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  #21  
Old 04-05-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kananumpua View Post
...The all important tether. Very good spot. The boat has tethers on board. I probably should have posted this in the original post.....

SPF long sleeve shirts. I was afraid someone would suggest them. They are pricey. But, hate being burned and don't want cancer on down the road....
Good post, great trip you're planning!

As others have suggested, you seem to be going a bit overboard on the personal electronics. There's a lot of opportunity for savings there. If the boat had a certified liferaft and EPIRB, that would do it for me. An SSB/Ham system would be desirable, but the EPIRB can also be used for emergency communication (a ship with comm would get redirected to you.)

However, I would not skimp on the tether. You indicate that the boat has it's own, but what sort? Best to get your very own, one that is ORC compliant, and better still one that has twin-tethers so you're never unattached when on deck. ORC compliant refers to strength, but also includes a quick-release shackle so you can release the tether if you end up underwater (if the boat is rolled or sinking fast).

The SPF shirts are well worth the investment. Shop around, they can be found on sale. What I like about them is they also wick moisture, but don't retain much. As such they can be rinsed out and dried quickly, then reworn. Don't bother with the short-sleeve versions. Just get long sleeve and roll the sleeves up (they have straps that hold the sleeves up).

Have fun!!
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NEVER CALLS CRUISINGDAD BACK....CAN"T TAKE THE ACCENT
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  #22  
Old 04-05-2009
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Having made a long offshore passage in that area- here are some tips. A SSB for the boat is a must. Weather forecasts are only good for 3 days out. You will be out longer. Check to see if skipper has any experience with a weather router (herb at Southbound II, free). His weather routing advice is spot on. A Sat phone is nice. Use it only for critical communication. Our globalstar phone worked great in the North Atlantic. Obviously charts are a must. An electronic chart program and laptop is a plus.
Gear- you have a good handle on it. In a saltwater environment even the best gear absorbs some salt which is hydroscopic. The moisture that salt in your clothing wicks in is what gives you a chill. I prefer Dry Shirt and Pro Wik Shirts. Good sunglasses are a must. The best for water work are blue mirror glass lenses. Expensive. Check out the Acies website for moderately priced ones. Stay away from polycarbonate lenses if you can. The fatigue from the distortions in plastic lenses will get to you.A good folding knife with serrated blade is a must. Boots, I don't believe in them. They can be like cement shoes if you go overboard. Regular athletic deck shoes (Sperry Fugawis etc) with Sealkins or Goretex socks keep your feet dry and you will have better footing. Spyderco safety knife clipped to lifevest is a good idea. Another thing that game in handy was a small LED bite lite. They come with a blue light and strobe for about 10 bucks. Also a LE headlamp with white and red lights is great for night work on deck. Speaking of night work. Never go on deck without a life jacket on and never fail to clip on at night.
Based on experience, radar is almost a must have due to ship traffic. It also helps you dodge localized squalls. When you get on the boat, do a safety check with the skipper. Go through the boat and find all the thru-hulls are. Hopefully they are double clamped. Know where the medical kit is, etc.. A crisis is not the time to be searching for these things.

Good luck. Use common sense. You will be fine and most likely bored for most of the trip. It is those times when weather gets dodgy that it could be interesting. EPIRBS are great, but you will not have a CG helo coming out that far. The best you can hope for is a freighter assisting you if you get in real trouble.
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  #23  
Old 04-06-2009
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Hey again everyone,

Sorry about the belated response. I ended up going home for the weekend. I figure it will be the last chance I could hang out with the family before I depart. So I took my mom up to Stone Mountain and hung out with some family friends. It was a good relaxing weekend w/ perfect weather.





OK, back to the crossing talk:

It also turns out that my dad does have friend who has worked as crew for a dozen+ deliveries to the Caribbean from various places along the East coast. He was able to offer up some valuable advice. Most of it echoed by the responses of this thread. Talking to him and reading these posts also help alleviate some of the stress. Makes me feel a little less crazy.

SV:
The SPOT's spotty (yes, cheasy pun intended) coverage was brought up this weekend. I gave the family a warning that the SPOT unit may not track me and to not freakout. Thanks.

I have used the baby wipes trick for camping as well. Makes a significant difference, and no water necessary.

I have read several things about Sturgeron, seems to be a legit remidy. I think I will opt for the oral laxitive instead if constipation comes up.

My GF and I have been cooking a decent amount lately. Sadly I'm not much of a cook. I am hoping to master one or two simple dishes before departure though.

I've got a small list of knots mastered. The same 5 or so that I use for everything on a boat. Unfortunately that damn sqaure knot always takes me two tries. You would think that I would have learned by now (haha).

mccubbin:
Great website by the way! Is the hull aluminum?

I also sent an e-mail to the Owner regarding the communications capabilities and his feelings on me using it once a week or so. I'm sure it's all there but I just wanted to make sure and clearify, ahead of time, that I could use it to check in. It would be nice if I didn't have to rent a sat phone. Save some money.

bb74:
I decided to bring an old handheld GPS that I have instead of investing a new one. Probably won't even use it like you say.

Thanks for the specific clothing brand/material suggestions. The active wear selection is vast.

Hand lotion, eye drops and spair gloves have now been added. Thanks

McCary:
I was thinking about just using the tracking feature everyday around noon. Turn it on for an hour to acquire and an hour after to make sure the message goes through.

billyruffn:
I think I'll be able to relax (a little) once all my orders come in.

Awaiting response from owner in regard to the comm. capabilities and feelings on me using it.

Fishing, YES PLEASE. This is what I'm looking forward to. I have always wanted to fish with a hand line like you suggest. It seems so crude but effective, and I like that. I know it's a popular method but I have never had the opportunity to try it. I have a specific question I will PM you today or tomorrow.

And soy, is crucial. Good call. Added to list.

JRP:
I'm working to thin the electronics but still keeping the PLB. I did have too much.

I will chat with the owner about the harness and tether. I was just looking around and like the Spinlock Deckvest and dual tether. It's pricey but seems nice.

Fun.... who said anything about fun! There will be none of this nonsense. Ok, maybe a little.
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  #24  
Old 04-06-2009
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Be aware that the Deckvest and the Deckware Pro, both by spinlock, are great PFD/harnesses, but IIRC are not USCG approved. They are better than average blue water harness/PFDs as they have some features others do not, like the attached strobe, a spray hood, etc. BTW, as part of full disclosure, I normally use a Deckware pro as my PFD/harness and love it.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #25  
Old 04-07-2009
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Just a dumb personal question: Who are the South Africans you'll be sailing with?
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  #26  
Old 04-07-2009
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Kananumpua,

It's Freeman, I met you a few years ago to talk about sailing. I'm glad to hear you're taking the plunge and getting out there!
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  #27  
Old 04-07-2009
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LOL... small world isn't it..

Quote:
Originally Posted by redstripesailor View Post
Kananumpua,

It's Freeman, I met you a few years ago to talk about sailing. I'm glad to hear you're taking the plunge and getting out there!
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Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
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  #28  
Old 04-07-2009
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Stone mountain - great climbing spot!

I've spent many days scaring myself on the long run-outs. Cool.

Regarding ski gloves; if you can't get them dry, they are little use. Everything must have quick dry removable liners and no permanant insulation. Multiple pairs of thin fleece liners are good.

Ski goggles work as sun glasses and add more warmth to your face than you would think. Highly recomended and NOT just for the high lattitudes.


Have fun!
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  #29  
Old 04-07-2009
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Omatako:
Sent you a PM

RedStripe:
Great to hear from you again. Sent you a PM

SD:
I actually met him here on sailnet when I was looking for crew positions last summer.

pdq:
Thats too ballsy for me! We did see someone climbing one of the rock faces solo. Looked pretty intense.
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  #30  
Old 04-07-2009
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We're in the getting ready to go phase so I don't have any advice on the crossing but two possible money savers:

- RIT Sunguard will turn your own long sleeve shirts (and bandanas, and pants, and...) into SPF 30 for a fairly large number of washings. I'm sure the SPF shirts are much better but the RIT sunguard is an inexpensive option and you can retreat or treat new clothes with each packet.

- We bought 4x4 patches of SOLAS tape from reflectivelyYOURS.com for what (at the time) seemed like the best price
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Last edited by Livia; 04-07-2009 at 12:30 PM.
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