Production Boats and the Limits - Page 10 - SailNet Community
 775Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #91 of 2156 Old 04-20-2009
Senior Member
 
blt2ski's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 6,884
Thanks: 0
Thanked 30 Times in 29 Posts
Rep Power: 12
   
Smack,

Now you are into the what and how you want somethng built. Example, i probably would not take a tartan offshore, altho the older fiberglass ones are held in high regard. One of the things I do not like about them, is the door way into the cabin, goes all the way down to the cockpit floor, vs some designs have the door stopping at the seat top. Yes you have to climb up and over, BUT, if the doors break, you have less water getting into the cabin per wave that poops over you. Now, in a really bad storm, you're probably screwed either way. But with a smaller opening, I have a slightly better chance at stopping the inflow when the time comes. Hense why this is on some folks prefered design want for a blue water boat.

I am not saying a Tartan is a bad boat either, it is a good fast design, just this part of the design does not thrill me if I was going off shore etc.

marty

She drives me boat,
I drives me dinghy!
blt2ski is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #92 of 2156 Old 04-20-2009
... a logical conclusion
 
Sequitur's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: At Sea
Posts: 430
Thanks: 6
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 9
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keldee View Post
Anyway it gets really complicated with insurance and hurricane and cyclone seasons!
We will be fully insured for our entire voyage, but with my professional marine qualifications, this is not very expensive. The hurricane and cyclone seasons are simply a part of any prudent sailor's planning.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Keldee View Post
Try not to be too expedition-grade minded,a few fine things dont take up to much room and space and makes it feel more like home!For example ,we had cloth napkins and stainles wine goblets(cant stand those plastic things)
I wholeheartedly agree on the nice stuff. My decades of expeditionary mountaineering taught me that, even though it is sometimes necessary to rough it, that does not mean you should deny yourself all comforts. I learned the fine art of camping in style, and I apply that to my boating.

Sequitur will be our home for the next ten years or so as we slowly explore the planet, so we have such things as Irish linen napkins, Henkels cookware and knives, Riedel stemware and fine china all securely stowed for sea. These are readily accessible for the quiet anchorages, which will be the vast majority of the time, so why not be comfortable?
skygazer likes this.

Cheers,
Michael

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

1908 Wildschut Skūtsje

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Sequitur is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #93 of 2156 Old 04-20-2009 Thread Starter
Last Man Standing
 
smackdaddy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 14,578
Thanks: 153
Thanked 149 Times in 142 Posts
Rep Power: 10
     
Quote:
Originally Posted by blt2ski View Post
Smack,

Now you are into the what and how you want somethng built. Example, i probably would not take a tartan offshore, altho the older fiberglass ones are held in high regard. One of the things I do not like about them, is the door way into the cabin, goes all the way down to the cockpit floor, vs some designs have the door stopping at the seat top. Yes you have to climb up and over, BUT, if the doors break, you have less water getting into the cabin per wave that poops over you. Now, in a really bad storm, you're probably screwed either way. But with a smaller opening, I have a slightly better chance at stopping the inflow when the time comes. Hense why this is on some folks prefered design want for a blue water boat.

I am not saying a Tartan is a bad boat either, it is a good fast design, just this part of the design does not thrill me if I was going off shore etc.

marty
Now THAT'S a good comparison, Bluto. Makes perfect sense - and gives some perspective on the kind of thing to look for in a BAPB.

PS - Get over to the Sacrilege thread in Racing and let's figure out how to make sailing cool again, dude.
smackdaddy is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #94 of 2156 Old 04-21-2009
Senior Member
 
Valiente's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Toronto
Posts: 5,491
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 11
   
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keldee View Post
Anyway it gets really complicated with insurance and hurricane and cyclone seasons!
Try not to be too expedition-grade minded,a few fine things dont take up to much room and space and makes it feel more like home!For example ,we had cloth napkins and stainles wine goblets(cant stand those plastic things)
I like the idea of SS goblets...We're not going to be uncivilized, but we are keeping the tech manageable, installing foot pumps, that sort of thing. I always want to be on the high side of producing and storing electricity for refrigeration and lighting and nav over pumps and DVD players and water heating.

As for the insurance, I'm hoping seamanship will keep me off the reef and reefing early will keep me out of the loft.

Can't sleep? Read my countdown to voyaging blog @
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Valiente is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #95 of 2156 Old 04-21-2009 Thread Starter
Last Man Standing
 
smackdaddy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 14,578
Thanks: 153
Thanked 149 Times in 142 Posts
Rep Power: 10
     
Sequitur - dude, I like your style. I took a look at your website. Nice work. It'll be great to follow your voyages.
smackdaddy is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #96 of 2156 Old 04-21-2009
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Manitoulin Island Ontario
Posts: 116
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
 
Stainless goblets can be bought at West Marine
Keldee is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #97 of 2156 Old 04-21-2009
Senior Member
 
blt2ski's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 6,884
Thanks: 0
Thanked 30 Times in 29 Posts
Rep Power: 12
   
Smack,

Thinking about my comparison comments above. I wish I could remember where I saw the plus's/minus comments about the two doorway's. It may have been in the European "Ocean A" ratings, and how and what allows a boat to meet those specs, vs B or C rated boats.

I went to the mahina site, and all I could find there are what boats they recommend etc. Altho I was perusing rather quickly. But I did not see what "I" would call "What to look for in a BW capable boat"

While as mentioned, some cookie cutter production boats will go off shore, some have a better design intent that others. What you and others, myself if I ever figure out how to go offshore, need to look for, are these design features that make better off shore boats.

Like a post in the boat buying the other day, a fellow was worried that a 6'4" draft boat was too deep. Hell, if you ground in the ICW at 6'4", I'd bet he'd ground in the 6' boat too! My thought is, one needs to plus/minus certain issues as to where they are going to go. If you're really going off shore for a 2-3 week passage, you had better have plenty of tankage, or a water maker on boat to suppliment lack of tankage if you will in water. Or have some sort of rain collector. Mean while, someone like myself in puget sound, you in your BIG texas lake, if you go cruising, you're out for a day or to or three, maybe a week. BUT, you have marina's, at least I do every 2-4 hrs max along the way! so while I only have 7 gals, or about 6-8 hrs of fuel at 3/4 throttle, it is not a big deal. Meanwhile, the person that wants to be able to motor for 24-28 hrs, better have a 50'ish gal fuel tank, or some way to store that much, using .75-1 gal per hr usage like my motor does. OR if you do do a 12 hr run like I have a couple of time, one takes a 5 gal container of diesel and a no spill nozzle, and fill while motoring!

I really do not feel there are rights and wrongs to what and how a boat should be built, designed etc. but, there are certainly some design issues that one should make sure that your boat meets what you feel is important to you! Myself, tankage is not a big deal, the door is, even for local cruising. A cockpit mounted main traveller, so I can release it from the helm, jib sheets to steer position, reasonable tankage for ones useage, this may vary.

Enjoy the hunt for your new boat. Meanwhile, If I could afford one, a Jeanneau Sunfast 3200 or equal would be in my slip for my usage. Saw some specs on a Beneteau Figaro a bit ago, be still my beating heart! Looks like as some one said, had not thought about it before, a mini transat about 33' long! hubba hubba!

She drives me boat,
I drives me dinghy!
blt2ski is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #98 of 2156 Old 04-22-2009
Senior Member
 
imagine2frolic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 1,830
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 8
 
I would pretty much bet everybody has touched bottom. It's just the way it is. Now making a habit of it is not good .....i2f

20 MPH ain't fast unless, you do it in a 1000sq 3/2 house on 10foot waves
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


BORROWED, No single one of us is as smart as all of us!
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
imagine2frolic is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #99 of 2156 Old 04-22-2009
Senior Member
 
christyleigh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: North Brookfield, Mass.
Posts: 935
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 14
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by blt2ski View Post
I wish I could remember where I saw the plus's/minus comments about the two doorway's. It may have been in the European "Ocean A" ratings, and how and what allows a boat to meet those specs, vs B or C rated boats.
I know I have mentioned the "doors" issue about my Nauticat before so it's possible that it is back there some where. My Nauticat is only rated "B" because it has the sliding doors on the side as all the NC "Traditional Motorsailer" are. The other Nauticat line "Pilot House" sailboats are rated "A" as they have the traditional sailboat companionway in the cockpit.
The '99 Catalina 320 I traded in for my '99 Nauticat 331 was rated "Ocean A" ......but which one do you think I'd rather be in while experiencing a Perfect Storm in the North Atlantic While I agree that the sliding side doors are an issue to be remidied I know there are lot more NC 33's out cruising the worlds oceans than C320's

Stan
'Christy Leigh'
NC 331
Wickford/Narragansett Bay RI
christyleigh is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #100 of 2156 Old 04-22-2009 Thread Starter
Last Man Standing
 
smackdaddy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 14,578
Thanks: 153
Thanked 149 Times in 142 Posts
Rep Power: 10
     
Well, here's one I would feel very comfortable putting on my FAIL list.

FAIL
smackdaddy is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.


User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome