Sailing the world - need papers? - Page 2 - SailNet Community
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #11 of 27 Old 05-08-2009
Senior Member
 
OsmundL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Norway (sometimes)
Posts: 361
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by privatearms View Post
If you sail the world, do you accually need any passports, visas and so on?
Privatearms, in retrospect, it was irresponsible to even begin a reply to your question. The conditions vary so much that only specific information from each country has any real relevance. By far the best place to find updated information by country is at Noonsite.com. To show you the range (and provide some amusement) here are some arbitrary direct quotes from Noonsite, in no particular order:

Brazil:
In some ports the authorities insist on everyone having a visa, even nationalities that are normally exempt.

Japan
A de-ratting certificate must be shown.
Visitors must bring a copy of their doctor's prescription as well as a letter stating the purpose of the drug.

Greece
Entry may be refused if there are Turkish Cyprus stamps in the passport.

South Africa
A yellow fever vaccination certificate may be requested if arriving from some African countries.

Singapore
Firearms, including spear guns, need an import permit from the Marine Police. The permit must be obtained in advance - two weeks is the minimum period necessary for obtaining a permit. It is now a requirement that visiting yachts must obtain cruising permits in order to cruise within Port of Singapore waters, including moving between marinas. In order to qualify for the permit, the visiting yacht must be fitted with an IMO AIS transponder or a Harbour Craft Transponder System (HARTS) transponder. Yachts not fitted with such a device may rent one.

Italy
The proof of insurance requirements are exacting; proof of third party insurance issued by an insurance company having reciprocal arrangements with a recognised Italian insurance company with an Italian translation, or insurance bought in Italy through an Italian broker. It is illegal for yachts to cruise in Italian waters without valid third-party insurance. Yachts which do not have insurance may not be allowed to leave the harbour until they obtain it.

Vanuatu
Automatic and semi automatic weapons are not to be brought into the country at all as these are strictly prohibited and severe penalties are in place for any breach of these prohibitions.
You may not have onboard obscene publications, or videos, narcotics (other than genuine medical emergency drugs).

Micronesia
A cruising permit must be obtained in advance of arrival. One should apply in writing to the Chief of Immigration. The application should contain the following information: boat name, port and flag of registration, LOA, net and gross tonnage, crew list, detailed itinerary, intended port of entry. It takes several months to receive an answer.

Indonesia
Portuguese nationals will be refused entry. Israelis require special permission. One should carry a large quantity of photocopies of documents, especially the cruising permit and yacht registration document, enough to be given to officials at all ports of call. Otherwise, all yachts must obtain a cruising permit and security clearance in advance. The formalities for this must be done through an approved agent. Agents should be chosen with care as yachts have sometimes not been dealt with fairly.

Croatia
Documents needed are the registration certificate, certificate of competence, third party insurance certificate, crew lists, radio licence, and a list of all dutiable items such as alcohol, tobacco and any movable objects not part of the yacht's equipment, such as cameras, portable radios or the outboard engine. A cruising permit will be issued by the Harbourmaster, which must be shown at subsequent stops.

French Polynesia
Each person from a non-EU country on board the yacht must deposit in a French Polynesian bank a sum of money equivalent to a one-way air ticket back to their home country.

New Zealand
All crew are required to show evidence of funds of $400 NZ per month if living on the yacht. The owner of the yacht must show evidence of owership and of adequate 3rd party insurance. The Agricultural Department (MAF) charges time and mileage to inspect boats and this inspection must be conducted immediately on arrival. Yachts may share the cost between them.

Turkey
As of 1st January 2009, a detailed inventory must be completed and stamped by Customs. This form will be compared with a similar produced on exit from the country. Any differences must be supported by a purchase receipt or sales receipt (with customer details)
------
As for Russia, I won't even begin to describe the rules.
OsmundL is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #12 of 27 Old 05-08-2009
Telstar 28
 
sailingdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,290
Thanks: 0
Thanked 14 Times in 12 Posts
Rep Power: 14
         
Osmund—

I'd point out that I mentioned noonsite.com all the way back in post #3...

Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
sailingdog is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #13 of 27 Old 05-08-2009
Senior Member
 
OsmundL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Norway (sometimes)
Posts: 361
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
Osmund—I'd point out that I mentioned noonsite.com all the way back in post #3...
Sure, SD. Having a bad hair day?
OsmundL is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #14 of 27 Old 05-08-2009
Splashed
 
JomsViking's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 554
Thanks: 28
Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Rep Power: 9
 
Guys, don't forget to mention noonsite.com..................



Sorry, couldn't help it...
JomsViking is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #15 of 27 Old 05-08-2009
Senior Member
 
Omatako's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Auckland New Zealand
Posts: 2,536
Thanks: 1
Thanked 32 Times in 29 Posts
Rep Power: 12
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by OsmundL View Post
French Polynesia
Each person from a non-EU country on board the yacht must deposit in a French Polynesian bank a sum of money equivalent to a one-way air ticket back to their home country.
Oh if it were so simple . . . .

We arrived in Marquesas (Frech Polynesia) and reported to the Gendarmerie. They sent us to the bank to take care of our bond. Because I was then travelling on a South African passport even though permanently resident in New Zealand, they initially insisted on a bond large enough to fly me back to SA.

When we eventually proved to them that we were permanently living in New Zealand and had been for several years, they concede to reduce the bond by about 40%.

The bank insisted on US$ so we lost on conversion from NZ$ to US$. Then the bank took (I think) an 8% commission on the US$ value.

When we left French Polynesia (checked out from Bora Bora), we requested our bond refund in NZ$. "Sorry, no NZ$." How about US$? "Sorry, no US$." We eventually received the entire bond in French Polynesian francs (almost needed a kit bag) on which we would have lost 15% on exchange when we got home. So we spent it in Bora Bora on provisions at exorbitant prices. . . . Oh, and the bank took another 8% commission to give the money back to us.

I reckon our "fully refundable" bond cost us about US$300.

Incidentally, if you're travelling on an EU passport, no bond is required in FP. You can live, stay and work there for as long as it suits you.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

__________________

"Two possibilities exist: Either we are alone in the Universe or we are not. Both are equally terrifying."

Arthur C. Clarke
Omatako is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #16 of 27 Old 05-08-2009
Senior Member
 
OsmundL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Norway (sometimes)
Posts: 361
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JomsViking View Post
Guys, don't forget to mention noonsite.com..................
You messing with my commission?
OsmundL is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #17 of 27 Old 05-08-2009
Senior Member
 
OsmundL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Norway (sometimes)
Posts: 361
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Omatako View Post
When we left French Polynesia (checked out from Bora Bora), we requested our bond refund in NZ$. "Sorry, no NZ$." How about US$? "Sorry, no US$." We eventually received the entire bond in French Polynesian francs (almost needed a kit bag) on which we would have lost 15% on exchange when we got home. So we spent it in Bora Bora on provisions at exorbitant prices. . . . Oh, and the bank took another 8% commission to give the money back to us.
Perhaps that is why noonsite also says: (maybe you wrote that part?)
"Because of currency fluctuation, one should insist that the money is not changed into the local currency (Pacific Franc), but kept in US dollars, so that the refund is made in the same currency as the deposit. This is possible at Banque de Polynesie or Banque Socredo (check commission rates as these can vary from bank to bank)"

Se how easy it is, Jomsviking!
OsmundL is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #18 of 27 Old 05-08-2009
Senior Member
 
Valiente's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Toronto
Posts: 5,491
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 11
   
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
I'd point out that some countries require a bond for any crew you bring with you. This is to ensure the crew can leave the country via plane if they decide not to leave when you depart.
Last time I checked, it was $1,500 U.S. for crew in French Polynesia, because they got very weary of people just jumping ship decades ago and becoming beach bums.

Don't know if it's been mentioned, but some places want to see vaccination records for the crew, and others, like Australia, have bans on many types of fresh food and WILL force you to dispose of it. Needless to say, guns are right out in most places: it's either "forget about it" or you hand them over to some distant and perhaps humid lock-up. Not worth it.

Every place has regulations and document requirements specific to the country, and as has been pointed out, some of the smallest countries are the most official-orientated.

One thing I've heard for a long time is that a "ship's stamp" comes in handy, a way for you to stamp THEIR documents in a way they recognize.

Can't sleep? Read my countdown to voyaging blog @
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Valiente is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #19 of 27 Old 05-09-2009 Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 14
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
Papers

Quote:
Originally Posted by Valiente View Post
Last time I checked, it was $1,500 U.S. for crew in French Polynesia, because they got very weary of people just jumping ship decades ago and becoming beach bums.

Don't know if it's been mentioned, but some places want to see vaccination records for the crew, and others, like Australia, have bans on many types of fresh food and WILL force you to dispose of it. Needless to say, guns are right out in most places: it's either "forget about it" or you hand them over to some distant and perhaps humid lock-up. Not worth it.

Every place has regulations and document requirements specific to the country, and as has been pointed out, some of the smallest countries are the most official-orientated.

One thing I've heard for a long time is that a "ship's stamp" comes in handy, a way for you to stamp THEIR documents in a way they recognize.
Hey, thank you for all the information. First, I will be going to POLAND, then ITALY, and then Australia, and back to US. I am originally from Poland, so I know I can go there whenever I want. I am also a Perm Resident in the US, so I can stay here as well. Italy and Australia will need more exploring. Thank you once again.
privatearms is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #20 of 27 Old 05-10-2009
Telstar 28
 
sailingdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,290
Thanks: 0
Thanked 14 Times in 12 Posts
Rep Power: 14
         
I'd point out that this guy doesn't have a boat yet... is in Florida, hoping someone will give him a boat that he can sail back to New Jersey... where his wife and four kids are waiting... So chances are pretty good all the laws will have changed by the time he casts off his docklines...since he'd have to buy a boat first.

Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
sailingdog is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.


User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Learning to Share PracticalSailor Practical Sailor 21 03-31-2015 01:55 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome