Aspects of cruising - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > Out There > Cruising & Liveaboard Forum
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 09-12-2009
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: WI
Posts: 32
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Cobra160 is on a distinguished road
Aspects of cruising

I am not sure where this goes but I thought I would start here.

I am looking to get into sailing. Maybe start in FL and the gulf of Mexico. I would like to get a 35' or so two (Married person) boat. I have been in the flying mode for some time. I own my own plane that I have to upkeep and hanger. I fly all over the US so I know about regulations and such that need to be addressed. I have done some small boat sailing on our lake. I am more interested in getting into live aboard type of sailing. A month at a time to start with. Possibly in the Gulf of Mexico or Bahamas. Most if not all repairs or maintenance I can do myself. I can make sails as well as any wood or fiberglass work that may need to be done.

What I would like to know from the experts is what is involved in live-aboard sailing. What kinds of permits am I looking at for sailing in the gulf or possibly the Bahamas? How long can these boats stay in the water without coming out? What are some of the gotcha costs that always are there but you never find out until you own? I am the kinda guy that does things on a budget. Fish for food rather than go ashore to a restaurant.

On an airplane you need to have it inspected by an authorized mechanic. Is this the same for a boat or can anyone do the inspections?

Thanks for any help

Dan
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 09-13-2009
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 286
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 7
AlanBrown is on a distinguished road
In the U.S. all you will need is proof of state registration. Nothing else.

Some folks try to avoid this and use their vessel's USCG documentation in lieu of state registration. It sounds good, but won't get you past the tax collector if he shows up at your dock.

As far as safety equipment goes, have one USCG-approved life jacket per passenger, at least two Type-B marine fire extinguishers, an air horn or other signaling device, and an emergency flare kit. You should also make sure that all the vessel's exterior lighting works properly.

Unlike an airplane, you are not required to conduct any annual inspections or maintain any fixed maintenance schedule. On a boat, you fix things when they break.

If you travel to the Bahamas, upon entering you must purchase a cruising permit, which is good for 12 months. This permit also includes a fishing license. From Noonsite:

"Entry fees must be paid by all visiting yachts and are as follows:
- $150 for all vessels under 35 feet
- $300 for vessels over 35 feet"

You may keep your vessel in the Bahamas up to three years, but must pay a $500 extension fee at the end of years 1 and 2 in order to remain

Finally, although no license is required for you to operate a boat, I strongly recommend that you sign up for any US Power Squadron or USCG Auxiliary courses offered in your area. They won't teach you how to sail, but they will help teach you the "rules of the road".

Good luck!
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 09-13-2009
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: WI
Posts: 32
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Cobra160 is on a distinguished road
Thank you Alan,

I am looking into a school right now in Lake Superior. 4 day course up through bareboat charter. I have to find something that the wife can come along for a reduced rate and no lessons.

Those rates for the Bahamas sound very reasonable. I am wondering how much a slip would usually cost at some of the smaller islands in the Bahamas.

Sounds like if I can keep the boat under 35' that would be a big help.

Dan
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 09-14-2009
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 286
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 7
AlanBrown is on a distinguished road
Marina space on the out islands, like the Abacos, isn't cheap. The last place I docked my 30 ft. Hunter now charges $500/mo. for the off-season (Sept-Feb) and $800/mo. for the rest of the year. I now keep my boat on a mooring for $200/mo.

Good plan to take a sailing class! As far as the wife goes, if she is also serious about cruising, she should take classes with you. At sea you will be a team and she will have to have to stand her fair share of watches. Don't scrimp on her education.

Good luck and have fun!
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 09-14-2009
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: WI
Posts: 32
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Cobra160 is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlanBrown View Post
Marina space on the out islands, like the Abacos, isn't cheap. The last place I docked my 30 ft. Hunter now charges $500/mo. for the off-season (Sept-Feb) and $800/mo. for the rest of the year. I now keep my boat on a mooring for $200/mo.

Good plan to take a sailing class! As far as the wife goes, if she is also serious about cruising, she should take classes with you. At sea you will be a team and she will have to have to stand her fair share of watches. Don't scrimp on her education.

Good luck and have fun!
If I have to rely on my wife at sea I might as well put a gun to my head right now.

Dan
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 09-14-2009
imagine2frolic's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 1,831
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 7
imagine2frolic is on a distinguished road
Get some good ground tackle, and forget the marinas. Staying in marinas brings you right back to land life. Living on the hook is free, and healthier. It is legal to take a weapon to the Bahamas just in case you feel you may need it.. ...........i2f
__________________
20 MPH ain't fast unless, you do it in a 1000sq 3/2 house on 10foot waves
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


BORROWED, No single one of us is as smart as all of us!
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 09-14-2009
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 143
Thanks: 4
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
fordo is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cobra160 View Post
If I have to rely on my wife at sea I might as well put a gun to my head right now.

Dan
If you aren't kidding about your wife, don't go. If you can't depend on your only crew you can be in serious trouble. You will be single handing while carrying a passenger. While a single hander accepts the risks of his(or her) adventure I would be reluctant to impose those risks on a passenger who hasn't the knowledge or experience to understand them. Daysailing is one thing but passages are long, can be tedious and can become very uncomfortable. If you're not in it together, it will be tough.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 09-14-2009
RealityCheck's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Tortola BVI
Posts: 247
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
RealityCheck is on a distinguished road
Sailing in the Gulf of Mexico and sailing in the Bahamas are significantly different types of sailing unless your just talking about taking the boat out for a sail occasionally. In the Bahamas your more of a cruiser than a live-aboard. True, you living on the boat in both situations but your location will probably vary more frequently cruising than in what most consider a more stagnant live-aboard. Some live-aboard never move from the slip... some actually can't!

What is it your looking for? Using the boat as a house or using it as a vehicle to get to new places or just as a sailing toy?

If your "Two Married Persons" means 4 people then a 36foot boat will get really small very quickly if all are not compatible and all have similar sailing interest. Any non preforming crew will soon become a problem for everyone. To some degree if your actually going to do serious cruising you will need to depend on the crew and a broken crew is a really bad thing that can occur quickly. While some things are very similar between boats and aircraft... the crew on a boat is far more active in most aspects and must be depended on at certain critical times.
__________________
I prefer a sailboat to a motorboat, and it is my belief that boat sailing is a finer, more difficult, and sturdier art than running a motor.... Jack London
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 09-14-2009
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: WI
Posts: 32
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Cobra160 is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by fordo View Post
If you aren't kidding about your wife, don't go. If you can't depend on your only crew you can be in serious trouble. You will be single handing while carrying a passenger. While a single hander accepts the risks of his(or her) adventure I would be reluctant to impose those risks on a passenger who hasn't the knowledge or experience to understand them. Daysailing is one thing but passages are long, can be tedious and can become very uncomfortable. If you're not in it together, it will be tough.
You have to remember I am pilot. I take on this responsibility each time I take off. I fly all over the US with my family, kids and grandkids. It is a huge responsibility, but one that is well worth it. Have you ever seen Niagara Falls from the air? I have been there twice on the ground and was not that impressed. the time I flew over it though opens your eyes to a whole new experience. Flying to the Bahamas in my four seater is not out of the question for me so I would not think that sailing there would be any different.

Each time you get into a car you put yourself at risk. In my opinion far more risk that if you take off in your own plane. Done correct I think sailing can be even less risk.

Dan
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #10  
Old 09-14-2009
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: WI
Posts: 32
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Cobra160 is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by RealityCheck View Post
Sailing in the Gulf of Mexico and sailing in the Bahamas are significantly different types of sailing unless your just talking about taking the boat out for a sail occasionally. In the Bahamas your more of a cruiser than a live-aboard. True, you living on the boat in both situations but your location will probably vary more frequently cruising than in what most consider a more stagnant live-aboard. Some live-aboard never move from the slip... some actually can't!

What is it your looking for? Using the boat as a house or using it as a vehicle to get to new places or just as a sailing toy?

If your "Two Married Persons" means 4 people then a 36foot boat will get really small very quickly if all are not compatible and all have similar sailing interest. Any non preforming crew will soon become a problem for everyone. To some degree if your actually going to do serious cruising you will need to depend on the crew and a broken crew is a really bad thing that can occur quickly. While some things are very similar between boats and aircraft... the crew on a boat is far more active in most aspects and must be depended on at certain critical times.
My wife and I for the most part. Mostly getting to other places. I like to visit different cultures and do not like the commercialized version. I am more of a get back to the less traveled parts. Help a local villager re-roof his hut for some bananas type of guy.

I do not believe that you will have to depend on crew if the boat is able to be sailed alone. This would mean that if you wanted to take your elderly father you would not be able to. If you went with your 3 year old grandson he is not really going to be any help either. What I think you can not do is take off depending on help and then not get it.

I have vacationed with my wife for 31 years or so now. I have learned to not expect any help but if I get it great. Some of the worst vacations were when I expected her to make some decisions and she didn't.

Not really a sailing toy, I plan on Bahamas, Gulf, Panama canal, up Pacific coast, Alaska, Up Mississippi, around Great lakes up and out through Canada. Atlantic maybe over to UK. I had planned a flight from Canada, to Greenland and over to the UK. Fuel is getting too expensive now to do it.

I am looking at this more like the older couple that buys a motorhome and travels around the US. My US is just a little bigger.

Dan
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Retirement Cruising Budgets Randy Harman Cruising Articles 0 05-12-2004 08:00 PM
Calculating the Cost of Cruising Paul & Sheryl Shard Cruising Articles 0 04-03-2003 07:00 PM
Calculating the Cost of Cruising Paul & Sheryl Shard Her Sailnet Articles 0 04-03-2003 07:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:27 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.