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  #21  
Old 08-23-2009
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Do NOT let anyone tell you you shouldn't go sailing because you get seasick. As someone else said I also get horribly seasick, car sick, and any other kind of motion sickness. Always hated roller coasters. When I started my circumnavigation I heaved my guts over the side for 48 hours and hated every second of it. By day three I started feeling human, and by day four felt like a rock star.

Seasickness is manageable in every one of it's forms through general preventative measures to stronger medications. You can find the balance that works for you. The best news is that 8 months into my cruise I haven't been seasick for five months and have been in large seas. You will adapt especially if you go out for an extended period of time.

The best and most comprehensive plan for addressing seasickness comes from John Mahina and can be found here: Mahina Expedition - Offshore Cruising Instruction If you follow his advise I am positive you can go cruising if you want too. Considering all the challenges to be met before cutting the dock lines seasickness is pretty near the bottom of the list. Fair winds.

Lee
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  #22  
Old 11-25-2009
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I just spent 3 months sailing, motoring and bobbing down the West Coast between Seattle and Cabo. I've honed my anti-seasickness method and tried it out on others successfully:
1/2 pill meclizine (aka bonine) 2 days prior to departure
1/2 pill in the AM 1 day prior
1/2 pill the night before
and then 1/2 pill in the morning and again at night for the first three days of your voyage, UNLESS... your voyage has been very calm, and in those first three days you started to get rough weather. In that case, keep taking it until the rough weather passes. You will likely be "acclimated" for the next bout of rough weather and not need the drug.

Meclizine has a strange way of making me drowsy about 4 hours after I take a whole pill. The 1/2 pill dose solves this altogether.

And remember that most "ginger ale" has no ginger in it at all. READ the labels! Reeds Extra Ginger is the best if you can find it.
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  #23  
Old 11-25-2009
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One point I don't think that was made.... what kind of boats do you get seasick on? There are some people who get seasick on a monohull, but do better with the quicker motion of a catamaran or trimaran...and others who get sick on multihulls, but are fine on monohulls... try a bunch of different boats to see if any specific designs are better or worse.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #24  
Old 11-25-2009
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sometimes besides the kind of boat ---could be the hull shape and depth of keel--each and every boat moves a bit differently---depending on cargo trim/weight distribution , displacement, rig type....cruising ketches move differently from racing sloops, for example---one might be a good motion for you the other a bad one--
-have you tried making tea from ginger root and keeping fresh ginger on board??
have you tried the wrist bands??
good luck--may you find a remedy that keeps you able to sail.....fair winds

Last edited by zeehag; 11-25-2009 at 12:26 PM. Reason: boatkat sympathises...and has speeeeel chick.....
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Old 11-25-2009
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I've been sailing for about 25 years and the only time I ever got sick was on a sunset cruise in Maui on a big catamaran. I knew they were evil.

Mike
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Old 11-26-2009
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I have lived on a boat for 6 months now and have been seasick only once. (28' Cape Dory, sailing down the eastern US seaboard in October/November, challenging seas.). I used tobe the one throwing up over the side of the boat. Transderm, dramamine, and then you just get used to it. Unless you have an inner ear condition I have been told that you can overcome almost any kind of seasickness. Find out what triggers it and avoid those things. I can't dig around 't dig around in lockers for very long in anything but calm calm water. I can't go below when we are sailing in rough seas. Otherwise I am quite comfortable BEst of luck to you, if this is your dream go for it, IF IT DOESN'T WORK OUT YOU CAN GO BACK TO LAND.
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Old 11-28-2009
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I commericaled with a guy swore he never got sea sick. I never once saw this guy feed the fish. One day in some heavy weather to say the least he decides to try and cook us all some fried spam. Now we were all in the wheel house at this time no kidden. As he is down below trying to cook. I smell somthing weird. I make my way down and what do I see. I see Jim filling up the sink with it. So yeah everyone and I mean everyone will get sick some more than other but to try and help you make up your mind about selling your house and moving onto a boat. I would say start small, live on the boat for 1 month. If after that you think it would be nice to have more room sell the house. Good luck and I say don't let your motion sickness keep you from sailing. Pick the right days and all is well.
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  #28  
Old 11-28-2009
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At least there is a bright side, seasickness is a sign of good health, it is a natural reaction to the body thinking it has been poisoned. We didn't evolve on the ocean, but we did evolve to toss whatever is in our stomach if our sense of vision doesn't match up with what our inner ear is telling us, something that usually doesn't happen unless we've eaten something we shouldn't have.
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  #29  
Old 12-15-2009
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I have a crew who is prone to seasickness but stugeron started 2 days berore sailing and continued for 5 days sorts him out.(why is it not available in US and we in UK can buy it over the counter. K
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  #30  
Old 12-15-2009
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I have been going to sea (as a fisherman) for 34 years. I have spent so many days, with so many different people, it must be a few hundred anyhow. But from all that I learned this:
I still get seasick now and then. My rule of thumb is easy. Most people get sick, one out of ten people never get sick, and one out of ten never get better. The rest of us get sick and get over it. The ones that never get better are the ones who get woozy at the dock, or in calm conditions. The only cure is to get to the beach. Other than that...I never let seasickness stop me from my dreams.
Funny but true hint: Eat apples if you suspect you will throw up. I kid you not, it tastes like apple juice when you puke...:-) Try it........ A whole lot better than a fatty acid barf
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Last edited by jmolan; 12-15-2009 at 09:35 PM.
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