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  #21  
Old 09-29-2010
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......so what time you want us all onboard for dinner??

We do love cooking, and are often ambitious maybe too ambitious onboard with our 2 burner metho stove.....reading cruising books from the 80s we have both despaired at the thought of eating canned food for days on passages when we begin fulltime cruising.
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  #22  
Old 09-29-2010
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We are probably in the Faster category though we strive to match Sequitur. Trouble is that like Fast we don't have a 50'er, nay not even 40.

One thing I do endorse is the use of china instead of plastic. Yes we do keep a melamine set for when the going gets rough but if the weather is good we'll use the china. It simply more enjoyable to eat off.

Also I'm a glass person when it comes to wine and beer, albeit the beer is in a bottle. We keep a collection of wine glasses on board and since we've had her have only lost two or three. All of those when at anchor and usually a snapped stem rather than complete smash. The glass maker Reidel (sp) do a range of stemless wine glasses, the only downside being that the base is not really flat enough. What we do go for is short stemmed wine glasses. Stability does not seem to be an issue, we have some nifty silicon grips that go over the base to prevent sliding.

Now most of our passages are coastal day hops. Then we'll be eating sandwiches and soup in the main. Ham, cheese, mortadella, salami with some cucumber , capsicum, lettuce for a bit of crunch works for us along with a dollop of mustard pickles.

Soup is good for an overnighter, as are simple casseroles which can at a pinch go into a wide necked thermos.

For me the big indispensable for cooking onboard is one of these...we have the one of the smaller sizes....bit on the heavy side but I love it.

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  #23  
Old 09-29-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chall03 View Post
......so what time you want us all onboard for dinner??
Come knock on the hull, we're on a mooring in La Punta.
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Originally Posted by chall03 View Post
.....reading cruising books from the 80s we have both despaired at the thought of eating canned food for days on passages when we begin fulltime cruising.
Same with us... we never could get into the idea of subverting dining just because we're cruising.
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  #24  
Old 09-29-2010
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Originally Posted by richeperkin View Post
@MacGyverRI do you ship you merlot (no pun intended. . .well, maybe a little, but I'd still drink it if you mailed it)
Sorry, I can only do that w/ friends (gifts) since I'm a home-brewer, so it's illegal to sell it.

I have checked into licenses since so many people love this blend, but they're NUTS! Almost $5k for all licenses needed before you can pay them a lousy $.20 (twenty cents) a gallon tax...

Some states do have a "Micro-Brew" type license and that's way more reasonable but we don't have that option here.
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  #25  
Old 09-29-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sequitur View Post
Come knock on the hull, we're on a mooring in La Punta.

Same with us... we never could get into the idea of subverting dining just because we're cruising.

Most passages are less than a week. Even with the most basic of refrigeration there is no excuse for eating canned muck after less than seven days. Without decent refrigeration the second week will take some careful planning though by week three if you don't have a freezer things are going to get nasty unless you can catch the odd fish and like eating rice/dried noodles or pasta/ polenta that sort of thing.

Vacuum sealed meat and fish will last a couple of weeks refrigerated, three weeks is probably pushing the envelope.

Dairy products will be fine refrigerated, probably resorting to UHT milk by end of week two at best. Eggs, three weeks should be cool is fresh enough when bought.

Canned vegetables are vaguely acceptable. some dried vegetables are also OK but I have yet to find a canned meat that is anything other than a very last resort. There is a mob called Fray Bentos who do canned pies. I'm not saying I'd go out of my way to find one but as emergency rations they fit the bill, most assuredly they are vastly superior to any frozen pie I have ever been forced to eat. Tinned soups are another last resort. Baxters are the best that I have found. Beyond that canned produce is best kept for the occasional sanger and maybe a salad.
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  #26  
Old 09-29-2010
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Sequitur- awesome looking meals!

I personally would drop the "auxilary carbs" (bread/potatoes/rice/etc). They make it just that much more work to cook, but add no real nutritional or food enjoyment value to me. I suppose they are calories that can easily be stored without refrigeration though.
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  #27  
Old 09-29-2010
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Originally Posted by tdw View Post
One thing I do endorse is the use of china instead of plastic. Yes we do keep a melamine set for when the going gets rough but if the weather is good we'll use the china. It simply more enjoyable to eat off.
We seem to break fewer pieces of china aboard than we did ashore, but that's no reason for us to downgrade to eating off plastic or paper ashore.

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Also I'm a glass person when it comes to wine and beer, albeit the beer is in a bottle. We keep a collection of wine glasses on board and since we've had her have only lost two or three. All of those when at anchor and usually a snapped stem rather than complete smash. The glass maker Reidel (sp) do a range of stemless wine glasses, the only downside being that the base is not really flat enough.
Our stemware of choice aboard and ashore is Riedel (I used to import it and introduced it to Canada a few decades ago). Their Magnum Party Tube is a wonderfully robust tube of four stems that will store safely through most any seas.

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For me the big indispensable for cooking onboard is one of these...we have the one of the smaller sizes....bit on the heavy side but I love it.

I agree with you; it is an extremely useful galley piece. We have a similar enamelled cast iron Dutch oven from Ikea, and prefer it to any I have ever used from Le Creuset.
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  #28  
Old 09-30-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MacGyverRI
Some states do have a "Micro-Brew" type license and that's way more reasonable but we don't have that option here.
Even if the state will issue a micro-brew license, you still need the federal license to sell any spirits. The state licensing is simply ON TOP of the federal requirements.
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  #29  
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I think I need cooking (and fishing) lessons.

My cooking choice depends on the length of the trip and the weather conditions. I tend to eat light the first few days, especially if I have crew or the weather's less than pleasant.

If the fishing's good then it's fish a couple times a day until I run out. I carry a lot of unrefrigerated produce and fruit and try to extend their life as long as possibler (I've had good luck with those green produce bags).

I cook ahead and try to have a base in the fridge to keep me in the cockpit rather than in the galley. The idea is that it takes only a bit more heat to make a double portion than a single. I work hard at conserving water, fuel, and food but things do run out and I do get tired of bananas and cabbage.

I add a special item to the mix a couple times a week, especially if the fresh produce is gone or the fish are elsewhere.

Sometimes it's the simple things that make me smile and my stomach growl. I grow a small selection of herbs and that always seems to take the edge off tinned food. I make my own bread and muffins. I never seem to get tired of baked beans and fresh warm corn bread. I look forward to opening a self canned jar of goodies.

It seems to me that some food vendors seem to do better in the can than out. I had to learn by trying them to find the brands I thought were the best for the money and longevity.

I'm keenly aware of the weather and will cook simple meals ahead of time for times of bad weather. I fry only at anchor and am very cautious about boiling when underway.

Finally, I try not to run out of the goodies/treats, thereby being forced to shop in the next anchorage/port of call. I do confess to a strong "fresh" produce/fruit buying desire after going without for weeks. Economical provisioning ports are few and far between. As a frugal sailor, as much as I'd like a tomato and head of lettuce for that BLT, I'm not willing to pay $4 for either of them.
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  #30  
Old 09-30-2010
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Originally Posted by oceanscapt View Post
I carry a lot of unrefrigerated produce and fruit and try to extend their life as long as possible
Yes, I think this is essential. It is simply a matter of regularly monitoring the condition of the produce, and of using the ones in the worst condition first. It is amazing how long many things last, if they are well selected. As a rough guide we use: Still Tasty, which gives good basic storage information, though we always get much longer times than the site indicates.

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I cook ahead and try to have a base in the fridge to keep me in the cockpit rather than in the galley. The idea is that it takes only a bit more heat to make a double portion than a single.
Before we leave port I prepare multiple meals of stews, soups, pilafs and so on. These we freeze in one-litre Lock and Lock containers to be pulled-out, thawed and reheated when the weather is too rough for cooking. When the weather and sea state are benign, I will often make double, triple or larger quantities at sea, some for now, some for the fridges and some to replenish the freezers. Some are a ready to heat meal, others are the base to which additional ingredients and creativity are added.

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Originally Posted by oceanscapt View Post
Sometimes it's the simple things that make me smile and my stomach growl. I grow a small selection of herbs and that always seems to take the edge off tinned food. I make my own bread and muffins. I never seem to get tired of baked beans and fresh warm corn bread. I look forward to opening a self canned jar of goodies.
We agree, it is the homemade comfort food that really satisfies, no matter how simple or how complex. For bread, we find the New York Times no-knead bread recipe works wonderfully aboard to make creative artisan-style loaves.

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Originally Posted by oceanscapt View Post
Finally, I try not to run out of the goodies/treats, thereby being forced to shop in the next anchorage/port of call. I do confess to a strong "fresh" produce/fruit buying desire after going without for weeks. Economical provisioning ports are few and far between. As a frugal sailor, as much as I'd like a tomato and head of lettuce for that BLT, I'm not willing to pay $4 for either of them.
I consider provisioning to be an essential part of cruising, and a large part of this for us is trying to plan our stocking-up with a view ahead to our next ports, and what is available (or not) in them, both physically and economically. Like you, we will not pay excessive prices.
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