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post #1 of 9 Old 07-31-2010 Thread Starter
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Where do you stow what?

Where do you stow what?

Several people have mentioned keeping sails in the forepeak;
I can't imagine having to go all the way forward in the cabin
to get the sails, especially dragging wet sails or bags through the
cabin. But I can't really think of a better place.

Cooking stuff goes in the galley, but if you're on a long trip, all the consumables won't fit there.

I figure you want most sailing gear, lines and fenders in the cockpit
lockers; can you fit everything there?

What do you put in the more inaccessible areas?
Under the bunks and settees?

Thanks, Jim.

Jim Baranski, Franklin ME
17' Siren; looking for a bigger old boat!
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post #2 of 9 Old 07-31-2010
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Forepeak is pretty much useless as a sleeping cabin at sea. Most sail changes are likely to be headsails. Ergo makes sense to keep sails up there and haul them out through f'ward hatch if conditions allow.

Where you store food for a passage or long cruise away from supply points is always going to be a problem on a small boat. We're lucky in that we have a pantry cupboard in the galley, big icebox under chart table and good stowage space in quarterberth lockers and bins. Tools also live in the quarterberth, which was originally a double but space under cockpit now storage bins.


We also have quite large cockpit locker to starboard which holds inflatable, cockpit cushions, bbq, spare anchors etc. Fenders and assorted lines are in the lazarett.

Not much stowage under saloon bunks due to water tanks and batteries. Rarely used sails are under v-berth.

Pretty standard arrangement for a boat of our size and configeration, i'd guess.

Andrew B

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post #3 of 9 Old 07-31-2010
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WHAT EVER YOU DO MAKE A PLAN OF YOUR LOCKERS AND CROSS REFERENCE THIS TO A LIST OF WHAT YOU HAVE ONBOARD.

This will save you having to search through every locker for the spare gizmo that you need NOW!
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post #4 of 9 Old 07-31-2010
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I carry all chain rode so that means the storage lockers in the bow are filled with light items.

I have a center line water and fuel tank system so I try to divide the weight equally in the saloon.

I have roller furling jib and a hanked on main. I carry a small storm trysail and drogue in one of the cockpit lockers.

My battery bank is located starboard side outboard of the engine so I try to compensate for the Trojan batteries with a little less on that side. I carry charts as well and they're stored under the pilot berth mattress.

I load the interior stern lockers with the heavy, less actively used items so as to compensate a bit for the chain and anchors on the bow.

The cockpit lockers have fenders, extra line, extra fuel and water, and sailing gear. I carry the outboard on the starboard aft pushpit railing. If I'm on a long passage I'll deflate the fenders as much as I can, knowing I can use a small compressor to inflate them as I get close to shore.

The boat sits almost level in the water. I carry as little on deck as possible. My tender sits in a bag lashed aft of the mast and ahead of the dodger. I don't carry a life raft yet.

I made a map of every storage location on the boat, including dimensions. When I started filling the boat, I knew that cooking gear and the first months food had to be convenient. I worked outboard, then fore and aft to get things figured out. I used a bathroom scale to get the weights about even. I put everything into a spreadsheet (item, location, weight, cost, qty, etc) and printed out a copy. If I had a senior moment, I could grab the list and find the item fairly quickly.

As time went by, I moved things around, added stuff, but tried to keep the boat balanced. I wanted the heavy stuff as low as possible, the lightest stuff high and outboard (considering the number of books I carry, I guess I failed that part), and the items I'd use the most or needed in a basic emergency close to the top of the pile. Having the list and map of the contents made finding items fairly easy.

Capt. Douglas Abbott
USCG/MCA IV/C.I./M.I. 500-ton Oceans
PADI MSDT

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Last edited by oceanscapt; 07-31-2010 at 05:51 PM.
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post #5 of 9 Old 07-31-2010
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You guys remind me that I did forget to mention the map and/or list of where thingamejig that you need to adjust the watchamecallit is. Really is most important particularly as the size of the boat increases.

One other thing we have found to be an indispensible part of stowage....keep raising the waterline.....

Andrew B

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post #6 of 9 Old 07-31-2010
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In the Allied Princess (1978, 36') there is a large V berth with lots of space beneath, accessed by two square lids, one under each of the two cushions. I discovered that milk crates would fit into those under-V berth spaces snugly, resting on/between the inner-hull reinforcing bump in the GRP and the wood of the V berth box, so we had, I think it was twelve, milk crates with various items stored in that space, with the least-frequent items lowest and farthest forward, each crate labeled with tape and marker and coded with VS1-6 and VP1-6 in the spreadsheet, so I knew exactly where the thing I was seeking might be. There were still odd spaces for bulky-but-light things like inflater pumps.

I used the spaces behind settees for longer or dryer items, such as paper towel or TP, spaghetti in seal-a-meal plastic, etc. There was a shelf across the access to the chain locker, and it was EXACTLY the length of my electronic piano keyboard, in its case, besides being dry and protected, so musical instruments wound up there.

I had labeled all the cans with sharpie, intending to stow them in the shallower parts of the bilge, but it was utterly unnecessary, given the amount of accessible space the Princess had in the galley and saloon areas.

I hoarded excess socks for the year before we left, to store/protect all the bottles in our liquor locker, and that worked out pretty well, except that we didn't drink nearly as much as we had thought we would!

Charts under least-used settee cushion, my husband had free run of the aft Qtrberth and both deep cockpit lockers for storage of tools (Qberth) and fenders, etc. (lockers). The aft end of the aft Qberth gave access into the port cockpit locker, so there was no wasted space, but we never did use that berth for anything but a little extra nav station seating.

She had a 4.5' draft and a poured-lead full keel, so she sat straight and level in the water even when loaded by someone worrying more about where stuff would fit than how much it weighed -- these days, with our catamaran (which displaces about a ton less than the Allied), I will be paying much more attention to weight, and specifically trying to keep it even and out of the bow, underway.
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post #7 of 9 Old 08-01-2010
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We keep our sails on the booms and furled on our headstay except for a cruising chute in the v-berth , shelved, and a working jib in an aft cabin locker. Our life jackets are cased on deck and our six fenders are on deck,-two hanging on the taff rail. Two anchors are on bow davits and one folded below. Spare parts, tools, stored foods and drinks are in bins and lockers below. We've been on our current boat for 26 years, so we pretty much know where everything is located without a list. Take care an djoy, aythya crew
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post #8 of 9 Old 08-01-2010
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I keep the 80-proof in its readily accessible, dedicated rack, next to the companionway, available for all emergencies. Everything else is pretty much stowed, stuffed, or crammed into whatever locker is handy at the moment.
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post #9 of 9 Old 08-02-2010
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Details depend on your individual boat size and shape and your personal needs, of course. We worry less about keeping things in places that would be logical on land, and more about the quality of the lockers. We keep heavy things, like tools, low and centerline. Electronics go in the driest lockers. Charts lay flat under cushions in the main settees. Off season clothing and spare bedding gets rolled or stuffed into bolsters on the main settees in lieu of pillows. When we provisioned for a long trip, backup food supplies were in a very inaccessible locker, with about a months worth of food in the galley lockers. Once a month we went "shopping" in that inaccessible locker to replenish our supplies.
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