anchoring with a cruiser lifestyle - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest Forums > Cruising & Liveaboard Forum
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 01-28-2010
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 29
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
ryanjenkins is on a distinguished road
anchoring with a cruiser lifestyle

So, things are moving along nicely with my goal of being a live aboard oceanic east coast cruiser within the next year, but i wanted to steal some more knowledge from yall.


What is the deal with anchoring ? I have heard from multiple people anchoring is not chargeable in the USA, and as i am on a really tight budget and have NO problems being alone and dingy-ing in to land to get fresh water and take a break, is strictly anchoring rather than paying for docking and moorings a legitimate possibility?

If it is, what are peoples opinions on the most permanent ways of anchoring for a few days at a time? and possibly even leaving the boat during that time overnight? is that just crazy talk? Mushroom anchors and multiple danforths as well?


gotta run at work, will write back more later. I am just asking because looking at what it would cost to actually dock/moore whenever i needed a break or get away from weather the prices are absolutely astronomical, at least 50 bucks a day on most moors/docks. That is just... absurd unless you are loaded with cash.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 01-28-2010
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 8 Times in 8 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
Anchoring, for a boat in transit, can be restricted to a very limited degree. In more heavily developed areas, there will likely be more restrictions on anchoring, and in some cases a prohibition on it in areas that have been developed as mooring fields.

However, I would highly recommend that you NEVER refer to yourself as a liveaboard, but as a full-time cruiser in transit.
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 01-28-2010
CalebD's Avatar
Tartan 27' owner
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: NYC
Posts: 4,441
Thanks: 4
Thanked 74 Times in 67 Posts
Rep Power: 7
CalebD will become famous soon enough
There must be a few hundred threads here about which anchors are best. Usually the Rocna or Manson Supreme (knock off of Rocna) are considered most reliable.
It is really not advisable to leave your boat anchored for days without someone being on board. Weather has a habit of changing.
Slips are quite expensive and you would be lucky to find one for $50/night. A cheaper alternative is to rent a 'transient' mooring somewhere inexpensive. In NYC you can rent a mooring by 79th St. for $30/night (this is also where the anchorage is). Marinas : West 79th Street Boat Basin : New York City Department of Parks & Recreation The boat club in Nyack (on Hudson) rents transient moorings for $25/night I think.
Moorings are usually quite secure but not foolproof. Mooring pennants can chafe through (same for an anchor rhode) and old chain can decide to part. Many responsible boaters will do an 'anchor watch' through the night especially if the weather is intense. Many GPS units can be set to trigger an alarm if the location changes more then a specified range.
Boating ain't cheap but there are ways to do it cheaper.
Good luck.
__________________
"The cure for anything is salt water~ sweat, tears, or the sea." ~Isak Denesen

Everybody has one:

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 01-28-2010
CaptainForce's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: living aboard since 1972
Posts: 1,654
Thanks: 0
Thanked 10 Times in 10 Posts
Rep Power: 9
CaptainForce will become famous soon enough
We're seasonal latitude adjusting East Coast cruisers, not "snowbirds", but "Hurricane birds". We've been living aboard in Florida since 1972. Anchoring is common for us, but specific by location. In transit we can most always find a night or two often in a wilderness location. When provisioning or visiting town we seek a town dinghy dock (normally free) and access to groceries, laudromat, water, pump out, and more. We have about thirty locations on the East US Coast that have these amenities available from anchor. We also have about twelve locations that we frequent for dockage at a weekly or monthly rate and about another dozen locations mostly in New England where we rent moorings. When at anchor we use a plow and/or a Bruce with all chain on the plow and 20' of chain before nylon on the Bruce. 'take care and joy, Aythya crew
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 01-28-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Gloucester, MA
Posts: 584
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 5
klem is on a distinguished road
I have never heard of being charged to anchor but sometimes anchoring is prohibited. Most places have a maximum amount of time that you can anchor there. Personally, I much prefer to anchor and have spent well over 1000 nights on the hook at this point. If you are counting on anchoring all the time, make sure that you have ground tackle that will allow you to anchor in some less protected areas because there is no room to anchor in the good harbors in certain parts of the coast.

If you are leaving the boat for a while, you might consider renting a mooring. It is also likely to be closer to the dock making it easier to move supplies.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 01-29-2010
St Anna's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Southern QLD, Bayside
Posts: 1,428
Thanks: 1
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 12
St Anna is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
I would highly recommend that you NEVER refer to yourself as a liveaboard, but as a full-time cruiser in transit.
This advice goes well anywhere in the world
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 01-29-2010
bljones's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: South Coast Ontario
Posts: 8,077
Thanks: 31
Thanked 68 Times in 61 Posts
Rep Power: 7
bljones has a spectacular aura about bljones has a spectacular aura about
Two words:
Distant Star.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 01-29-2010
CaptainForce's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: living aboard since 1972
Posts: 1,654
Thanks: 0
Thanked 10 Times in 10 Posts
Rep Power: 9
CaptainForce will become famous soon enough
Quote:
Originally Posted by klem View Post
I have never heard of being charged to anchor but sometimes anchoring is prohibited. Most places have a maximum amount of time that you can anchor there................
I assume that the places you refer to where anchoring is prohibited are in chanels, cable areas, military or government restricted zones or within established mooring fields. I'm not familiar with an state. county, or city legislation that have countered the federal laws provided a freedom of navigation (including anchoring) in US waters. Local attempts made in Florida to prohibit anchoring of vessels engaged in navigation have failed. We have experienced difficulty anchoring in New England because of the areas that are saturated with mooring fields, but most of the East Coast doesn't suffer from this. Please add to our knowledge of these "maximaum amount of time" restrictions. We've never experienced an anchorage with a time restriction. Who records, regulates and enforces this time rule? Thanks, 'take care and joy, Aythya crew
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 01-29-2010
Cruisingdad's Avatar
Best Looking MALE Mod
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Mobile Liveaboards
Posts: 9,894
Thanks: 3
Thanked 94 Times in 49 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptainForce View Post
I assume that the places you refer to where anchoring is prohibited are in chanels, cable areas, military or government restricted zones or within established mooring fields. I'm not familiar with an state. county, or city legislation that have countered the federal laws provided a freedom of navigation (including anchoring) in US waters. Local attempts made in Florida to prohibit anchoring of vessels engaged in navigation have failed. We have experienced difficulty anchoring in New England because of the areas that are saturated with mooring fields, but most of the East Coast doesn't suffer from this. Please add to our knowledge of these "maximaum amount of time" restrictions. We've never experienced an anchorage with a time restriction. Who records, regulates and enforces this time rule? Thanks, 'take care and joy, Aythya crew
Yep, that was what I was abuot to type. There are a few place in Florida (I am at one right now... Fort Myers Beach) where the municipality has taken over the anchorage and set up mooring balls which of course prevents anchoring. In all fairness to them, it was being abused as a local dump for jerks who care less about their boats and typically abandon. It is those people that screw it up for the rest of us that might actually be cruising. However, in all fairness, there are places to anchor very close to the mooring field so you are not absolutely required to grab a ball there.

Back to the quesiton: I will say that I prefer anchoring out to being in a marina... always. However, before you sell the farm and commit to it, you better try hauling the water aboard every couple of days. You will also have to deal with recharging your batteries, diesel, pumpout (certianly you are not going to dump overboard inside the 3 mile I hope), and hot water. That is just to name a few of the issues. Now you also have food, watching out for storms, dragging anchors, etc.

My prefence myght be anchoring out, but it comes with a lot of negatives too. Some people do not care and work around it. Fine. I personally am not in a financial position where I mind paying marinas along the way as I want to or need to. My financial ability does not change the fact that I prefer anchoring out. And I suspect my boat is set up for anchoring out much better than yours as I have set it up to be electrically independent (with a large solar array, tankage, and diesel generator). The investment on those items would be very hard to recoup if compared against the cost of a marina or mooring ball.

One last thing: Going from land life to anchoring out will be a huge culture shock for you. If it is just you, I suspect that you will handle it better. I am tryping this as there have been many people ask me (many of them with young families) about the reality of anchoring. I think that if it is all possible, sliding into it with a marina first is easier - even if it taxes the budget for a little while. Just sign a transient. And if you pay for the week or the month (or longer), the more discount you get until you find that it is by far cheaper than most apartments (that I would live in anyways).

Just my opinions. But make sure you consider the advice given on these threads carefully against those that have actually lived aboard and spent time on the hook - which I have, Captain Force has, and some others.

All the best,

Brian
__________________
Sailnet Adminstrator & Moderator
Catalina 400 Technical Editor

2004 Catalina 400, Sea Mist IV (our boat, F/T Mobile Live Aboards in S FL and Keys primarily)
1987 Tayana Vancouver 42, Credendo Vides, (Mom and Pops boat, F/T Mobile Live Aboards in Puget Sound)

My Website:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


Follow My Blog at:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


Follow me on Facebook:

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #10  
Old 01-29-2010
AdamLein's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Coquitlam, BC
Posts: 1,866
Thanks: 1
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
AdamLein will become famous soon enough
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptainForce View Post
Please add to our knowledge of these "maximaum amount of time" restrictions. We've never experienced an anchorage with a time restriction. Who records, regulates and enforces this time rule?
Not exactly your area but False Creek in Vancouver, BC has two popular anchorages which are administered by the False Creek Harbour Authority. It's right in the middle of downtown Vancouver. To anchor you need a free permit, and it limits your stay to 14 out of 30 days in the summer and 21 out of 40 in the winter.

These rules were created because the locals in their expensive waterfront condominia were unhappy about "derelict" boats in the harbor. I don't know how accurate that description is, but I have seen a couple of clearly derelict boats anchored there for months or years, and the city doesn't seem to be able to enforce their rules. Personally I'd rather stay on good terms with the Harbour Authority.
__________________
s/v Essorant
1972 Catalina 27
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Anchoring Control Liza Copeland Learning to Sail Articles 0 05-05-2003 08:00 PM
Anchoring Control Liza Copeland Seamanship Articles 0 05-05-2003 08:00 PM
Anchoring Control Liza Copeland Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 05-05-2003 08:00 PM
Anchoring Control Liza Copeland Cruising Articles 0 05-05-2003 08:00 PM
Anchoring out Differences Micca Hutchins Seamanship Articles 0 08-31-1999 08:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:31 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012