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  #11  
Old 12-10-2008
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Two to Tandem: Maximizing Holding Power by Tandem Anchoring
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  #12  
Old 12-10-2008
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Sway--

Unfortunately, too many boats have woefully undersized anchors and are going to be in serious trouble should they be caught anchored out in a storm unexpectedly.

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Originally Posted by sailaway21 View Post
I fear the simple explanation belies the complexity of the operation. What Giu has diagrammed is simply an anchor resetting device; one that aids the primary anchor resetting on the change of the tide. I, like many others, think that either a single anchor well set or a Bahama moor would be superior to the method shown, certainly in terms of ease of use and lack of fouling.
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  #13  
Old 12-12-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailaway21 View Post
I, like many others, think that either a single anchor well set or a Bahama moor would be superior to the method shown, certainly in terms of ease of use and lack of fouling.
Sway, I agree that in the first instance a single anchor is better than any twin setup but when that doesn't hold . . . .

And I concur fully with the description offered in the link provided byCraig Smith on Bahamian anchoring. The couple of times I tried that I ended up spending more time untangling two chains than sleeping and that makes me grumpy. I don't even bother trying it anymore. And setting anchors in the Bahamian way is a bitch unless you have the balls to get in a dingy to set the second anchor in what must already be very inclement weather (else why bother?).

When you motor up at an angle to the first anchor it's near impossible to keep track of where it is to set the second one in the right spot. And if you get it wrong, one of them will drag until the rodes are bearing equal load. Unfortunately at that point, the anchors are already far closer together than you would have liked.

The tandem setup is way better. JMHO.

When warranted, I use exactly what Giu sketched.
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  #14  
Old 12-13-2008
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So what size do you consider right for which boats?

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Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
Sway--
Unfortunately, too many boats have woefully undersized anchors and are going to be in serious trouble should they be caught anchored out in a storm unexpectedly.
I know anchors depend on bottom and boat size and displacement so here is mine...

I sail a 6800lb fin keel 27' boat (Catalina 27) in the relativly protected waters of The Chesapeake Bay. I have 3 anchors; an 8S Danforth with 6' of chain and 75' of 3/8" nylon rode. This is my "lunch hook". I also have a Danforth 12H 6' chain and 120' of 1/2" nylon and a 7lb Fortress with 10' of chain and 200' of 1/2" nylon. The overnight and "go to" storm anchor is the 12H Danforth. I have never dragged anchor in that and have survived once in a 1 hour storm in somewhat open water (protected to windward by land 1/2 mile away) and blowing 45 knots. The ride was "interesting" and the GPS track showed a nice arc as we swung around, but we held firm. It was all I could do to recover the anchor after the storm.

So what single anchor do you reccomend?
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  #15  
Old 12-13-2008
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Danforths and Fortresses are horrible anchors in situations where the current or wind can reverse... since they can often be fouled and not reset. IMHO, you were fairly lucky not to drag.

If you're going to be anchored out overnight, I'd recommend going with a Delta FastSet 22 lb. at a minimum. A Rocna 10 (22 lbs.) or Manson Supreme would probably work very nicely as well, and have more holding power than the Delta. I'd add 30' of 1/4" of chain and use 1/2" octo-plait nylon for the rest of the rode. This would probably hold your boat an unprotected anchorage at 45 knots... probably even more than that.

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Originally Posted by mccary View Post
I know anchors depend on bottom and boat size and displacement so here is mine...

I sail a 6800lb fin keel 27' boat (Catalina 27) in the relativly protected waters of The Chesapeake Bay. I have 3 anchors; an 8S Danforth with 6' of chain and 75' of 3/8" nylon rode. This is my "lunch hook". I also have a Danforth 12H 6' chain and 120' of 1/2" nylon and a 7lb Fortress with 10' of chain and 200' of 1/2" nylon. The overnight and "go to" storm anchor is the 12H Danforth. I have never dragged anchor in that and have survived once in a 1 hour storm in somewhat open water (protected to windward by land 1/2 mile away) and blowing 45 knots. The ride was "interesting" and the GPS track showed a nice arc as we swung around, but we held firm. It was all I could do to recover the anchor after the storm.

So what single anchor do you reccomend?
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  #16  
Old 12-13-2008
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A rule of thumb is 1 pound of anchor for every foot of length. Use the biggest that you can handle on your bow roller. I would not rely on a lunch hook even for lunch if there is wind over about ten knots or any significant current. I agree that danforth style anchors are great when the wind direction and current do not change, but not reliable when they do. They will definitely bury themselves deeply in Chesapeake mud though. Delta or Bruce style anchors are proven and work well.

I see no need for tandem anchoring. Properly sized and set anchors of the right design do not need to be used in tandem. If you have a boat anywhere near forty feet, the problems of retrieving your tandem anchors when you are ready to go will likely cause you a back injury or at least an hour of total frustration (as will two anchors set in a Y). A single anchor is the best way to go unless you are battening down for a hurricane.
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This rule of thumb isn't all that accurate, since a 16' boat rarely needs a 16 lb. anchor, and much will depend on the design of the boat. Boats that have significantly more windage, like multihulls, will generally require a heavier anchor than would a flush-deck racing monohull of the same LOA. If the guys at your marina are laughing about how big the anchor on your bow roller is, then you're probably in the right ball park.

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Originally Posted by SYMandalay View Post
A rule of thumb is 1 pound of anchor for every foot of length. Use the biggest that you can handle on your bow roller. I would not rely on a lunch hook even for lunch if there is wind over about ten knots or any significant current. I agree that danforth style anchors are great when the wind direction and current do not change, but not reliable when they do. They will definitely bury themselves deeply in Chesapeake mud though. Delta or Bruce style anchors are proven and work well.
IMHO, tandem anchoring is generally the sign of an undersized primary anchor. Tandem anchoring and Bahamian moors make retrieval much more complicated.

If you're battening down for a named storm—you should probably be seeking the most sheltered waters you can find and using every dockline, long warp and anchor you've got to secure the boat.

Quote:
I see no need for tandem anchoring. Properly sized and set anchors of the right design do not need to be used in tandem. If you have a boat anywhere near forty feet, the problems of retrieving your tandem anchors when you are ready to go will likely cause you a back injury or at least an hour of total frustration (as will two anchors set in a Y). A single anchor is the best way to go unless you are battening down for a hurricane.
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  #18  
Old 12-13-2008
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McCary...The Chessie is one of the easiest places to anchor as it is almost all mud bottom and there are no strong currents and modest tide. A Fortress with the 45 degree mud setting is probably as good as anything but yours is rather undersized. In the Chessie it is all about penetration and fluke area in my opinion. For that reason...I would go with a Rocna or Manson Supreme rather than a Delta which I've had drag when the bottom gets really soupy. These new anchors give you additional security over the Fortress when they need to re-set as in when the wind does a 180 in a squall coming across the bay. The galvanized 25lb Manson should give you all the performance you will ever need in the bay at a reasonable price.
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Old 12-13-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SYMandalay View Post
If you have a boat anywhere near forty feet, the problems of retrieving your tandem anchors when you are ready to go will likely cause you a back injury or at least an hour of total frustration (as will two anchors set in a Y).
If you have a boat anywhere near 40 feet you should really be considering a windlass. Easy, fast retrieval and the only effort is pushing a button on my deck with my big toe.
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  #20  
Old 12-13-2008
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A windlass does a fine job of getting one anchor on board but that second one is a female dog.
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