Production Boats and the Limits - Page 9 - SailNet Community
 770Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #81 of 2155 Old 04-18-2009
Senior Member
 
Valiente's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Toronto
Posts: 5,491
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 11
   
I would agree with that. The Bahamas seems to favour centerboarders that can make good use of the frequently decent winds. Also, it's not like you're 800 miles offshore. All you need is money.

Can't sleep? Read my countdown to voyaging blog @
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Valiente is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #82 of 2155 Old 04-18-2009
Senior Member
 
billyruffn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 1,295
Thanks: 5
Thanked 28 Times in 19 Posts
Rep Power: 11
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Valiente View Post
^ ^ ^

None of which your average Beneteau owner wants, needs or frankly, would understand or recognize, because they are never more than a hundred miles from a marina or a SAR service.
I'm usually one of the first to bash Bendy-toys, but I have friends in the UK that have sailed a First 345 for over twenty years. They've crossed the Atlantic twice, sailed the east and west coasts of Greenland, visited Jan Mayen land, circumnavigated Iceland, spent several summers above the Arctic circle in Norway and Russia, and sailed to Svalbard twice (I was with them when we crossed 80N), in addition to many thousands of miles of coastal crusing. The boat is in good shape and still going strong.

To SmackDaddy's OP -- you can probably take almost any boat anywhere...IF you know what you're doing and do it at the right time of year, are properly equipped, etc., etc. Taking light production day sailers to the Arctic (or other exteme places) obviously carries increased risks, but it can be done.
billyruffn is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #83 of 2155 Old 04-18-2009
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Manitoulin Island Ontario
Posts: 116
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
 
Hi Valiente
How much money you need is relavent to how much you are prepared to do without or not.We spent 2 years on a boat and yearly cost(everything was included as account was made of each cent spent) was $17,000 Can(this was when $500US cost us $750 Can.Of course we very rarely used a marina,our only meals out were 3 times bought lunch,a treat was an ice-cream EACH no cell phone and we very often shared a beer.We enjoyed ourselves very much and are glad we didn't wait until we had more money,bigger boat more stuff etc.
Keldee is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #84 of 2155 Old 04-18-2009
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Old Greenwich, CT
Posts: 128
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
 
Any boat anywhere?

I think you have to be careful about suggesting any boat anywhere. Yes, there are folks who have done it. But you have to consider what your own skill level is, how much risk you are willing to take, and how much creature comforts you want.

I have enjoyed a lot of great coastal cruising from Annapolis through Nantucket on a relatively light boat - an Express '34. I am always cognizant of what I think my abilities are relative to the boat and where I am sailing. One of the major considerations is who is my crew. Here in the Northeast, if you are staying close to shore, with reasonable access to ports, then you can cruise in lighter boats.

Part of that is because our weather is a little more predictable than other spots. We usually know when we run the risk of storms, etc. In other parts of the country, I might feel the need for a more blue water capable boat for longer cruises.

I think we have to be careful about saying any boat anytime without knowing the abilities of the sailor and the planned itinerary. Better safe than sorry.
twinsdad is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #85 of 2155 Old 04-19-2009
Senior Member
 
Valiente's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Toronto
Posts: 5,491
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 11
   
Quote:
Originally Posted by billyruffn View Post
I'm usually one of the first to bash Bendy-toys, but I have friends in the UK that have sailed a First 345 for over twenty years. They've crossed the Atlantic twice, sailed the east and west coasts of Greenland, visited Jan Mayen land, circumnavigated Iceland, spent several summers above the Arctic circle in Norway and Russia, and sailed to Svalbard twice (I was with them when we crossed 80N), in addition to many thousands of miles of coastal crusing. The boat is in good shape and still going strong..
The Bene First line is pretty good, and in the right hands is suitable, in my view. The Oceanis line and the current stuff, less so, again in my view. There are crack sailors cruising in old J-Boats...and I'm not going to criticize a crack sailor. I think that the opportunity to become a crack sailor, outside of crew racing, is less common on current production boats because I think they are harder to handle in heavy conditions than more deliberately seakindly designs.

Also, tankage is a huge factor...modern performance cruisers don't always have it. I would be curious how the Bene First folks dealt with this as the Arctic travel would require diesel burning for heat as well as for the frequent calm conditions that required motoring.

Can't sleep? Read my countdown to voyaging blog @
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Valiente is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #86 of 2155 Old 04-19-2009
Senior Member
 
Valiente's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Toronto
Posts: 5,491
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 11
   
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keldee View Post
Hi Valiente
How much money you need is relavent to how much you are prepared to do without or not.We spent 2 years on a boat and yearly cost(everything was included as account was made of each cent spent) was $17,000 Can(this was when $500US cost us $750 Can.Of course we very rarely used a marina,our only meals out were 3 times bought lunch,a treat was an ice-cream EACH no cell phone and we very often shared a beer.We enjoyed ourselves very much and are glad we didn't wait until we had more money,bigger boat more stuff etc.
Our budget will be about $25,000K Cdn./year for our circ., and we base this on avoiding marinas and shoreside dinners also. Keeping a strict account of "kitty drain" is the way to go.

Can't sleep? Read my countdown to voyaging blog @
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Valiente is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #87 of 2155 Old 04-19-2009
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Manitoulin Island Ontario
Posts: 116
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
 
Good for you!!! Just don't wait too long or the stuff you got ready at the beginning will need repairing or replacing again!!!!Will you be taking out supplementary health insurance and insuring the boat?
Keldee is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #88 of 2155 Old 04-20-2009
Senior Member
 
Valiente's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Toronto
Posts: 5,491
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 11
   
Yes to the extended health insurance, no for the boat insurance (likely, anyway). As people proposing a circ., there aren't a lot of options that aren't going to boost our yearly expenses by 40%-50%, so as the boat is steel and is not our only residence, it's its own insurance. Our thinking isn't fixed on this, however; this is today's opinion only.

We aren't bringing priceless heirlooms with us, anyway. The whole cruising philosophy isn't geared to that...it's more "expedition-grade", not fine china!

Can't sleep? Read my countdown to voyaging blog @
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Valiente is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #89 of 2155 Old 04-20-2009
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Manitoulin Island Ontario
Posts: 116
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
 
Anyway it gets really complicated with insurance and hurricane and cyclone seasons!
Try not to be too expedition-grade minded,a few fine things dont take up to much room and space and makes it feel more like home!For example ,we had cloth napkins and stainles wine goblets(cant stand those plastic things)
Keldee is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #90 of 2155 Old 04-20-2009 Thread Starter
Last Man Standing
 
smackdaddy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 14,438
Thanks: 149
Thanked 140 Times in 133 Posts
Rep Power: 9
     
Okay - so maybe there really isn't a distinct vein here. It appears that, as always, it comes down more to the sailor and his/her seamanship than it does the boat. And - if this is really the case, it would hold that (as said above) virtually any reputable production boat can (with logical care and preparation) indeed be sailed virtually anywhere in the world if one does not feel the need to drive it through repeated Force 9+ storms.

The Bene's still seem to have the best reputations - with Catalinas and newer Hunters right in the mix. And no one has mentioned a specific production boat that DEFINITELY WOULDN'T make the cut to prudent off-shore sailing (Irwin, O'Day, etc.). So maybe we take that angle.

Which boat(s) would you NOT trust - and why?
smackdaddy is online now  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.


User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome