give around 400 sq foot area.
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