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-   -   Should seasickness keep me away from becoming a Cruiser? (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/cruising-liveaboard-forum/57190-should-seasickness-keep-me-away-becoming-cruiser.html)

Sailmachine 08-18-2009 02:40 PM

Should seasickness keep me away from becoming a Cruiser?
 
I have made up my mind that I am going to sell the house and buy a boat. My plan is to spend the next year looking for a boat and getting the house ready for sale. But I get seasick :puke . Should this keep me away from this dream.

Pete

Pamlicotraveler 08-18-2009 03:08 PM

Stay off of boats.

St Anna 08-18-2009 03:10 PM

Hiya Sailmachine,
Great decision to go cruising. A few questions for you. How seasick do you get. Many people feel sick for just a few days and then magically, they feel OK. Others are like death warmed up. Where do you fit in?

If someone could feel a bit off, I give them a job to do - like steering or 'on watch'. Having some responsibility often means they havent got time to be sick. This would be you if you are the skipper - plenty of responsibility = no time to be sick.

Also if you know you are prone to seasickness, why sell the house - you may need a place to go back to??

Anyway, just my 2cents worth.
Cheers

Jeff_H 08-18-2009 03:16 PM

No, it probably should not keep you away from your dream.. Almost all of us get seasick at times. There are great meds for this. Unfortunately the best are not available in the US. Many people experience sickness in the first few days but get sealegs after a few days at sea. Others are not so lucky.

If you are incurable you might experiment with where you choose to cruise. There are cruising grounds whose sea states are mild enough where seasickness is less likely to occur.

One more suggestion: 1. There are people who are only affected by rapid in changes in motion. 2. There are people who are only affected by large angular changes in motion. 3. And there are people affected by both. It would be helpful if you tried to figure out which of these you were and if you are type 1 or 2, then I would try to pick a boat whose motion suits your tendancies. People who are type 1 do best with traditional designs and only very specific modern designs. People of type 2 do best with the better motioned modern designs (meaning not just any modern boat) and tend to do very poorly with traditional designs. For type 3 there is only drugs....

Jeff

tommays 08-18-2009 03:44 PM

Well

Everbody is different i get the MOST seasick cleaning the bottom with a mask and fins as being under the boat upside down causes some issue BUt i tend to fine on the rail in a big seas and wind :)

hellosailor 08-18-2009 03:48 PM

Pete, some people acclimate, some people can make do with drugs. Others never do and, hey, I'll never be an NBA star either, I can't shoot hoops.

The best thing you can do is to figure out how to start sailing regularly, to give your body a shot at getting used to it. And to look into the causes and remedies for seasickness, to minimize the effects on you. Plenty of threads on the web about that. No booze, no smoking, no greasy foods, good night sleep, general good physical shape before you go, all contribute to being more resistant to seasickness starting. A hangover and a good whiff of diesel fumes can set many folks off in no time at all.

Then there's the meds. There's a long long list of meds and gizmos, most work with different success on different people. You need to go down the list, starting with the simple ones and working your way into the rx-only ones, to see what works for you. The best way to do that is to start by taking one--and only one--at home on the weekend, see if it knocks you out or there are any adverse effects. Once you know how it feels to simply USE the med, you can use it on the boat and you don't have to worry about whether you are also imagining effects from the drugs.

Only one way to find out if you can live the dream: Step up and try it!

scottyt 08-18-2009 04:01 PM

i say go get a boat for a few days to see if it wears off.

i am lucky i dont get seasick

zeehag 08-18-2009 04:01 PM

try ginger pills or ginger root tea--with honey---and those wrist bands. i havent ever in my life gotten seasick--so i have no mercy or sympathy--dunno the feeling of seasick unless i take vicodin --then i get something like seasickness--LOL----but the ginger tea should help and ginger snaps --some swear by ginger pills....some wear wrist bands and feel fine...gooood luck.....

RealityCheck 08-18-2009 04:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by St Anna (Post 514724)
Hiya Sailmachine,
Great decision to go cruising. A few questions for you. How seasick do you get. Many people feel sick for just a few days and then magically, they feel OK. Others are like death warmed up. Where do you fit in?

If someone could feel a bit off, I give them a job to do - like steering or 'on watch'. Having some responsibility often means they havent got time to be sick. This would be you if you are the skipper - plenty of responsibility = no time to be sick.

Also if you know you are prone to seasickness, why sell the house - you may need a place to go back to??

Anyway, just my 2cents worth.
Cheers

Good Advise...

I have also found that when people first start getting sea sick do much better when becoming actively involved in the boat such as at the helm. It seems to me that the hand / eye/ ear work better with each other when at the wheel. You get feedback and I think that helps your systems counter the initial ear problems that result in sickness. If an anchor take a dip and cool the body off, don't get too physical swimming just float a bit.

I do not care for drugs except for short term use in hard cases. The First Day and Night Out are OK to have newer or unsure people on some form of sea sickness prevention medication. However most will have side effects such as being sleepy and not as alert. Always be a LERT! Dry mouth is another problem common with many medications.

Ginger in many forms appears to work well. I particularly like Ginger Beer nice and cold. Much better than Ginger ale or cookies. I know many who take Ginger tablets but they seem to take too long to work effectively.

It is almost impossible to help sea sickness once it passes a certain point.... best to put on a harness and barf over the sides until your tummy is empty rinse mouth & have a cracker and do not drink or eat for a few hours.

If I'm having to so something below with the engines while underway in rough seas I start getting a bit weesey particularly when it is hot. Getting back up to where wind can cool me and taking a moment allows it to pass quickly for me.

If your on a Catamaran and get sick... well just die... you deserve it!:laugher

peikenberry 08-18-2009 04:16 PM

So far all good advice. Very few people suffer from chronic seasickness, which is being sick all the time when underway. I am retired Coast Guard. I spent about 4 years of my career on ships and I was only seasick for the first few days, the first time we went to sea. I haven't been seasick since. But I served with a Captain, my C.O., on a ship who was chronically seasick. He had 34 years of sea time. So I suppose we can all live through it.

There are meds and other ways of dealing with it as stated. Buy the boat and go have a good time.


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