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  #41  
Old 01-16-2011
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Vertex (Yaesu Standard Horizon) VX 1700 which costs about £uk 600.
Can do it all push button or tuning knob but powers that be are very touchy about it world wide.
Often the case that you cannot buy it in your own State(US) or only in your own state or outwith US from other countries.
If you live in New England you have a local state only supplier;In other states you can only buy it for export to UK for example.
I can buy it in UK but it might be an illegal sale!
It is refered to as a "land based" mobile radio even if its advertising literature shows an offshore oil rig!
One other point as far as I am aware under International Law anyone can use any radio on any chanel in a true emergency situation.
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  #42  
Old 01-16-2011
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Vertex VX 1700

Why would the authorities be nervous about it?
There are hundreds of "military style" radios around, both old and new.

It either has the approriate international approvals, or it doesn't.
It clearly isn't a marine set.

Radios which are customer programmable are rarely given CE and/or FCC type approvals.
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  #43  
Old 01-16-2011
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ICOM 802 (ham user interface)

Good discussion here.

I have an 802. When making this choice, I lacked the following data, so I thought I'd mention it here for anyone else trying to decide. Can it to do continuous tuning? That is, can you put it in a mode where it isn't channelized for the marine bands, and you can turn the knob and scan continuously across the ham bands.

The answer is yes. I was concerned about this because a earlier "opened" ICOM SSB model (cannot remember which one), would not do this. It made it a pain as a ham set, perfectly good for marine SSB operation.

The other question is how do you "open" the radio. There is a a simple sequence of button presses that allows the user to do so. No need to return to factory. Of course, you should only do this if you are appropriately licensed.

Would you be better off with a dedicated ham radio and dedicated SSB? Yes if you can fit it in your boat. Is the 802 a reasonable to operate as a ham set and SSB? YMMV, but I find it to be, and believe it is technically legal for both modes, assuming you and your vessel are appropriately licensed.
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  #44  
Old 01-16-2011
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" this does not excuse you for owning an unlicensed radio."
Sparky, forget about "mostly it's not illegal" but in the US, perhaps you could point out even ONE example of how or where it is illegal for anyone to own ANY radio, marine, aviation, police or even military, without any license or permit?
Outside of the US is quite another story, there are coutries like Red China where simple possession of a ham radio will get you jailed for espionage, even if you are a foreigner with a foreign license carrying it in with no intent to use it until you've left.

But here in the US? Just one example, please.

Proper emergency response, as taught by all of the organizations in the business including DHS and the military, begins with the formal "Planning" stage. And Planning begins with concepts like "OK, if we have this equipment and we modify it, we will be able to use it in emergencies." Yes, even the "illegal" modification can in fact be perfectly proper when it is done by the end-user (rather than a commercial seller) in anticipation of legal emergency use.
We (our goverment) have been very generous to ourselves when it comes to radiocommunications in the US.
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  #45  
Old 01-16-2011
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ffiill-
"It is refered to as a "land based" mobile radio even if its advertising literature shows an offshore oil rig!"
If the oil rig is fixed to the sea floor on pylons, as opposed to being anchored, then it IS a land-based structure, isn't it? Just a "house on stilts" that happen to be rather tall?

There is no doubt some provision making it legal (like a land-based yacht club or marina having a "marine" base station) , or perhaps in offshore waters no authority is concerned with it, since it would not interfere with any "land" in their venue.
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  #46  
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You might be suprised how regs vary from country to country.
Here in UK for example it will cost you nothing to register your yacht as a marine mobile station.You just complete an online application and you get your call sign-a bit like US visas!
But if you want a marine long range operators certificate to allow you to operate a marine HF radio it will cost you a minimum of about £500uk.Similarly a short range(VHF)certificate will cost about £100.
UK Han licences and with them personal call signs operate almost the same as in US-3 stages to full licence-nominal cost.
But in UK you can only operate on your call sign offshore on a full licence and with permission of ships captain marine HF.
Also over here if you are a European registered boat your Marine HF tranceiver has to have DSC emergency calling facilty which makes the cheaper Icoms sold in US illegal in UK unless you are a US registered vessel!
Bottom line is you pay £1200 plus for an Icom Marine SSB tranceiver which has to be modded to use on Ham frequencies and further modded to use on some US Ham frequencies ilegal in UK.
OR you buy say a 1990s vintage Yaesu FT757 for under $500 on e bay open it up and either slide the slide switch to open it up to all channels/swop over jumper leads.Or with later models just do a bit of playing with the programming.
You can then with your Ham licence/call sign/vessels call sign talk on the various worldwide marine Ham nets quite legally etc and if if your boat decides to sink or you have a heart attack you can put out a Mayday on the International Marine Emergency Chanels and risk having someone boarding your boat mid pacific as its sinking to check out whether you have the right bits of paper!
If you want to be Kosher then dont mod and just get a PAYG Iridium sat phone.
Problem with these for anything else is they are great to talk to your nearest and dearest back home but no good if you want to talk to the yacht 300 miles in front of you on way to Marquesas if you dont know its phone number which is where HF comes in!
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  #47  
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Ffill in some ways the UK is almost facist in the way it deals with radio communications. Here in the US we'd never tolerate government snooper vans going around to issue fines for unlicensed television sets. Hell, we can't even get the government to send out vans looking for criminal interference on the airwaves.

And as I recall it wasn't so long ago that London had a choice of four tv channels, all run by the government.

What IS the broadcast tv situation there now, btw?
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  #48  
Old 01-16-2011
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Vintage Yaesu FT-757 & Pactor Modem

Quote:
Originally Posted by ffiill View Post
OR you buy say a 1990s vintage Yaesu FT757 for under $500 on e bay open it up and either slide the slide switch to open it up to all channels/swop over jumper leads.Or with later models just do a bit of playing with the programming.
I have a General Class in the USA for thirty years. I have not used it for several decades; however, I am thinking of get a transceiver and having another go at it. The Yaesu FT-757 was mentioned here and I was thinking of getting one. The specifications did say that a computer could control it. Does this mean it will work with a Pactor modem?
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  #49  
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A few notes:

Firstly there are a lot more classes of license than just Marine or Ham. Many organisations require highly capable radios with frequency agility. Some examples are Search and Rescue, Marine Coast Stations, Government Monitoring Stations, Military, International Passenger and Freight Vessels, etc. These groups are often licensed to use fancy radios such as top-end Collins gear, Harris, ITT, Vertex, etc. But because of this, they also require their operators to have First Class or Coast Guard radio certificates so the operators won't get into trouble.

The important thing is that you must have the right class of radio and the right operators certificate for your station. To argue that you can "own any radio" is just blindness. If your station has an non-approved or modified radio in service, you risk being prosecuted if something goes wrong.

Just one example. The Radio Inspector is dragged out of bed by a panicky Emergency Operator who has some idiot interfering with an emergency channel. Perhaps lives have already been lost or put at risk. The inspector spends many late nights monitoring (and keeping his boss informed) and eventually determines that it is yacht so-and-so who is quietly travelling down the coast. Unfortunately some genius has picked an "unused" frequency to chat to his unlicensed "home base". What he doesn't realise is that he is on the input frequency of some duplex pair and is wiping out a critical channel. You can imagine the reception the boat gets when it finally sails into port. There will be quite a welcoming party with Customs, Police and FCC in attendance.

Simple possession of a modified radio will then be essential evidence in the forthcoming trial. I have seen exactly this scenario occur on a number of occasions. It is amazing how these idiot's bluster disappears when they are faced with giving evidence in a coroner's enquiry. I could give a dozen quite different but related examples.

One other point: Marine stations (including oil rigs, etc) are frequently (and quite legitimately) fitted with land-based gear for their non-marine communications (talk to head office, supply ships, helicopters, etc). This of course is in addition to their standard Marine Radio equipment.

Last edited by SparkyToo; 01-16-2011 at 06:36 PM.
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  #50  
Old 01-17-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LakeSuperiorGeezer View Post
I have a General Class in the USA for thirty years. I have not used it for several decades; however, I am thinking of get a transceiver and having another go at it. The Yaesu FT-757 was mentioned here and I was thinking of getting one. The specifications did say that a computer could control it. Does this mean it will work with a Pactor modem?
The 757 can be controlled using a cat cable to computer-however as I recall you cannot use a Pactor modem-however check out the latest software system RMS express which works with winlink.
http://www.winlink.org/
Check out downloads link.

No need for a pactor modem as it works via a sound card same way as you receive weather fax to an ssb receiver and into a visual form on your PC.
There is a load of info on this elsewhere on Sailnet.
All you will need is a data interface on cable to PC which you can buy or build kit form.
If you want a Pactor compatible Yaesu go for the FT840-no more than £300 uk on ebay-similar pricing on US ebay
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